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Sibghatullah Mojaddidi

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NEWS
August 11, 1989
President Sibghatullah Mojaddidi of the Afghan rebels' self-proclaimed government-in-exile branded his own foreign minister, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, a "killer" of innocent Afghans and other guerrillas. Mojaddidi said his regime would have a better chance of survival without Hekmatyar, leader of the powerful Hezb-i-Islami resistance group. "He considers himself the hero of the jihad (holy war), but in fact . . .
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NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a handshake, a blessing and a thousand-gun salute, religious scholar Sibghatullah Mojaddidi was installed Tuesday as president of an Islamic Afghan government, after three days of fierce urban combat by a moderate coalition of guerrilla fighters cleared the last Kabul strongholds of fundamentalists long enough to usher in the nation's latest hope for peace.
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NEWS
February 25, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Afghan guerrilla leaders ended a two-week assembly here Friday with a call for the United Nations and "all the nations of the Free World" to recognize their government in exile as the government of Afghanistan. Their new president, Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, said the exile government "represents all the Afghan people," and he pledged that it will move to new headquarters in Afghanistan "in one month, God willing."
NEWS
August 11, 1989
President Sibghatullah Mojaddidi of the Afghan rebels' self-proclaimed government-in-exile branded his own foreign minister, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, a "killer" of innocent Afghans and other guerrillas. Mojaddidi said his regime would have a better chance of survival without Hekmatyar, leader of the powerful Hezb-i-Islami resistance group. "He considers himself the hero of the jihad (holy war), but in fact . . .
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a handshake, a blessing and a thousand-gun salute, religious scholar Sibghatullah Mojaddidi was installed Tuesday as president of an Islamic Afghan government, after three days of fierce urban combat by a moderate coalition of guerrilla fighters cleared the last Kabul strongholds of fundamentalists long enough to usher in the nation's latest hope for peace.
WORLD
May 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A veteran Afghan official said Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar might be ready to make peace and that the government should welcome him. Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, the head of a peace commission, said he would negotiate with any Afghans ready to lay down their arms and recognize the new government. Mojaddidi said Omar and warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, both wanted as terrorists by the U.S., should be eligible for reconciliation.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Acting President Sibghatullah Mojaddidi stepped down peacefully under an agreement by the major guerrilla factions for transforming Afghanistan into an Islamic state. Leaders on the council that will guide Afghanistan to national elections immediately handed power to Mojaddidi's previously designated successor, Burhanuddin Rabbani, head of Jamaat-i-Islami, one of the strongest guerrilla factions.
WORLD
October 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen Afghans and one Iranian arrived in Afghanistan after being released from the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, an Afghan official said. The Afghans appeared at a news conference alongside Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, head of Afghanistan's reconciliation commission, which assists with the release of detainees from Guantanamo and the U.S. prison at the Bagram military base north of Kabul, the Afghan capital.
NEWS
March 9, 1989
Afghan rebels said they captured the airport and some suburbs of the strategic eastern city of Jalalabad, and a rebel leader said he hopes his interim government will soon be able to meet in the city. Guerrilla sources said the rebel moujahedeen captured Samarkhel, about six miles southeast of the city. Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, president of the guerrilla interim government, said the rebels captured the Jalalabad airport and "are already infiltrating the city."
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | From Times wire services
Afghan rebels elected a moderate party leader, Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, as president of an interim government they want to take power in Kabul, state-run Pakistan television said today. It said a rebel consultative council elected a Muslim fundamentalist, Abdurrab Rasul Sayyaf, as prime minister of a government to replace the Soviet-backed administration in the Afghan capital.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Afghan guerrilla leaders ended a two-week assembly here Friday with a call for the United Nations and "all the nations of the Free World" to recognize their government in exile as the government of Afghanistan. Their new president, Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, said the exile government "represents all the Afghan people," and he pledged that it will move to new headquarters in Afghanistan "in one month, God willing."
WORLD
January 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
This country's constitutional convention came off the rails Thursday as officials adjourned the gathering in the face of a boycott by opponents of President Hamid Karzai. The delay was the most severe setback yet to this war-ravaged nation's attempt to put its vision of a secure future on paper, raising real concern that the historic gathering would end in failure.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | From Associated Press
A rocket slammed into a Kabul airport runway Friday as a plane carrying interim President Sibghatullah Mojaddidi and 69 other people taxied in after landing. No one was seriously hurt, airport officials said. The co-pilot on the flight from Pakistan was cut in the arm by shrapnel that pierced the cockpit window, officials said. Two other rockets, fired from north of the airport, missed. No one claimed responsibility for the late-afternoon attack.
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