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WORLD
August 23, 2009 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
An official says 17 more bodies have been found at a Siberian hydroelectric power plant, raising the death toll from an accident there to 64. Regional emergency official Dmitry Kudryatsev says rescuers draining the turbine room where the accident happened found the bodies. He said 11 workers still were missing at the Sayano-Shushenskaya plant.
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SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A 30,000-year-old giant virus has been revived from the frozen Siberian tundra, sparking concern that increased mining and oil drilling in rapidly warming northern latitudes could disturb dormant microbial life that could one day prove harmful to man. The latest find, described online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, appears to belong to a new family of mega-viruses that infect only amoeba. But its revival in a laboratory stands as “a proof of principle that we could eventually resurrect active infectious viruses from different periods,” said the study's lead author, microbiologist Jean-Michel Claverie of Aix-Marseille University in France.
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OPINION
March 18, 1990
Statues of Marx, Lenin and Stalin uprooted from village squares. What is to be done? Plant them in a circle on a barren Siberian plain. Marx-henge. CARL NOLL Riverside
SCIENCE
November 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Thanks to vaccination efforts, smallpox - killer of hundreds of millions people around the world over the course of the 20th century alone - was eradicated in 1979.  But even today the lethal variola virus, which causes the disease, is not completely impossible to come by. A team of French and Russian researchers recently found new snippets of smallpox DNA in 300-year-old mummies from Siberia, according to an article in the New England Journal...
BOOKS
October 11, 1987 | Tom Clark, Clark is the author of "The Exile of Celine" (Random House). and
"Cigarettes" is Harry Mathews' fourth novel, his first in 12 years. It follows "The Conversions" (1962) and "Tlooth" (1966), both now resurrected from out-of-print oblivion by the same publisher that recently also reissued Mathews' third novel, "The Sinking of the Odradek Stadium" (1975). That early trio of books can now be seen as a unit, and probably a closed chapter in the novelist's career. Certainly their shared characteristics make them unique in American fiction. A blend of wild intellectual comedy and bizarre fantasy, arcane data and flamboyant verbal gamesmanship, they are disarming and delightful works with few precedents in the language.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | Associated Press and
Eleven coal miners trapped by flooding in a western Siberian mine have drowned, the labor newspaper Trud reported Friday. Trud blamed the accident, which happened last Sunday, on safety violations.
NEWS
January 29, 1985 | From United Press International
A blast of cold air dubbed the "Siberian Express" pushed into the Northern Plains today, carrying blustery near-blizzard conditions into North Dakota and Montana. Drivers were warned of near-blizzard conditions--snow and northerly winds of 20-35 m.p.h.--in western and central North Dakota. Blowing and drifting snow was also a hazard in Montana, where localized blizzard conditions were expected in the mountain passes. A winter storm watch was issued for portions of South Dakota and Wyoming.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | Associated Press
Fires raging for more than a month in southeastern Siberia have destroyed thousands of acres of forest and continue to burn in a drought-stricken area east of Lake Baikal, a Soviet newspaper reported Tuesday. Farm Life newspaper said the fires began April 1 after a long, dry period in the Trans-Baikal region of Chita, about 200 miles north of Mongolia and China.
FOOD
February 4, 1993 | ROSE DOSTI
Patte Barham's "Peasant to Palace"(Romar Books) will make you want to sing " Ochi Chernye ," kick up your legs in a kazatska and cook blinis , kasha , stuffed cabbage and borscht dolloped with sour cream. It's not that the recipes are wonderfully different or even particularly exciting. It's the stories behind the recipes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1988 | DANIEL R. COWDEN, Daniel R. Cowden, a resident of Eagle River, Alaska, is currently completing his doctorate in public administration at USC. and
Shortly after President Reagan and Secretary Gorbachev meet in Moscow, an event of profound symbolic significance will take place at the opposite end of the vast Soviet landscape. An Alaska Airlines 737 jetliner will sojourn from Nome to the Soviet city of Provideniya on the Bering Sea. This "friendship flight" will be carrying the governor of Alaska, the state's congressional delegation and about 100 Americans of Siberian Yupik Eskimo heritage from St. Lawrence Island and the Alaska mainland.
