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Sid Jacobson

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I am a latecomer to graphic novels. Years ago, my truly literary friends tried to turn me on to the groundbreaking art of the "Sandman" books (Neil Gaiman and various artists) and "Love and Rockets" (Los Bros. Hernandez). I admit I felt about those books the way I feel about great horror movies: I could admire the art, but they did not make my heart sing. When I was editor of the Los Angeles Times Book Review in the 1990s, I tried without success to get one or another of those literary friends to commit their intriguing ideas about the emerging world of graphic novels to a piece for the Book Review, but they were apparently keeping their enthusiasms to themselves and their aficionados.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I am a latecomer to graphic novels. Years ago, my truly literary friends tried to turn me on to the groundbreaking art of the "Sandman" books (Neil Gaiman and various artists) and "Love and Rockets" (Los Bros. Hernandez). I admit I felt about those books the way I feel about great horror movies: I could admire the art, but they did not make my heart sing. When I was editor of the Los Angeles Times Book Review in the 1990s, I tried without success to get one or another of those literary friends to commit their intriguing ideas about the emerging world of graphic novels to a piece for the Book Review, but they were apparently keeping their enthusiasms to themselves and their aficionados.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2008 | Judith Lewis
WHEN writer Sid Jacobson and artist Ernie Colon turned the 9/11 Commission Report into a graphic novel two years ago, it seemed a sacrilegious mission. How could a policy document drafted with measured solemnity lend itself to sound effects like "BLAAMMM!" and "KA-POW!"? Would such a rendering not make mockery of the tragedy? And what would Jacobson and Colon do with all those detailed passages tracing U.S. security lapses going back to Iran-Contra?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2008 | Judith Lewis
WHEN writer Sid Jacobson and artist Ernie Colon turned the 9/11 Commission Report into a graphic novel two years ago, it seemed a sacrilegious mission. How could a policy document drafted with measured solemnity lend itself to sound effects like "BLAAMMM!" and "KA-POW!"? Would such a rendering not make mockery of the tragedy? And what would Jacobson and Colon do with all those detailed passages tracing U.S. security lapses going back to Iran-Contra?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2006 | From Reuters
The bestselling report by the commission that examined the Sept. 11 attacks is being adapted into a graphic book, which the publisher hopes will widen the audience for the panel's findings. "The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation" will be published in September. The independent bipartisan panel, informally known as the Sept. 11 commission, prepared an account of the 2001 attacks and made recommendations on guarding against future attacks.
SPORTS
August 21, 1996
More than 100 athletes from the Valley are competing for Los Angeles in the Maccabi Youth Games in Newark, N.J. The following are highlights from action Monday: BASEBALL Adam Petrocelli of Crespi High had three hits and Buzz Buyer of Royal added two in a 13-2 victory over Baltimore in a 13-14 age-group game. Spencer Gordon of Chaminade was the winning pitcher. Adam Siegel of Harvard-Westlake knocked in six runs in a 17-6 rout of Toronto in a 15-16 game.
BOOKS
September 10, 2006
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction 1 The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards (Penguin: $14) A father hides the birth of a twin from his wife. 2 The Sea by John Banville (Vintage: $12.95) A recent widower visits the coastal town where he spent time as a boy. 3 The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho (HarperSanFrancisco: $13) An Andalusian shepherd boy searches for treasure in Egypt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Malibu floods. Malibu mops up. Malibu dries out. A Sunday respite complete with enamel-blue skies, cottony clouds and balmy weather provided the quintessential beachy backdrop to the ritual cleanup after rains and floods created the worst disaster in Malibu since the 1993 wildfires. About 100 houses had been socked in by mud piled up in driveways and garages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER and JOHN L. MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An intense winter downpour-- the third major storm to hit the region in two weeks--brought heavy snowfalls to local mountains and left Malibu residents once again digging out of mud and debris that surged down rain-soaked hillsides. The powerful cloudbursts Sunday trapped some beachfront residents in their homes and cars, forced a brief closing of Interstate 5 at the Grapevine and set loose mudslides that shut down a portion of Pacific Coast Highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER and JOHN L. MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An intense winter downpour--the third major storm to hit the region in two weeks--brought heavy snowfalls to local mountains and left Malibu residents once again digging out of mud and debris that surged down rain-soaked hillsides. The powerful cloudbursts Sunday trapped some beachfront residents in their homes and cars, forced a brief closing of Interstate 5 at the Grapevine and set loose mudslides that shut down a portion of Pacific Coast Highway.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Malibu, some were shoveling out. Others were shoving off. "I'm staying. It's really beautiful here," Sharon Sandler said as she tugged at a garden rake to clean the mud from her beachfront living room. "I'm leaving. This place is a mess. This area's unsafe," Carol Stoinski said as she lugged a trash bag filled with her clothes through the thick ooze that poured through her front door.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
Children's comic-book veterans Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon -- age 76 and 75, respectively -- seem a most unlikely duo to make it big in the graphic-book medium, a field dominated by manga, superheroes and the avant-garde. After toiling in near anonymity for more than 50 years, the longtime friends have burst into the media spotlight with their recently published graphic adaptation of "The 9/11 Commission Report." Released to coincide with the fifth anniversary of Sept.
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