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BUSINESS
August 1, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sid Richardson Bass is neither a director nor an executive of Walt Disney Co. But when Disney makes a decision as monumental as its planned $19-billion purchase of Capital Cities/ABC Inc., Sid Bass' advice counts for plenty. Just ask Disney Chairman Michael D. Eisner, who told a press conference Monday that he's long leaned on Bass' opinion--and never more so than in the Cap Cities deal. Bass, 53, is one of four tycoon brothers from Ft. Worth, Tex.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1987
The group, led by Sid R. Bass of Fort Worth, Tex., lowered its stake to 16.8%, with Sid Bass continuing to own 4%. Sales by his younger brother Robert and the Robert M. Bass Group accounted for most of the transactions. Documents filed at the SEC indicated that Robert Bass has sold and gave away to charitable institutions, all of his Disney shares, except 75,144 shares in two custodial accounts. The filing noted that Robert Bass and his group have recouped their entire Disney investment.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
RTC to Sell Big Mortgage Banking Firm: The Resolution Trust Corp. is about to sell the largest mortgage banking company under its control to an investor group backed in part by Texas billionaires Sid and Lee Bass. The San Antonio-based company, BancPlus Mortgage Corp., is to be bought for more than $100 million by a group led by Herbert Carrel, its chief executive, according to industry sources. The sale will reduce the government's mortgage servicing portfolio by almost 10%, to $84 billion.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
RTC to Sell Big Mortgage Banking Firm: The Resolution Trust Corp. is about to sell the largest mortgage banking company under its control to an investor group backed in part by Texas billionaires Sid and Lee Bass. The San Antonio-based company, BancPlus Mortgage Corp., is to be bought for more than $100 million by a group led by Herbert Carrel, its chief executive, according to industry sources. The sale will reduce the government's mortgage servicing portfolio by almost 10%, to $84 billion.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sid Richardson Bass is neither a director nor an executive of Walt Disney Co. But when Disney makes a decision as monumental as its planned $19-billion purchase of Capital Cities/ABC Inc., Sid Bass' advice counts for plenty. Just ask Disney Chairman Michael D. Eisner, who told a press conference Monday that he's long leaned on Bass' opinion--and never more so than in the Cap Cities deal. Bass, 53, is one of four tycoon brothers from Ft. Worth, Tex.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Walt Disney Co. stock rose sharply Wednesday amid speculation that the entertainment kingdom might be the next takeover target of Paramount Communications Inc. Burbank-based Disney would not comment other than to say it had no information to explain the rise. The stock, up more than $7 at one point from Tuesday's close, finished up $5.375 at $109.75 a share in New York Stock Exchange trading. A group led by Sid Bass, one of the Ft.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1996 | KATIE FAIRBANK, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
When La Quinta opened its doors to overnight guests attending the 1968 HemisFair in San Antonio, the motel's name was unique. Exotic even. But it soon became the subject of a joke told and retold countless times over the years: What does La Quinta mean? Next to Denny's. President and CEO Gary Mead listens to the quip with a strained smile. He's heard it before.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The typical public reaction to last week's news of Michael Eisner's $197-million payout from stock options was negative. "It's obscene. Nobody's worth that kind of money," said an attorney when told the income of Walt Disney Co.'s chairman. Even top business executives were qualified in their responses. "A deal's a deal," said one corporate chieftain, citing the fact that Eisner's now-valuable options date to 1984, when he took the helm at Disney.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | KATHRYN HARRIS and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Walt Disney Co. shocked Hollywood and Wall Street on Wednesday by announcing that veteran studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg will leave the company next month after losing a highly publicized campaign to be named second in command to Chairman Michael D. Eisner.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Walt Disney Co. stock rose sharply Wednesday amid speculation that the entertainment kingdom might be the next takeover target of Paramount Communications Inc. Burbank-based Disney would not comment other than to say it had no information to explain the rise. The stock, up more than $7 at one point from Tuesday's close, finished up $5.375 at $109.75 a share in New York Stock Exchange trading. A group led by Sid Bass, one of the Ft.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1987
The group, led by Sid R. Bass of Fort Worth, Tex., lowered its stake to 16.8%, with Sid Bass continuing to own 4%. Sales by his younger brother Robert and the Robert M. Bass Group accounted for most of the transactions. Documents filed at the SEC indicated that Robert Bass has sold and gave away to charitable institutions, all of his Disney shares, except 75,144 shares in two custodial accounts. The filing noted that Robert Bass and his group have recouped their entire Disney investment.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2007 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
For once, the crowds that gathered Monday outside the White House were not carrying antiwar placards or shouting angry slogans. Instead, on a sunny spring day that contrasted with the dark mood of partisan discord that normally clouds Washington, they cheered loudly for President Bush and for the regal woman by his side, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 1995 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Kathryn Harris, a staff writer for The Times, covers Hollywood for the business section
On an afternoon in January, Walt Disney Chairman Michael D. Eisner sat midway down the aisle in a darkened theater on the Burbank studio lot, watching a five-hour spectacle unfold. This was no "Pocahontas" screening, although the animated feature is being readied for summer. Nor was Eisner previewing the live-action thriller "Crimson Tide," due from the Don Simpson-Jerry Bruckheimer team that delivered the bulk of Paramount Pictures' blockbusters in the 1980s. Instead, a live performance was under way, with top Disney executives addressing 130 analysts who had traveled from brokerage firms and banks to gauge the strength of Disney management after a disaster-filled year.
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