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Sick Kids

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OPINION
July 6, 2006
UNTIL LAST WEEK, IT LOOKED as if Sacramento might use a fraction of this year's multibillion-dollar budget surplus to expand health coverage for more kids in California. But in their final budget negotiations, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Legislature decided that it was better to cave to a small group of vocal Republicans who believe that sick 3-year-olds should be punished for their parents' actions. There are an estimated 800,000 uninsured children in California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
January 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When kids begin sniffling, the first thing many parents reach for is Children's Tylenol. But that option has been off the table ? or, out of the medicine cabinet ? since a massive recall last year. Nine months later, the Johnson & Johnson unit that was responsible is still ironing out its problems, and there's little indication of when parents will be able to turn to the brand. But medical experts say that when it comes to treating sick kids, there are still plenty of options. "The nice thing about this situation is that there are other alternatives to name brands," said Dr. Daniel Frattarelli, chairman of pediatrics at Oakwood Hospital in Dearborn, Mich.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 1995 | AMY HARMON
Steven Spielberg's Starbright Foundation said Tuesday that it plans to develop an on-line computer network that aims to link seriously ill children in hospitals worldwide. A pilot program involving several U.S. hospitals is set to be launched this summer. Using high-speed telecommunications equipment and mobile computer workstations, the children will be able to dial into the network from their beds and talk to other kids logged into a three-dimensional "virtual playspace."
SPORTS
November 26, 2008 | T.J. SIMERS
We've got Thanksgiving this week, but no big deal, I give thanks every day of my life that I don't live in Angryville. I spend most days giving thanks. Thanks to the wife and daughter, for example, who will pack pillows on our five-hour drive to Arizona today, which will encourage them to fall asleep. Thanks for peace and quiet. I give thanks Hometown Buffet will be open to serve dinner Thursday knowing the other daughter will be trying to cook a turkey for the first time.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Sick kids are a $2-billion to $12-billion malaise for American business each year. That is the amount of money that child-care experts estimate it costs in lost productivity when parents are unable to work, held hostage by cold viruses, flu bugs, earaches and other ailments afflicting their young children. Baby sitters may be unavailable during the day, or may be unaffordable altogether for low-income parents. Relatives may not live close by. And sick kids are unwelcome in most day-care centers because their germs will spread.
HEALTH
January 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When kids begin sniffling, the first thing many parents reach for is Children's Tylenol. But that option has been off the table ? or, out of the medicine cabinet ? since a massive recall last year. Nine months later, the Johnson & Johnson unit that was responsible is still ironing out its problems, and there's little indication of when parents will be able to turn to the brand. But medical experts say that when it comes to treating sick kids, there are still plenty of options. "The nice thing about this situation is that there are other alternatives to name brands," said Dr. Daniel Frattarelli, chairman of pediatrics at Oakwood Hospital in Dearborn, Mich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Health officials are investigating what caused 93 Laguna Beach sixth-graders to fall ill with a stomach virus during a five-day trip to Santa Catalina Island last week. About 50 parents met Tuesday with Thurston Middle School Principal Chris Duddy to separate fact from rumor and to discuss possible changes when students make the trip next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990
I'm tired of reading so much mean press on Milli Vanilli. I was in Baltimore recently to visit a young niece who is very sick in the cancer ward at Johns Hopkins Hospital there. Rob and Fab made an impromptu visit to the cancer ward prior to a concert. For one hour they signed autographs and talked to many sick kids who otherwise would have never had the experience of seeing them in person. I was there with my 12-year-old son, and Rob and Fab arranged tickets for us and several of the nurses to see the show that night.
OPINION
July 11, 2006
Re " 'No' to sick kids," editorial, July 6 We agree: Health coverage for all our state's children makes sense on so many fronts -- economic, educational and public health among them. Front-end investment in health promotion and disease prevention is far less costly than rear-view remedial care. Healthy kids also perform better in school. And by providing childhood immunizations, we protect the public's health as well. Unfortunately, kids were allowed to be the political pawns in recent budget negotiations, drawn unnecessarily into the ugly debate around immigration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The singing star of The Learning Channel's "Rory and Me" helped a roomful of ill youngsters find their voices at Children's Hospital of Orange County on Thursday. The singer-songwriter and her three-man combo, Knock Your Socks Off, drew only muted audience participation at first from about 50 patients and parents. But when they broke into "It's a Crazy World," the young faces lit up as the children enthusiastically joined in on the refrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006 | Geoff Boucher
THE boy seemed destined to work in the dark. The son of a miner, he grew up in the 1940s under the bleak umbrella skies of South Wales in the village of Treforest, where local life was as hard as the coal and iron that sustained it. Thomas Jones Woodward was expected to join the other men in the mines, but tuberculosis changed that. He was bedridden for two years and then sent off to church with the girls to learn to sing. He not only learned about singing, he learned about girls.
