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Sid Avery

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He focused his lens on a grinning Marlon Brando enjoying toast and coffee at the breakfast table and later captured the brooding actor posing with his bongo drums in a corner of his living room. He shot a glistening Rock Hudson, fresh from the shower with a towel wrapped around his waist, talking on the phone. And he captured Elizabeth Taylor sitting in a folding chair on location in Texas for "Giant," eyes closed and face sensuously tilted upward as she caught some sun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
In the public eye, they lived a fantasy that mere mortals could only dream of. But between the ellipses of Rat Pack lore existed a carnival of leisure, stress, politics, starlets, heartache and happiness. For decades, some of the only photographic evidence was stashed in a cardboard box labeled "Do Not Print. " That is, until now. "The Rat Pack," a limited-edition volume by Reel Art Press, is a sprawling compilation of visual footnotes in the everyday world of Frank Sinatra and his band of brothers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Living in the age of full disclosure and ambushing paparazzi , one forgets that Hollywood was once protected by a system of image-control high powered enough for the White House. And, as a photographer for the Saturday Evening Post during the somnambulistic '50s, Sid Avery played an important role in helping manufacture the bizarre myth that was Hollywood during that goofy decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He focused his lens on a grinning Marlon Brando enjoying toast and coffee at the breakfast table and later captured the brooding actor posing with his bongo drums in a corner of his living room. He shot a glistening Rock Hudson, fresh from the shower with a towel wrapped around his waist, talking on the phone. And he captured Elizabeth Taylor sitting in a folding chair on location in Texas for "Giant," eyes closed and face sensuously tilted upward as she caught some sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't make rat packs like they used to. Just ask veteran photographer Sid Avery, who snapped a memorable image of Frank Sinatra and pals during the making of the original "Ocean's Eleven" and was cajoled into coming out of retirement to shoot George Clooney et al for the film's remake. "It was considerably different," says Avery, 83, with a chuckle. "That's not even a stretch."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991 | RON EGGERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most anyone today who takes a look at Frank Powolny's famous pinup shot of Betty Grable or Edward Steichen's shot of a veiled Gloria Swanson would recognize them as classic photographs that captured both a star and an era. But while treasured now among historians and collectors, such images were considered no more important when they were shot in the 1920s, '30s, '40s and '50s than the press releases that accompanied them. Their sole purpose was to sell the stars and their latest films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even those who pretend to be indifferent to the glitz of show biz can't help but be a bit dazzled by Hollywood lore, especially when it peels back the artifice and reveals the humanity. Who, for example, can remain blase in the presence of a photograph of a pants-less Paul Newman, pouring his morning coffee on a '50s movie set?
NEWS
February 28, 2002
* Palm Springs Desert Museum (101 Museum Drive, Palm Springs, [760] 325-7186). Tue.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. "On and Off the Set: Photographs by Sid Avery" features celebrity photos by Avery including Marlon Brando, above, enjoying toast and coffee in his Beverly Glen home in 1955, James Dean, Sammy Davis Jr., Steve McQueen and others. Through March 3. $3.50-$7.50.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990
Two film-related collections have been donated to the Margaret Herrick Library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. British director, producer and screenwriter Bryan Forbes donated copies of his published works and scripts, photographs and correspondence from "The Angry Silence," "Whistle Down the Wind," "The Wrong Box," "Seance on a Wet Afternoon," "The L-Shaped Room" and "King Rat," among other items.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1997
Works offered by auction by top photographers, including Sid Avery, Greg Gorman, Mary Ellen Mark, Annie Liebovitz, Sebastiao Salgado, Alfred Steiglitz and William Wegman, can be previewed through Wednesday (10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) at the G. Ray Hawkins Gallery in Santa Monica, 910 Colorado Ave. Both live and silent auctions of the works will be held Thursday from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Directors Guild in Hollywood, 7920 Sunset Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even those who pretend to be indifferent to the glitz of show biz can't help but be a bit dazzled by Hollywood lore, especially when it peels back the artifice and reveals the humanity. Who, for example, can remain blase in the presence of a photograph of a pants-less Paul Newman, pouring his morning coffee on a '50s movie set?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991 | RON EGGERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most anyone today who takes a look at Frank Powolny's famous pinup shot of Betty Grable or Edward Steichen's shot of a veiled Gloria Swanson would recognize them as classic photographs that captured both a star and an era. But while treasured now among historians and collectors, such images were considered no more important when they were shot in the 1920s, '30s, '40s and '50s than the press releases that accompanied them. Their sole purpose was to sell the stars and their latest films.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Living in the age of full disclosure and ambushing paparazzi , one forgets that Hollywood was once protected by a system of image-control high powered enough for the White House. And, as a photographer for the Saturday Evening Post during the somnambulistic '50s, Sid Avery played an important role in helping manufacture the bizarre myth that was Hollywood during that goofy decade.
NEWS
August 21, 1986
I was very much interested in the piece by Barbara Baird, "Archivists Rescue Images of Hollywood's Past" (Times, Aug. 10). It is impressive to know that the picture collection is in the competent hands of such an expert as Sid Avery, who was chief of the U.S. Army's Pictorial Service and Laboratory in London during World War II. I was very much aware of the operations of Mr. Avery's setup,for during the war I was an embryonic picture editor in the...
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