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Sichuan Province

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
"China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province," which premieres on HBO tonight, is a heartbreaking example of what can only be called "Testimonial Television." Almost a year after an earthquake in central China killed an estimated 70,000 people -- 10,000 of them children -- there is nothing to find among the rubble except sorrow and rage.
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WORLD
April 19, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
 BEIJING -- A strong earthquake struck China's Sichuan province on Saturday morning, state media said, and early reports from the scene indicated significant injuries and at least 41 deaths. The earthquake's epicenter was about 80 miles southwest of the provincial capital, Chengdu, in Lushan County near the small city of Yaan. Chinese television said at least 41 people were killed and 600 injured. Authorities warned that the death toll could rise sharply. But the damage did not appear anywhere close in scale to that of a 2008 earthquake nearby that caused nearly 90,000 deaths, one of the worst natural disasters in recent Chinese history.
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FOOD
July 14, 1988 | GARY ADERMAN, United Press International
Take-out Chinese food is common around the world. But only in China's Sichuan Province do you find take-out Chinese chefs. The export trade in chefs is the responsibility of Chen Kehao, 42, a well-fed official who specializes in sending Sichuan chefs to restaurants around the globe, wherever there is a demand for the 20-centuries-old peppery fare from southwestern China.
WORLD
December 7, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
If pandas weren't so darn cute, we wouldn't be up in the clouds at the edge of a mountain ravine slick with moss and mud, clinging for life to shoots of bamboo. And get this: There is almost zero chance that we'll actually see a panda. We keep our eyes on the ground, not just to keep from falling, but because the best we can hope for is to discover panda droppings (and even the chances of that aren't so hot). "To be honest, I've been working in these mountains for 20 years and I've never seen a panda in the wild," says Dai Bo, 43, a wildlife biologist with China's Forestry Ministry who's wearing a camouflage jacket and hiking boots and has a zoom-lens Canon around his neck, just in case.
TRAVEL
April 23, 1989 | PETER CROSBY, Crosby is a Los Angeles free-lance writer currently working in Tokyo .
I knelt down beside fried dough twists, jasmine tea and a bowl of candies. The Tibetans watched me closely. As instructed, I used my thumbnail to scoop yak butter from the oiled wood tub and drop the yellow, waxy gobs into my tea. Yak butter tea is a staple for Tibetan nomads and an honor for distinguished guests. I did not consider myself distinguished, just one of the first foreigners to visit the Tibetan Highlands area of China in almost 25 years. Boojum Expeditions of San Diego had negotiated for two years to get permission from the People's Republic of China to explore northwestern Sichuan Province on horseback.
NEWS
May 5, 2009
Sichuan baby boom: In Sunday's Section A, two photos of the Luo family with an article about a baby boom in China's Sichuan province should have been credited to Leo Chen for The Times, not to The Times' Barbara Demick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989 | From Reuters
A 30-minute hailstorm killed at least 45 people and injured about 120 in a southwestern China city Thursday, New China News Agency reported. The storm in Luzhou, Sichuan province, damaged houses, cut water and power supplies and telephone lines. It also uprooted trees.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Hailstorms that battered wide areas of southwest Sichuan province over a 10-day period killed 157 people and injured 6,000, the newspaper China Daily said Wednesday. The storms, which hit 105 of the province's 175 counties from April 20 through last week, also destroyed 170,000 houses, the English-language newspaper said. Earlier reports had put the death toll from the storms at 87.
TRAVEL
November 27, 2005
WHY look for a company when you can assemble your own tour group? That's what Albert Huen and about 20 friends did for a trip last month to China. The two-week journey took them through regions that Western tourists don't visit frequently, including the Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong valleys in Sichuan province. It was when traveling between these two scenic spots that Huen, a retired physicist from Camarillo, took this picture with his Canon EOS 10D. It was about 6:30 a.m.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | United Press International
About 100 giant pandas threatened with starvation in China's largest nature reserve will be taken 450 miles to a new mountain home where there is plenty of bamboo to eat, the official People's Daily newspaper said Tuesday. The People's Daily said the pandas will be taken from the Wolong Nature Reserve in Sichuan province to Shennongjia in Hubei province, about 450 miles to the east, where the climate is similar.