HEALTH
July 17, 2006 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
AT an age when many siblings will come to blows over an uneven division of ice cream, Joe, Vinny and Angelo Todaro have learned that, in life and in families, fairness is a complicated thing. It got that way on a spring afternoon in May 2000, when their now 7-year-old brother, Nino, was diagnosed with a rare and life-threatening genetic disorder.
OPINION
July 11, 2006
Re " 'No' to sick kids," editorial, July 6 We agree: Health coverage for all our state's children makes sense on so many fronts -- economic, educational and public health among them. Front-end investment in health promotion and disease prevention is far less costly than rear-view remedial care. Healthy kids also perform better in school. And by providing childhood immunizations, we protect the public's health as well. Unfortunately, kids were allowed to be the political pawns in recent budget negotiations, drawn unnecessarily into the ugly debate around immigration.
OPINION
July 6, 2006
UNTIL LAST WEEK, IT LOOKED as if Sacramento might use a fraction of this year's multibillion-dollar budget surplus to expand health coverage for more kids in California. But in their final budget negotiations, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Legislature decided that it was better to cave to a small group of vocal Republicans who believe that sick 3-year-olds should be punished for their parents' actions. There are an estimated 800,000 uninsured children in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2004 | Scott Sandell, Times Staff Writer
There's something about hockey goalies, a mutation in their DNA that makes them want to get in the way of a frozen object traveling 90 mph. So it wasn't entirely surprising to see Bobby Farrelly -- half of the duo behind such offbeat films as "Dumb & Dumber," "There's Something About Mary" and "Stuck on You" -- between the pipes in a charity game at the L.A. Kings' El Segundo practice rink.
SPORTS
October 23, 2003 | T.J. Simers
The goal here, of course, is to give the Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA $500, and apparently the only one not in favor of this is TVG broadcaster Frank Lyons, and I guess now you know why he's called "Lyons the Loser." I'd go into the details, but why bother. The fact is the Loser just doesn't want the kids to have the money, and amazingly enough, he's doing everything he can to prevent it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2004 | Scott Sandell, Times Staff Writer
There's something about hockey goalies, a mutation in their DNA that makes them want to get in the way of a frozen object traveling 90 mph. So it wasn't entirely surprising to see Bobby Farrelly -- half of the duo behind such offbeat films as "Dumb & Dumber," "There's Something About Mary" and "Stuck on You" -- between the pipes in a charity game at the L.A. Kings' El Segundo practice rink.
SPORTS
November 26, 2008 | T.J. SIMERS
We've got Thanksgiving this week, but no big deal, I give thanks every day of my life that I don't live in Angryville. I spend most days giving thanks. Thanks to the wife and daughter, for example, who will pack pillows on our five-hour drive to Arizona today, which will encourage them to fall asleep. Thanks for peace and quiet. I give thanks Hometown Buffet will be open to serve dinner Thursday knowing the other daughter will be trying to cook a turkey for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2003 | Brenda Loree, Special to The Times
Eat out in Ojai and take your choice: The Ranch House, Suzanne's, Boccali's, Casa de Lagos. Eat out in Upper Ojai: Head for the Summit. But the cafe -- which exudes all the ambience of a '50s Dairy Queen -- is more than the community's sole restaurant. It also functions as town hall, infirmary, library, lonely hearts club, homework center, kennel and -- occasionally -- massage parlor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Health officials are investigating what caused 93 Laguna Beach sixth-graders to fall ill with a stomach virus during a five-day trip to Santa Catalina Island last week. About 50 parents met Tuesday with Thurston Middle School Principal Chris Duddy to separate fact from rumor and to discuss possible changes when students make the trip next year.
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