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NEWS
January 20, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's enough to make California electricity customers count their blessings. Across the Pacific Ocean in the Russian Far East, Olga Korolyova is troubled by blackouts. But unlike her counterparts in California, it's not the darkness that she fears, or even her electric bill. It's the cold. Since December, the temperature has hovered around minus-40 degrees Fahrenheit--cold even by Siberian standards. Little or no heat comes from Korolyova's radiators.
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NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Steve Gutterman, Associated Press Writer
Sipping from an outsized cup at a coffee shop, his computer jargon competing with the sounds of U2 and frothing latte, software designer Yuri Bannov could almost be in Silicon Valley. Only the birch trees and babushkas outside give away his actual location: Siberia. Although Bannov lives in Akademgorodok, a faded former center of Soviet scientific might, his company does almost all its work for clients in the United States and Europe.
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NEWS
December 3, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty-one coal miners were killed in a huge underground explosion in Siberia on Tuesday, leaving Russia in mourning after one of the worst mining catastrophes in its history. A methane blast, whose precise cause authorities pledged to investigate, ripped through the Zyryanovskaya coal mine in western Siberia at 1 a.m., after a new shift of workers had come down the shaft to start work but before the previous shift had left. "There are about 100 rescue workers at the site," said Col.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's enough to make California electricity customers count their blessings. Across the Pacific Ocean in the Russian Far East, Olga Korolyova is troubled by blackouts. But unlike her counterparts in California, it's not the darkness that she fears, or even her electric bill. It's the cold. Since December, the temperature has hovered around minus-40 degrees Fahrenheit--cold even by Siberian standards. Little or no heat comes from Korolyova's radiators.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Steve Gutterman, Associated Press Writer
Sipping from an outsized cup at a coffee shop, his computer jargon competing with the sounds of U2 and frothing latte, software designer Yuri Bannov could almost be in Silicon Valley. Only the birch trees and babushkas outside give away his actual location: Siberia. Although Bannov lives in Akademgorodok, a faded former center of Soviet scientific might, his company does almost all its work for clients in the United States and Europe.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pennzoil in Joint Russian Enterprise: Pennzoil Co. announced a joint enterprise to develop an oil field in western Siberia in Russia. The joint enterprise, Siberian American Oil Co., will develop the West Mogotlorsk oil field in the Tyumen region. The field was discovered in 1986. The Russian partner in the joint enterprise is the Agansk Geological Enterprise, based in Novoagansk, Siberia, which will be the base of operations for the field.
WORLD
March 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia's Supreme Court rejected an appeal over the route of a controversial Siberian oil pipeline that will go past Lake Baikal, the world's most voluminous freshwater lake, an environmental campaigner said. The high court ruled that a government decision in December authorizing the construction of the 2,550-mile pipeline taking oil to lucrative Asian markets was legitimate, said Mikhail Krendlin of the Russian branch of Greenpeace. The Kremlin-backed, 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The first jointly curated Soviet-North American exhibit every organized, "Crossroads of Continents," opens Sept. 23 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1994 | Compiled by Jack Searles
Benton Oil & Gas Co. has decided to move its headquarters from Oxnard to Carpinteria. The company will occupy most of a 25,000-square-foot building in the Santa Barbara County community. Benton, an independent exploration and production firm, will relocate in February mainly because it needs more room for its administrative operations, the company said.
TRAVEL
November 11, 2007 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Maybe when you win a 22,000-mile race, you're entitled to a 100-year victory lap. That seems to be the case, at least, with the Thomas Flyer, the battle-scarred early automobile that prevailed in the first intercontinental car race in 1908. That race ran from New York to Paris. But Reno -- through which the Flyer almost passed on its journey 99 years ago -- is the scene of its celebration now. From Nov. 8 until Jan.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty-one coal miners were killed in a huge underground explosion in Siberia on Tuesday, leaving Russia in mourning after one of the worst mining catastrophes in its history. A methane blast, whose precise cause authorities pledged to investigate, ripped through the Zyryanovskaya coal mine in western Siberia at 1 a.m., after a new shift of workers had come down the shaft to start work but before the previous shift had left. "There are about 100 rescue workers at the site," said Col.
SPORTS
February 17, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
A Russian biathlon star who tested positive for a stimulant said to increase endurance as well as tolerance to cold was stripped Thursday of a silver medal and thrown out of the Turin Games, the first athlete tripped up in the tightest doping protocols in Winter Games history. Olga Pyleva, 30, one of Russia's leading biathletes, with gold and bronze medals from the 2002 Salt Lake City Games, tested positive for the stimulant cardephon after finishing second Monday in the 15-kilometer event.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | JACK SEARLES
Despite Boris N. Yeltsin's political troubles, two Ventura County companies have successfully taken major steps in separate oil-related deals in Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union. Both firms--Oxnard-based Benton Oil and Gas Co. and Oil Country Manufacturing Inc. of Ventura--say they have encountered no new hurdles in connection with the turmoil besetting Yeltsin's Russian regime.
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