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Sicko

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009 | John Horn
The country is polarized, Michael Moore is Hollywood's most polarizing filmmaker, and almost everybody is agitated about the economy. Put it all together, and the timing for Moore's "Capitalism: A Love Story" couldn't be any more provocative. Moore's latest nonfiction jeremiad -- about the incestuous relationship between government and corporate America -- premieres in Los Angeles and New York on Wednesday with the kind of build-up usually reserved for "Spider-Man" sequels. On the heels of the film's raucous, ovation-filled screenings at the Venice and Toronto International film festivals, Moore will continue a high-profile publicity tour that includes appearances on "The Tonight Show," "The Oprah Winfrey Show," "The View" and one of television's stranger stops for an anti-consumption crusader, "The Martha Stewart Show."
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SPORTS
March 18, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Clay Matthews does not have two broken legs. Or even one for that matter. As far as we know, that is. Since when is it news when someone is not horribly injured? Ever since some sicko created a website that claims to allow other sickos to concoct fake news reports about "any player, any team, two broken legs in glorious traffic accident!" How nice. Apparently just one broken leg isn't quite horrific enough. Anyway, the alleged purpose of this site is to help fantasy football owners get a competitive advantage over everyone else in their league (a.k.a., cheat)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Michael Moore and his movies have always been hard to miss. But with "Sicko," his acidic new documentary about healthcare, there's suddenly less of the filmmaker and his usual methods. Not wanting the limelight, Moore is forgoing the competition at this year's Cannes Film Festival, where he won the top prize with 2004's "Fahrenheit 9/11." In "Sicko," he isn't chasing down insurance and pharmaceutical executives for confrontational interviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009 | John Horn
The country is polarized, Michael Moore is Hollywood's most polarizing filmmaker, and almost everybody is agitated about the economy. Put it all together, and the timing for Moore's "Capitalism: A Love Story" couldn't be any more provocative. Moore's latest nonfiction jeremiad -- about the incestuous relationship between government and corporate America -- premieres in Los Angeles and New York on Wednesday with the kind of build-up usually reserved for "Spider-Man" sequels. On the heels of the film's raucous, ovation-filled screenings at the Venice and Toronto International film festivals, Moore will continue a high-profile publicity tour that includes appearances on "The Tonight Show," "The Oprah Winfrey Show," "The View" and one of television's stranger stops for an anti-consumption crusader, "The Martha Stewart Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009
Change of bill: Baritone soloist Nathaniel Webster has canceled his May 31 concert with the Los Angeles Master Chorale because of illness. He'll be replaced at Walt Disney Concert Hall by baritone Daniel Teadt. Release date: Michael Moore's new film, an as- yet-untitled documentary about "the root causes of the global economic meltdown," will be released Oct. 2, Overture Films and Paramount Vantage said. His previous documentaries include "Roger and Me," "Bowling for Columbine" and "Sicko."
NEWS
December 10, 1987
Referring to the article "The Adoption Debate" by Elizabeth Mehren (Nov. 25), I believe that it is true that adoption agencies are not an option but a necessity when a girl is pregnant, young and unwed. And now reading in the article what can happen in an unsupervised situation, like private adoption, it seems obvious the agency is the better option. The counseling offered by agencies is a much needed help for the unwed mother to decide her own situation. The uncertain and perhaps lengthy time span offers adoptive parents even more satisfaction when they do get their child.
SPORTS
March 18, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Clay Matthews does not have two broken legs. Or even one for that matter. As far as we know, that is. Since when is it news when someone is not horribly injured? Ever since some sicko created a website that claims to allow other sickos to concoct fake news reports about "any player, any team, two broken legs in glorious traffic accident!" How nice. Apparently just one broken leg isn't quite horrific enough. Anyway, the alleged purpose of this site is to help fantasy football owners get a competitive advantage over everyone else in their league (a.k.a., cheat)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | David Germain, Associated Press
Academy Award-winning filmmaker Michael Moore is under investigation by the U.S. Treasury Department for taking ailing Sept. 11 rescue workers to Cuba for a segment in his upcoming healthcare documentary "Sicko." The investigation provides another contentious lead-in for a provocative film by Moore, a fierce critic of President Bush. In the past, Moore's adversaries have fanned publicity that helped the filmmaker create a new brand of opinionated blockbuster documentary.
