Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSiah Armajani
IN THE NEWS

Siah Armajani

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Walking into "The Poetry Garden" is like walking into an orderly public park in a small Midwestern city. And, into a dynamic Russian Constructivist stage set. And, into the sequestered space of a Persian miniature. And, into the hand-hewn enclosure of a California Mission courtyard. And, finally, into assorted other spaces whose vaguely familiar identities are not immediately apparent, but which will likely reveal themselves over time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Walking into "The Poetry Garden" is like walking into an orderly public park in a small Midwestern city. And, into a dynamic Russian Constructivist stage set. And, into the sequestered space of a Persian miniature. And, into the hand-hewn enclosure of a California Mission courtyard. And, finally, into assorted other spaces whose vaguely familiar identities are not immediately apparent, but which will likely reveal themselves over time.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1994
"I appreciate this place as a kind of sanctuary, a refuge from the industrial flatland that surrounds it. It's a nice place to drop in and get a whiff of poetry or just meditate. Each of the four lecterns has a different book on it. Someone in the morning will put out the books. I like the kind of trust of this place. Today I was struck by the Vietnamese poet, and I thought I'd sample a couple of others. I don't usually read much poetry--this is kind of a chance to get a look at it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2003 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
While the intersection of art and design is one of the most interesting topics in both of those worlds these days, it's hardly a new one. Artists -- those who define themselves first as makers of objects without specific use -- have been making functional objects for eons. The question "Is it art, or design?" probably did not occur, for example, to early 20th century Modernist sculptor Constantin Brancusi when he carved wooden pedestals for his lithe sculptures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Imagine a university whose young communications students mingle with ancient Buddhas who perpetually watch TV. A campus whose Arcadian groves have been infiltrated by "talking trees." An institution of higher education with a flamboyant "Sun God" sculpture as its official mascot. A hall of learning said to have "giraffe nets" and Stonehenge-like "ruins" on its grounds. A state-owned facility expected to install a neon parade of virtues and vices atop a new building next year.
BOOKS
June 27, 1993 | Kim Bendheim
In poetry and in art, you get this paradox: a beautiful thing that cuts you open. Emily Dickinson put it better: She said she knew it was poetry when she felt as if the top of her head was taken off. In his introduction to the first of four summer readings in the Poetry Garden at the Lannan Foundation last Sunday Patrick Lannan quoted Dickinson.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | LEAH OLLMAN
Private money, public art. The marriage, if not made in heaven, is at least relatively free of the possessive pandering that goes on with the pairing of public money and public art. The use of public funds calls for a degree of public accountability that art programs nationwide have found difficult to meet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1995 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The Los Angeles-based Lannan Foundation--a $150-million nonprofit organization that supports visual art, literature and charitable causes--will terminate its exhibition program next year and disperse its 1,500-piece collection of contemporary art. Lisa Lyons, a renowned curator, author and arts administrator who has directed the foundation's art program since 1989, has resigned in reaction to the foundation trustees' decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"Maya: Treasures of an Ancient Civilization" goes on display at the Natural History Museum in Exposition Park, Sept. 7 through Nov. 10. Described by museum Director Craig Black as "the most spectacular exhibition of Mayan art ever assembled," the landmark exhibition presents a broad overview with 275 objects including sculptures and figurines of carved jade, wood, shell and ceramic; implements and tools, and metalwork including gold pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1994 | STEVEN LINAN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Few Shake-Ups: Monday's temblor may have shaken up TV schedules early in the week, but there were few plans by networks or affiliates to replay episodes of series that were bumped by the continuous news coverage. Officials at most stations said the episodes that were not shown in Los Angeles would be televised at a later date. ABC soap operas that were preempted Monday and Tuesday were shown during the early morning hours both days.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2003 | Karren Mills, Associated Press
Legend has it that in 1958, when General Mills moved into its new headquarters, Charlie Bell, who was then the company's president, took a look around and said: "It's too gray in here. We've got to do something to enliven this building." His solution was to buy art and display it throughout the building and its lush, parklike grounds. General Mills didn't snatch up just any art, though.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|