Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSicily
IN THE NEWS

Sicily

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
February 21, 2010 | By Susan Spano
THE BEST WAY TO PALERMO From LAX, connecting service (change of planes) to Palermo, Italy, is available on Air France and Delta, connecting to Alitalia, Lufthansa and British. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $407. TELEPHONES To call the numbers below from the U.S., dial 011 (the international dialing code), 39 (country code for Italy) and the local number. WHERE TO STAY Hotel Villa Mokarta, 84A Via Macello, Salemi, 0924-98-33-15, www.mokarta.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
After weeks of much-publicized and behind-the-scenes negotiations, an exhibition of Sicilian ancient treasures will open at the Cleveland Museum of Art on its originally scheduled date,  Sept. 29. The museum announced Thursday that Sicilian cultural authorities will allow the show, which was canceled last month, to go on - and without tacking on the proposed extra loan fees, Cleveland.com reported . As part of the deal, the Cleveland museum will loan work from its collection, including Caravaggio's "Crucifixion of Saint Andrew," to Sicily in 2015.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Relations between Italy and Los Angeles' J. Paul Getty Museum seemed to be smoothing when Sicily lent the museum antiquities for a major exhibition, "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome. " The show of more than 100 ancient treasures opened April 3 at the Getty Villa and was to move to the Cleveland Museum of Art in late September, with the two museums sharing exhibition costs. Then Sicily called. It wanted its art back. The absence of the antiquities was hurting Sicily's tourism dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Cleveland Museum of Art has come to a decision about the exhibition "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome. " It's not traveling from the Getty Villa to the Ohio museum this fall. The show of more than 100 ancient treasures opened April 3 at the Getty Villa and was to move to Cleveland in late September, with the two museums to share exhibition costs. Then Sicily requested the antiquities be returned to Italy because their absence was hurting the region's tourism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Cleveland Museum of Art has come to a decision about the exhibition "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome. " It's not traveling from the Getty Villa to the Ohio museum this fall. The show of more than 100 ancient treasures opened April 3 at the Getty Villa and was to move to Cleveland in late September, with the two museums to share exhibition costs. Then Sicily requested the antiquities be returned to Italy because their absence was hurting the region's tourism.
TRAVEL
March 6, 2010 | From The Los Angeles Times
Hotline for wildflower sites Regarding "Just Add Water and Apply a Gentle Heat," by Benoit LeBourgeois, Feb. 28: Another great way to follow wildflower blooms in the California deserts, as well as Central and Southern California, is to utilize the annual wildflower hotline operated by the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants. Twenty-four hours a day, March 5 through May, anyone can call the Theodore Payne Wildflower Hotline at (818) 768-3533 or http://www.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
Richard Sullivan and traveling companion Rhoda Lurie got a taste of the past and present during their trip to Sicily in June. The pair visited the Valley of the Temples in Agrigento, where sculptures by contemporary Polish artist Igor Mitoraj are on display. In this photo, the Santa Monica resident juxtaposed one of Mitoraj's sculptures with the Temple of Concordia, built in the 4 th century BC. To Sullivan, the sculptures symbolized the ghosts of past residents of the ancient city.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2001
Let me wholeheartedly endorse Camille Cusumano's article "Embracing Sicily in Her Many Forms" (Feb. 18). After a lifetime of travel, Sicily is the one place we would return to without hesitation. The stay at the Dominican Palace in Taormina is a "happening." The food in Sicily is without peer and the people warm and welcoming. Bravo, Sicily. HAL CHENETZ Camarillo A few years ago, we drove around Sicily for 10 days and enjoyed it immensely. The Greek structures are more abundant and in better shape than those in Greece.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2010 | By Susan Spano, Reporting from Malfa, Italy
I can stop looking now. I've found my dream island. It's Salina, one of seven small Aeolian Islands (also known as the Lipari Islands) cast up by volcanoes in the Tyrrhenian Sea about 50 miles north of Sicily. They're accessible only by helicopter or boat, so that keeps crowds at bay. All of them are enchanting, including the main island of Lipari, where my Italian grandfather was born. FOR THE RECORD: Salina, Italy: A Travel article Sunday about the Aeolian Islands, including Salina, reported that many residents immigrated to the U.S. around the turn of the 19th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The government of Sicily may be softening on its threat to cancel a major exhibition of antiquities that was set to open at the Cleveland Museum of Art in late September after showing at the Getty Villa. Sicilian cultural authorities had threatened to cancel the Cleveland exhibition of  “Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome,” saying the absence of certain key objects has hurt tourism to Sicily.  If the Cleveland exhibition was canceled, the J. Paul Getty Museum would be left to foot the bill for Cleveland's share of expenses - about $300,000 more than it had planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Relations between Italy and Los Angeles' J. Paul Getty Museum seemed to be smoothing when Sicily lent the museum antiquities for a major exhibition, "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome. " The show of more than 100 ancient treasures opened April 3 at the Getty Villa and was to move to the Cleveland Museum of Art in late September, with the two museums sharing exhibition costs. Then Sicily called. It wanted its art back. The absence of the antiquities was hurting Sicily's tourism dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Sicily wants its art back, and the demand -- which the J. Paul Getty Museum said it would honor -- would leave the museum on the hook for an extra $300,000. A major exhibition of antiquities, “Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome,” is at the center of an international art mishap. The show of more than 100 ancient treasures that opened April 3 at the Getty Villa was to move to the Cleveland Museum of Art in late September, with the two museums sharing exhibition costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The government of Sicily may be softening on its threat to cancel a major exhibition of antiquities that was set to open at the Cleveland Museum of Art in late September after showing at the Getty Villa. Sicilian cultural authorities had threatened to cancel the Cleveland exhibition of  “Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome,” saying the absence of certain key objects has hurt tourism to Sicily.  If the Cleveland exhibition was canceled, the J. Paul Getty Museum would be left to foot the bill for Cleveland's share of expenses - about $300,000 more than it had planned.
