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Sid Caesar

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Sid Caesar was a comic pioneer on television, anchoring “Your Show of Shows” with his irreverent, often physical comedy. But the actor, who died Wednesday at 91 , also made his presence felt in a hit movie several decades later. In 1982's “My Favorite Year,” the character Stan “King” Kaiser (Joseph Bologna) is based on Caesar, a tough-minded actor on the movie's fictional variety show. Richard Benjamin's film looks at the arrival of a swashbuckling alcoholic actor named Allan Swann  (Peter O'Toole, channeling the spirit of Errol Flynn)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Susan King
Carl Reiner wakes up each morning with the same thought - it's time to start writing. It's still the top priority for the Emmy Award-winning funny man who created the landmark CBS sitcom "The Dick Van Dyke Show," wrote and directed such comedy film favorites as 1970's "Where's Poppa?," 1977's "Oh , God!" and 1979's "The Jerk" and who, along with his lifetime friend Mel Brooks, performed the "2000 Year Old Man" routines. "I get to my computer and I either play solitaire or do some tweets," said Reiner (who, for the record, has more than 62,000 Twitter followers)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2012 | By Susan King
The guys around the table call Sid Caesar "The King. " They're seated in a back room of Factor's Famous Deli on Pico Boulevard, a boisterous group of longtime Hollywood funnymen, enjoying their lunch, which is somewhere between a meal and a ritual. The legendary Caesar still has a place of honor even though he's frail and rarely speaks. As his friend and lunch pal Monty Hall - of "Let's Make a Deal" fame - notes, the 90-year-old Caesar wouldn't miss these lunches. "You know when he walks in we say, 'The King is here,'" said Hall, 91. "He loves that.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Comedian Sid Caesar, who died Wednesday at the age of 91, was a giant and genius of television. He came into the medium, in 1949, when it was still molten. He helped shape TV comedy, even as TV, with its new technical demands and advantages, shaped his work. Milton Berle, the man called Mr. Television, had started in TV the year before; but Berle, 14 years Caesar's senior and in vaudeville since age 12, was already an old pro. Caesar, whose television debut was in fact on Berle's "Texaco Star Theater," was a fast-rising newcomer, much of whose previous work had been under the auspices of the Coast Guard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | Dennis McLellan
In a day before comedy was laced with irony and studded with mean-spirited barbs, Sid Caesar was more than funny. He was hilariously, outrageously, tear-inducingly, gather-up-the-whole-family-for-this funny . A veteran of the Catskills with an elastic face, a knack for gibberish and a mind that could find comedy gold in the workings of a Bavarian cuckoo clock, Caesar was the king of live television sketch comedy in the 1950s. Some of the best writers - Carl Reiner, Neil Simon and Mel Brooks - vied to work for him. No slouches at comedy themselves, they were dazzled by his genius and, at times, horrified by his temper; he once tore the sink from a hotel bathroom and threatened to throw Brooks out an 18th-story window.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1987 | ROBERT BARR, Associated Press
Sid Caesar has this idea for a television show: It would be live. It would have comedy sketches. And wouldn't it be great if Imogene Coca were available? The pilot's done. He just can't get it on the air. "It hasn't been on yet," Caesar groused, "and it's been canceled three times." Time was when networks didn't play the "don't call us, we'll call you" game with Sid Caesar, the presiding genius on "Your Show of Shows" from 1950 to 1954.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Mel Tolkin, an award-winning television comedy writer who served as head writer for Sid Caesar's legendary "Your Show of Shows" and "Caesar's Hour" in the 1950s, died Monday. He was 94. Tolkin died of natural causes at his home in Century City, said his son, writer Michael Tolkin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Gary Belkin, a comedy writer who honed his skills on Sid Caesar's "Caesar's Hour" and went on to work for such television classics as "The Carol Burnett Show" and "Sesame Street," has died. He was 78. Belkin died Thursday in Los Angeles of emphysema, said his friend Mona Charles. The Bronx-born Belkin got into comedy by suggesting ideas for New Yorker cartoons and writing jokes for radio comedians, and soon broke into television on Caesar's variety show, which aired from 1954 to 1957.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Imagine buttonholing Beethoven, after an initial reading of his Ninth Symphony, and saying, "So, Ludwig . . . how about letting us in on how you dreamed that one up, huh?" Or opening with, "Tell me, Dr. Einstein, this time-space continuum thing . . . how do I explain it to my 8-year-old?" Humor is worse.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Woman (Imogene Coca): I think the old method of spanking a child is passe . Man (Sid Caesar): I say don't spank a child. Talk to the child, reason with him, find out what's on his mind. And when you find out the real reason, the cause-- then belt him. On a cluttered desk in his hilltop Beverly Hills home rests a nameplate bearing a self-mocking title: "His Caesarship." It fits.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Susan King
Two years ago, I had the pleasure of joining a group of funny men who meet for lunch and lively conversation every other Wednesday at Factor's Famous Deli on Pico Boulevard. A documentary about their meeting, aptly titled "Lunch," was making the rounds of festivals, and I was invited sit in with the veterans and soak in the experience. Sid Caesar, who died Wednesday at age 91, had the place of honor at the head of a table that also included Monty Hall of "Let's Make a Deal" fame, Gary Owens from "Laugh-In" and the Oscar-nominated director of "Love Story," Arthur Hiller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | Dennis McLellan