WORLD
September 6, 2012 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Vladimir Putin, Russia's macho president, is at it again. The head of state has famously tranquilized a tiger, attached a tracking device to a whale and rode a horse bare-chested, feats that helped boost his popularity. This week, dressed in a white coverall, he flew a motorized hang glider to teach endangered Siberian cranes a new migration path. A report on state-run television showed the usually icy Putin looking exhilarated as he soared Wednesday with a co-pilot around a field near the Siberian town of Salekhard, about 1,200 miles northeast of Moscow.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Leon Legothetis
“I never make stupid mistakes.  Only very, very clever ones.” --John Peel I have skills. Navigating around Siberia is evidently not one of them. Today we drove from the eastern Kazakhstani city of Karaganda to somewhere in Siberia. I say somewhere because I currently have no idea where we are. And this, my friends, is entirely my fault. During our long trip from Britain, Steve has been the designated navigator. There is very good reason for this. He trained to be a scientist (now he is a cameraman)
SCIENCE
February 24, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A plant that was frozen in Siberian permafrost for about 30,000 years has been revived by a team of Russian scientists - and borne fruit, to boot. Using tissue from immature fruits buried in fossil squirrel burrows some 90 feet below the surface, researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences in Pushchino managed to coax the frozen remains of a Silene stenophylla specimen into full flower, producing delicate white blooms and then fruit. The findings, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describe what is a record for reviving presumably dead plant tissue - and may provide clues as to what makes some plants hardier and longer-lived than others.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In Peter Weir's "The Way Back," which opened late last month for a brief Oscar-qualifying run and releases again on Jan. 21, a group of prisoners escapes a Stalin-era Siberian gulag by walking all the way to India. The film is structured very much as an ensemble, with equal moments given to Ed Harris, Saoirse Ronan, Colin Farrell and others, but it is British-born actor Jim Sturgess, portraying a Polish prisoner named Janusz, who is in many ways the audience's point of entry. The story not only opens with him, but also his character's desire to return to his wife is the emotional fulcrum on which the action moves.
NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With "The Way Back," filmmaker Peter Weir tells the rather unfathomable story of a group of escapees from a 1940 Siberian gulag walking ? yes, walking ? thousands upon thousands of miles to India. Over snowy mountains, through parched desert, the small band (portrayed by a troupe of actors including Jim Sturgess, Ed Harris, Colin Farrell and Saoirse Ronan) make their way uneasily onward. The Australian-born-and-based Weir is a six-time Academy Award nominee and four-time Directors Guild nominee, and "The Way Back" marks his first film since "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World" in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2009 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post.
Esther Hautzig, whose memoir of growing up in exile in Siberia, "The Endless Steppe," has become a classic of children's literature, died Nov. 1 at a New York City hospital. She was 79 and had Alzheimer's disease. Hautzig was born into comfortable circumstances in Vilnius, Lithuania, then part of Poland, where her family ran a jewelry store. In 1941, after the Soviet Union and Germany signed a nonaggression pact that put Vilnius under Soviet control, Hautzig's family was arrested for being capitalists.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | Associated Press
An explosion on the Siberian gas pipeline caused by a sharp drop in temperature destroyed 2 1/2 miles of pipe, the Tass news agency said last week. Tass said there were no injuries in the blast, which occurred near the Siberian city of Norilsk, 1,600 miles northeast of Moscow.
WORLD
August 23, 2009 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
An official says 17 more bodies have been found at a Siberian hydroelectric power plant, raising the death toll from an accident there to 64. Regional emergency official Dmitry Kudryatsev says rescuers draining the turbine room where the accident happened found the bodies. He said 11 workers still were missing at the Sayano-Shushenskaya plant.
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