TRAVEL
April 14, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
SICILY Slide show Photographer Warner LeMenager will look at Sicily's capital city, Palermo, and nearby Monreale, with its magnificent cathedral and cloister. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. PACIFIC COAST TRAIL Slide show Shian Sung will offer tips for gear and planning and present a slide show on his five-month hike from the Mexican border to the Canadian border, a distance of 2,650 miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
There are at least three great reasons to see "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome," the newly opened antiquities exhibition at the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades. A major sculpture anchors each of the show's three rooms, and together they tell an accelerating story of artistic and social power on the ancient Mediterranean island. Chronologically, the first is a straightforward male torso, his finely chiseled marble body quietly brimming with latent energy. Second comes a preening charioteer, physically just larger than life but expressively very much so. And third is a depiction of a minor god with major fertility on his mind, his powerful physicality an embodiment of the contortions of carnal lust, both corporeal and psychological.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Super-sized exhibitions are becoming more common in art museums, and the next few months will see several among the notable new shows opening around town. Chronologically, here's a selection of what's coming up in art this spring, including three really big shows: "War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath" Annenberg Space for Photography, March 23-June 2 Some war photographs are indelibly printed in America's cultural memory, such as Joe Rosenthal's carefully choreographed 1945 picture of the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima or Huynh Cong "Nick" Ut's image of a naked Vietnamese girl running from a napalm attack in 1972 (both for the Associated Press)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Sicily wants its art back, and the demand -- which the J. Paul Getty Museum said it would honor -- would leave the museum on the hook for an extra $300,000. A major exhibition of antiquities, “Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome,” is at the center of an international art mishap. The show of more than 100 ancient treasures that opened April 3 at the Getty Villa was to move to the Cleveland Museum of Art in late September, with the two museums sharing exhibition costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
There are at least three great reasons to see "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome," the newly opened antiquities exhibition at the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades. A major sculpture anchors each of the show's three rooms, and together they tell an accelerating story of artistic and social power on the ancient Mediterranean island. Chronologically, the first is a straightforward male torso, his finely chiseled marble body quietly brimming with latent energy. Second comes a preening charioteer, physically just larger than life but expressively very much so. And third is a depiction of a minor god with major fertility on his mind, his powerful physicality an embodiment of the contortions of carnal lust, both corporeal and psychological.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013
Timberlake is in studio Justin Timberlake fans have had a whirlwind Thursday since the musician-actor dropped an intriguing tweet teasing that new information would be coming at 9:01 a.m. That hour arrived, and despite speculation that Timberlake's first new solo music would be arriving immediately, he sent instead another missive with similarly veiled data: "To whom it may concern...I think I'M READY! #JT2013 http://tmbr.lk/imready," he wrote, directing fans to a clip of himself entering a recording studio and walking through its hallways.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By David Ng and Jason Felch
A terracotta head depicting the Greek god Hades that the J. Paul Getty Museum acquired in 1985 is being voluntarily sent back to Sicily, the museum has announced. Getty officials said that the museum has worked with officials from Sicily during the last two years to determine whether it would be appropriate to return the artifact. The museum said Thursday that the head's original location was the site of a sanctuary to the goddess Demeter in Sicily that was "clandestinely excavated" in the 1970s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|