In a day before comedy was laced with irony and studded with mean-spirited barbs, Sid Caesar was more than funny. He was hilariously, outrageously, tear-inducingly, gather-up-the-whole-family-for-this funny . A veteran of the Catskills with an elastic face, a knack for gibberish and a mind that could find comedy gold in the workings of a Bavarian cuckoo clock, Caesar was the king of live television sketch comedy in the 1950s. Some of the best writers - Carl Reiner, Neil Simon and Mel Brooks - vied to work for him. No slouches at comedy themselves, they were dazzled by his genius and, at times, horrified by his temper; he once tore the sink from a hotel bathroom and threatened to throw Brooks out an 18th-story window.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Dennis McLellan
Sid Caesar, a television pioneer who reigned as the king of live TV sketch comedy in the 1950s with his inspired brand of mimicry, pantomime and satire on the classic comedy-variety series “Your Show of Shows” and “Caesar's Hour,” died Wednesday. He was 91. Caesar died at his home in Beverly Hills after a brief illness, according to his biographer and friend Eddy Friedfeld. A two-time Emmy Award-winning performer during his TV heyday in the '50s, Caesar has been hailed as “one of the great TV clowns,” “one of television's most inventive performers” and “a genius at making people laugh.” PHOTOS: Sid Caesar | 1922 - 2014 “Television had its share of comedy geniuses,” Times television critic Howard Rosenberg wrote in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Sid Caesar, who died Wednesday at the age of 91, had a career that spanned stage and screen, but it was on TV that he was best known. His first TV appearance was on Milton Berle's "Texaco Star Theater," but it was on the variety show program "Your Show of Shows" that he became famous. The show, which aired on NBC beginning in 1950, showcased Caesar's talents alongside other future comedy legends, including Carl Reiner, Imogene Coca and Howie Morris. Mel Brooks and Neil Simon were writers for the show, which grew from the vaudeville tradition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The late actor, comedian, writer and musician Sid Caesar was a comic Renaissance man. Though best known for the TV series "Your Show of Shows," he was also a regular presence on the stage and the big screen. Here's a look at five of his most memorable movie roles. "Tars and Spars. "  Caesar's first movie came out of his time in the Coast Guard, where he wrote and performed sketches for the service's musical revues. After playing a comic supporting role in the musical "Tars and Spars," about a would-be sailor who falls for a singer and woos her under the pretense he is a hero, Caesar was cast in the 1946 Columbia Pictures film adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Sid Caesar was a comic pioneer on television, anchoring “Your Show of Shows” with his irreverent, often physical comedy. But the actor, who died Wednesday at 91 , also made his presence felt in a hit movie several decades later. In 1982's “My Favorite Year,” the character Stan “King” Kaiser (Joseph Bologna) is based on Caesar, a tough-minded actor on the movie's fictional variety show. Richard Benjamin's film looks at the arrival of a swashbuckling alcoholic actor named Allan Swann  (Peter O'Toole, channeling the spirit of Errol Flynn)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1994 | RICK DU BROW
Ten years ago this spring, a New York museum came West with a collection of classic TV programs and gave Los Angeles what soon became an annual festival of note for couch potatoes and students of the medium. At the beginning, the Manhattan-based Museum of Broadcasting--now called the Museum of Television & Radio--was on somewhat uncertain ground with its Los Angeles expedition. Its first venture, in 1984, set up shop at the ABC Entertainment Center.
BOOKS
November 2, 2003 | Gerald Nachman, Gerald Nachman is the author of "Seriously Funny: The Rebel Comedians of the 1950s and 1960s."
From his lower middle-class boyhood in Yonkers, N.Y., through his later post-stardom traumas, Sid Caesar was perceived as inarticulate and painfully shy, nothing like the brash, comically eloquent on-camera personality that made him an icon in TV's now-dwindling pantheon of certifiable geniuses. He was really born too late -- a silent comic, more visual than verbal, capable of flickering comic moods, who tamed TV to fit him.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Into every generation a sketch comedy (sometimes two or three or more) is born. Indeed, we can write the cultural history of our times in their names, from Sid Caesar's "Show of Shows" to the variety shows of Carol Burnett and Flip Wilson, to "Saturday Night Live" and "SCTV," to "Kids in the Hall" and "In Living Color" and "Mad TV," to "Key & Peele" and "Incredible Crew," with many more in between and yet to come. The latest link in this chain of laffs is "The Birthday Boys," premiering Friday on IFC. Its eponymous stars work out of the L.A. Branch of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater (see also: "Upright Citizens Brigade," the late-'90s Comedy Central series that featured UCB co-founder Amy Poehler)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Susan King
The romantic comedy "Putzel," starring Melanie Lynskey and Susie Essman, will have its L.A. premiere as the opening night presentation at the eighth  Los Angeles Jewish Film Festiva l on June 1 at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills. Other films in the festival, which continues through June 6 at various locations, include the world premiere of Ron Frank's documentary "When Comedy Went to School," which looks at the legendary comedians who got their start in the resorts in the Catskill mountains, including Sid Caesar, Mel Brooks and Jackie Mason.
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