HEALTH
July 9, 2007
Thank you for the article on "Sicko" ["Why 'Sicko' Hits a Nerve," July 2]. What a powerful movie and commentary on U.S. society. I am a high school teacher in Orange County and cannot afford to carry my sons on my health insurance. The district has priced insurance out of sight if you add dependents. Health care is an issue that affects all Americans. As Michael Moore so succinctly states in the movie, "me" needs to be replaced by "we." JONNA ROBINSON Orange
BUSINESS
June 16, 2007 | John Horn and Sheigh Crabtree, Special to The Times
Movie pirates are flooding the Web with bootlegged copies of "Sicko" two weeks before the Michael Moore healthcare documentary is due in theaters. The renegade filmmaker, whose previous targets have included General Motors in "Roger & Me" and the Bush administration in "Fahrenheit 9/11," Moore's incendiary view of the Iraq war, now finds himself the target of renegades who are widely sharing copies of his film. Weinstein Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009
Change of bill: Baritone soloist Nathaniel Webster has canceled his May 31 concert with the Los Angeles Master Chorale because of illness. He'll be replaced at Walt Disney Concert Hall by baritone Daniel Teadt. Release date: Michael Moore's new film, an as- yet-untitled documentary about "the root causes of the global economic meltdown," will be released Oct. 2, Overture Films and Paramount Vantage said. His previous documentaries include "Roger and Me," "Bowling for Columbine" and "Sicko."
HEALTH
July 7, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
STAY home if you're sick. That's the best way to stop the spread of contagious diseases, such as influenza, tuberculosis and gastrointestinal viruses. Besides, you can't do your job capably or safely if you don't feel well. But many Americans simply tough it out when ill, going to work with pain, cramps, headaches, fevers or worse. Often, they have no choice. As many as 43% of American workers in private industry don't have paid sick days, according to 2007 data from the federal government.
HEALTH
July 9, 2007
Thank you for the article on "Sicko" ["Why 'Sicko' Hits a Nerve," July 2]. What a powerful movie and commentary on U.S. society. I am a high school teacher in Orange County and cannot afford to carry my sons on my health insurance. The district has priced insurance out of sight if you add dependents. Health care is an issue that affects all Americans. As Michael Moore so succinctly states in the movie, "me" needs to be replaced by "we." JONNA ROBINSON Orange
HEALTH
July 2, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles premiere of "Sicko" at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater was over, the audience on their feet and the "stars" -- a.k.a. underserved, suffering patients and whistle-blowing insurance company employees -- had taken their bows. Michael Moore, wearing a suit-minus-tie and sans his signature cap, was looking at them with a paternal glow. Then came the lone question, shouted from the audience. "What do we do?" For Moore, it's a no-brainer. He wants the insurance industry out of the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
MICHAEL MOORE'S "Sicko" focuses on how profit motives keep Americans from receiving quality medical care. But health insurance companies aren't the only ones in the documentary with revenue at stake: Moore himself stands to make a mint on the film. Thanks to a lucrative contract negotiated with the Weinstein Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
NO one ever accused Michael Moore of not having a point of view. A master propagandist and disturber of the peace with an eye for pretense and hypocrisy, Moore can orchestrate outrage pro and con like no one else. It wasn't an accident that his "Fahrenheit 9/ll" was the highest-grossing documentary of all time; it was business as usual. Moore is back again examining America's healthcare system in the aptly named "Sicko."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | John Horn
Hollywood loves to hold movie premieres in unusual places -- on aircraft carriers, in Disneyland, inside Alcatraz. Michael Moore decided to unveil his new healthcare documentary "Sicko" in a locale few studio executives have ever visited: skid row. On Monday night, Moore and distributor the Weinstein Co. screened "Sicko" on the street in front of the Union Rescue Mission. About 200 clients of the mission and other homeless people attended the screening, which included free popcorn and sodas.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
NO one ever accused Michael Moore of not having a point of view. A master propagandist and disturber of the peace with an eye for pretense and hypocrisy, Moore can orchestrate outrage pro and con like no one else. It wasn't an accident that his "Fahrenheit 9/ll" was the highest-grossing documentary of all time; it was business as usual. Moore is back again examining America's healthcare system in the aptly named "Sicko."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | John Horn
Hollywood loves to hold movie premieres in unusual places -- on aircraft carriers, in Disneyland, inside Alcatraz. Michael Moore decided to unveil his new healthcare documentary "Sicko" in a locale few studio executives have ever visited: skid row. On Monday night, Moore and distributor the Weinstein Co. screened "Sicko" on the street in front of the Union Rescue Mission. About 200 clients of the mission and other homeless people attended the screening, which included free popcorn and sodas.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
With the release of Michael Moore's "Sicko," a movie once again is adding sizzle to an issue that's a high priority for liberal politicians -- this time comprehensive health insurance for all. But unlike Al Gore's film on global warming, which helped rally support on an equally controversial problem, "Sicko" is creating an awkward situation for the leading Democratic presidential candidates.
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