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Sickle Cell Anemia

NEWS
January 3, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Young black children in Florida appear to die from sickle cell disease at double the national rate, according to a new study. The research, reported in the government journal Public Health Reports, was based solely on death certificates and so could not explain the disparity between states. In contrast to Florida, death rates in Pennsylvania and Maryland were strikingly lower than the national average. "It's reasonable for the people in Florida to be somewhat concerned," said study author Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1996
A music festival featuring free bone marrow screenings will begin a monthlong campaign against sickle cell anemia today at the Lynwood Civic Center. Organized by more than two dozen groups, the concert marks the start of Sickle Cell Anemia Month and National Bone Marrow Month, in which residents are invited to register as potential marrow donors. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The discovery of the abnormal gene that causes an inherited disorder is normally viewed as the first--and most important--step toward developing an effective treatment, perhaps even a cure, for the disorder. Except for sickle cell disease. Sickle cell was the first disease for which scientists knew the precise genetic defect at its root.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A multinational team of researchers has found that bone marrow transplants are an effective cure for sickle cell anemia but only for a small group of people who can get the right marrow match from a sibling. A study of 22 carefully selected children with a severe form of the disease found that 16 were apparently cured by the transplant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under live oaks and towering sycamores on a ranch tucked away in the Santa Ana Mountains, 105 kids sing campfire songs, cook hot dogs and talk of life expectancy. The kids, at the oldest camp for sickle cell anemia patients in the country, have heard the odds--many die of the disease in childhood. But on Wednesday, KNBC-TV weatherman Christopher Nance, 41, who has the illness, told the campers to make their own odds, the way he did.
NEWS
August 24, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under towering live oaks and sycamores, on a ranch tucked away in the Santa Ana Mountains, 105 youngsters sing campfire songs, cook hot dogs and talk of life expectancy. The children, at the oldest camp for sickle cell anemia patients in the country, have heard the odds--many die of the disease in childhood. But Wednesday, KNBC-TV weatherman Christopher Nance, 41, who has the illness, told the campers to make their own odds, the way he did.
NEWS
March 5, 1995
As a child of five in Chicago, Camille McTeer Noldon was told she had sickle cell anemia and probably would die by the time she was 18. Now 36, she still struggles with the debilitating, hereditary blood disease but has learned to manage it better with the assistance of an experimental drug, Hydroxyurea, which she has been taking for three years in a clinical trial. Noldon, a Compton resident, talked with writer Catherine Gewertz. When I was five, I fell off a bar stool in our kitchen.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Individuals suffering from acute attacks of sickle cell anemia can receive the drug hydroxyurea from their physician as treatment for the debilitating blood disorder. Federal health officials recently found that hydroxyurea was effective in reducing the frequency of painful sickle cell anemia attacks. Daily doses of the drug also helped lower the need for hospitalization, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which released the test results Jan. 30.
NEWS
January 31, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials Monday announced a major breakthrough in the treatment of sickle cell anemia, a disabling blood disorder, saying that clinical studies of the first drug therapy against the disease showed a dramatic reduction in episodes of painful and sometimes life-threatening "crises" in adult patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1995
A sickle cell anemia self-help organization has appealed for $1,000 to bury a 1-year-old boy who died of the disease. "Whatever it takes to get this baby out of the morgue, that is what we're going to do," said Sister Somayah, an Islamic spiritualist representing Crescent Alliance Self-Help for Sickle Cell. The coroner's office "won't release the body until all arrangements have been made," Somayah said, adding that the organization already has raised $500 for the burial.
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