WORLD
October 23, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Shopkeepers peer out from storefronts festooned with traditional Tibetan prayer flags at platoons of armed police, some carrying an unusual addition to their riot regalia: fire extinguishers. A string of self-immolations by young Buddhist monks in Sichuan province is unnerving the Chinese government and giving a new, more radical momentum to the Tibetan protest movement. On Monday, the ninth young Tibetan — and the first woman — killed herself in the small town of Aba by self-immolation in a protest against Chinese rule.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Chinese authorities struggled to restore order Monday after migrant workers, angry over the manhandling of a pregnant vendor, overturned police cars, smashed windows and set fires near the southern manufacturing hub of Guangzhou. It began as a run-of-the mill altercation Friday night when city authorities tried to clear the migrants, who are from Sichuan province, as they hawked produce in front of a supermarket in Zengcheng, on the outskirts of Guangzhou. But the ferocity of the rioting over the weekend exposed the fragility of social order in the nation.
WORLD
October 23, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Protests by Tibetan students over plans to elevate Chinese to the main language of instruction in western China schools spread Friday to Beijing, where students at a minority university staged a rare public demonstration. Earlier in the week, as many as 9,000 people protested in Tibetan communities in Qinghai and Sichuan provinces with banners reading "Equality for minorities; equality for languages. " The protests were set off by plans of education officials in Qinghai to use only Chinese-language teaching materials except for language lessons in Tibetan and English.
WORLD
August 22, 2009 | Barbara Demick
Like many mothers, Li Shubing despaired over her inability to control her teenage son. The 14-year-old often stayed out all night playing games in an Internet cafe. He neglected his studies. So when she learned of summer camp in rural Sichuan province that was promising to cure Internet addiction, she enrolled her son for a one-month course at $715. No matter that the camp boasted extreme methods -- "suffering can help a person improve," read one of the advertisements -- Li thought a little discipline would be just the ticket to whip her son into shape.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
"China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province," which premieres on HBO tonight, is a heartbreaking example of what can only be called "Testimonial Television." Almost a year after an earthquake in central China killed an estimated 70,000 people -- 10,000 of them children -- there is nothing to find among the rubble except sorrow and rage.
NEWS
May 5, 2009
Sichuan baby boom: In Sunday's Section A, two photos of the Luo family with an article about a baby boom in China's Sichuan province should have been credited to Leo Chen for The Times, not to The Times' Barbara Demick.
WORLD
August 22, 2009 | Barbara Demick
Like many mothers, Li Shubing despaired over her inability to control her teenage son. The 14-year-old often stayed out all night playing games in an Internet cafe. He neglected his studies. So when she learned of summer camp in rural Sichuan province that was promising to cure Internet addiction, she enrolled her son for a one-month course at $715. No matter that the camp boasted extreme methods -- "suffering can help a person improve," read one of the advertisements -- Li thought a little discipline would be just the ticket to whip her son into shape.
WORLD
April 19, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
 BEIJING -- A strong earthquake struck China's Sichuan province on Saturday morning, state media said, and early reports from the scene indicated significant injuries and at least 41 deaths. The earthquake's epicenter was about 80 miles southwest of the provincial capital, Chengdu, in Lushan County near the small city of Yaan. Chinese television said at least 41 people were killed and 600 injured. Authorities warned that the death toll could rise sharply. But the damage did not appear anywhere close in scale to that of a 2008 earthquake nearby that caused nearly 90,000 deaths, one of the worst natural disasters in recent Chinese history.
WORLD
April 19, 2009 | Barbara Demick
In the 11 months since China's devastating earthquake, Wang Tingzhang and his wife have been transformed from docile, law-abiding citizens into defiant troublemakers, at least in the eyes of authorities. Along the way, they've been pushed, punched, wiretapped, tailed and detained. Their offense? Asking too many questions about what happened to their only child, an 18-year-old girl who was buried under the rubble of her high school in the May 12 earthquake here in Sichuan province.
WORLD
June 19, 2008 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
The most famous refugees from last month's earthquake in Sichuan province lounge on their backs chewing long stalks of bamboo. Like bored celebrities, they shrug off the camera flashes on the other side of glass and the endless repetition of "Na'me ke'ai!" -- so cute! The eight young pandas at the Beijing Zoo were evacuated from the Wolong Nature Reserve, the world's largest panda breeding center, after the May 12 earthquake that killed 70,000 people and left about 5 million homeless.
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