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January 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
After 85 years, the world's most famous movie theater will finally be living up to its name. Chinese TV maker TCL has paid more than $5 million for the naming rights to the venerable Grauman's Chinese Theatre opened in 1927 by showman Sid Grauman. The Hollywood Boulevard landmark will now be called the TCL Chinese Theatre, helping the Chinese company raise its profile. The theater is used almost weekly for red-carpet premieres, and draws nearly 4 million visitors a year. "This is one of the landmarks of North America," said Hao Yi, vice president of TCL Group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
SHANGHAI, China -- A new Imax short documentary on pandas, a 3-D Imax history of Hollywood, and live music or dance shows aimed at tourists are among the projects the owners of the TCL Chinese Theatre are pursuing to draw more visitors -- both American and Chinese -- to the iconic movie palace. Chinese TV maker TCL paid more than $5 million this year for the naming rights to the venerable Grauman's Chinese Theatre, opened in 1927 by showman Sid Grauman. The theater is now being converted to an Imax screen and is expected to reopen by September with stadium seating, as well as a new Imax sound system and digital projector.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2006
Oct. 23, 1928: Theater owner Sid Grauman said he would start producing talking pictures. Times Hollywood writer Grace Kingsley called the news "one of the most important announcements of the year" in the movie industry. "He will make feature-length pictures as well as novelties, he says....
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood's best-known theater is going dark for several months. The former Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood shut down this week for several months of renovations and a digital face lift. The storied theater held its final movie showing last week when it screened 'Iron Man 3,' which filmed a scene in the courtyard at the Chinese. On Monday, in its final act, the Chinese hosted a premiere for Netflix's  "Arrested Development. " PHOTOS: Hollywood's Chinese Theatre moments The theater, now called TCL Chinese Theatre - after the Chinese TV company that bought the rights to the name - is being remodeled to handle a giant Imax screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Anyone who tampers with Hollywood's most iconic venue is likely to encounter some suspicion. So it's not surprising that some residents have raised concerns about plans to bring a giant Imax screen to the former Grauman's Chinese Theatre. But one prominent theater conservation group says not to worry. The Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation, which raises funds to help conserve the city's historic movie palaces, says the planned Imax conversion won't affect the Chinese Theatre's historic character.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood's best-known theater is going dark for several months. The former Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood shut down this week for several months of renovations and a digital face lift. The storied theater held its final movie showing last week when it screened 'Iron Man 3,' which filmed a scene in the courtyard at the Chinese. On Monday, in its final act, the Chinese hosted a premiere for Netflix's  "Arrested Development. " PHOTOS: Hollywood's Chinese Theatre moments The theater, now called TCL Chinese Theatre - after the Chinese TV company that bought the rights to the name - is being remodeled to handle a giant Imax screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
SHANGHAI, China -- A new Imax short documentary on pandas, a 3-D Imax history of Hollywood, and live music or dance shows aimed at tourists are among the projects the owners of the TCL Chinese Theatre are pursuing to draw more visitors -- both American and Chinese -- to the iconic movie palace. Chinese TV maker TCL paid more than $5 million this year for the naming rights to the venerable Grauman's Chinese Theatre, opened in 1927 by showman Sid Grauman. The theater is now being converted to an Imax screen and is expected to reopen by September with stadium seating, as well as a new Imax sound system and digital projector.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Imax Corp., once a peripheral player in Hollywood, is putting its stamp on the industry's most famous movie theater. The Canadian big screen theater company, which has offices in Santa Monica, plans to open one of its largest theaters at the former Grauman's Chinese Theatre opened in 1927 by showman Sid Grauman, sources familiar with the matter said. The deal, which is signed but subject to permit approval by the city, comes three months after Chinese TV maker TCL paid more than $5 million for the naming rights to the historic theater along Hollywood Boulevard, which now goes by the name TCL Chinese Theatre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2002 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's ironic that in Hollywood, where history is written on the wind and where our product deteriorates with time ... the cement in Grauman's forecourt is the only lasting memorial to artists who've made Hollywood famous." --Hedda Hopper, Los Angeles Times, 1953 * With no video, no lasers and not a single moving part, the colored slabs of concrete at Grauman's Chinese Theatre present an eerie interactive experience.
NEWS
April 7, 1998
I was amused at the to-do about the lack of women's footprints in the forecourt of the Chinese theater ("More Women at Mann's?" March 22). What's really missing is the proud name of the visionary who actually built the place, a master showman who was a founding member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Sid Grauman's name was taken off his showplace and replaced in the '70s. The new owner wasted no time in making his mark on the world-renowned theater. He ripped out the trees, filled in the fountains and installed the teeny little plastic signs that whine his name over the majestic flashing neon dragon display marquees.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Anyone who tampers with Hollywood's most iconic venue is likely to encounter some suspicion. So it's not surprising that some residents have raised concerns about plans to bring a giant Imax screen to the former Grauman's Chinese Theatre. But one prominent theater conservation group says not to worry. The Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation, which raises funds to help conserve the city's historic movie palaces, says the planned Imax conversion won't affect the Chinese Theatre's historic character.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Imax Corp., once a peripheral player in Hollywood, is putting its stamp on the industry's most famous movie theater. The Canadian big screen theater company, which has offices in Santa Monica, plans to open one of its largest theaters at the former Grauman's Chinese Theatre opened in 1927 by showman Sid Grauman, sources familiar with the matter said. The deal, which is signed but subject to permit approval by the city, comes three months after Chinese TV maker TCL paid more than $5 million for the naming rights to the historic theater along Hollywood Boulevard, which now goes by the name TCL Chinese Theatre.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
After 85 years, the world's most famous movie theater will finally be living up to its name. Chinese TV maker TCL has paid more than $5 million for the naming rights to the venerable Grauman's Chinese Theatre opened in 1927 by showman Sid Grauman. The Hollywood Boulevard landmark will now be called the TCL Chinese Theatre, helping the Chinese company raise its profile. The theater is used almost weekly for red-carpet premieres, and draws nearly 4 million visitors a year. "This is one of the landmarks of North America," said Hao Yi, vice president of TCL Group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2006
Oct. 23, 1928: Theater owner Sid Grauman said he would start producing talking pictures. Times Hollywood writer Grace Kingsley called the news "one of the most important announcements of the year" in the movie industry. "He will make feature-length pictures as well as novelties, he says....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2002 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's ironic that in Hollywood, where history is written on the wind and where our product deteriorates with time ... the cement in Grauman's forecourt is the only lasting memorial to artists who've made Hollywood famous." --Hedda Hopper, Los Angeles Times, 1953 * With no video, no lasers and not a single moving part, the colored slabs of concrete at Grauman's Chinese Theatre present an eerie interactive experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cast in Stone: Sid Grauman used to invite movie stars to put their signatures and hand and footprints in cement squares outside his Chinese Theater in Hollywood. Now the owners of the three-theater Baldwin Hills Entertainment Complex are continuing the tradition. On Saturday at 1 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2006
April 26, 1928: The motion picture industry orchestrated an extravaganza to dedicate Los Angeles' new City Hall. Film producer Joseph Schenck was master of ceremonies, Sid Grauman ran the entertainment and Cecil B. DeMille arranged part of the celebratory parade, which, according to The Times, stretched over five miles and included a lion in a cage.
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