Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSiddiq Barmak
IN THE NEWS

Siddiq Barmak

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
The fictional Afghan film "Osama" takes place before U.S. bombs began falling on Kabul, when the Taliban was ravaging the country and its people under the cover of the world's indifference. The film is a view from the abyss that recounts the twined story of a girl forced into male disguise and bestowed the terrible name of Osama, and that of Afghani women whose right to exist was all but denied in the name of God. Raw and wretchedly current, it is a story that packs a cruel emotional wallop.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
The making of every film is an uphill journey, and the beginning of this one seemed more hopeless than most, conceived as it was while the director was in exile in Pakistan. Afghan director Siddiq Barmak wanted to tell a story about what life was really like in his country under the rule of the Taliban, life with all its daily precautions and terror. But would he ever be able to return to do so? Then the U.S. invaded Afghanistan and the Taliban fell.
Advertisement
WORLD
June 2, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It towered, a fantastical construction of orange-scented cake and butter cream icing created by a team of four men, including an engineer: a 132-pound dessert in the shape of a ship, dedicated to Afghanistan's favorite film, "Titanic." Although the Taliban had banned films and shut down cinemas when the movie was released in 1997, most people here in the capital watched pirated copies at home on their illegal VCRs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
The fictional Afghan film "Osama" takes place before U.S. bombs began falling on Kabul, when the Taliban was ravaging the country and its people under the cover of the world's indifference. The film is a view from the abyss that recounts the twined story of a girl forced into male disguise and bestowed the terrible name of Osama, and that of Afghani women whose right to exist was all but denied in the name of God. Raw and wretchedly current, it is a story that packs a cruel emotional wallop.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
The making of every film is an uphill journey, and the beginning of this one seemed more hopeless than most, conceived as it was while the director was in exile in Pakistan. Afghan director Siddiq Barmak wanted to tell a story about what life was really like in his country under the rule of the Taliban, life with all its daily precautions and terror. But would he ever be able to return to do so? Then the U.S. invaded Afghanistan and the Taliban fell.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004
It's refreshing to read about Siddiq Barmak's decision to make a film to "show the dark side" of life under the Taliban ("Victory After Exile," by Scarlet Cheng, Feb. 8). I have grown tired of the constant depiction in the media of the happy, peppy, fun-loving side. Paul Chase Torrance
OPINION
January 6, 2005 | MAX BOOT, Max Boot is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
During World War II, Frank Capra made a series of films called "Why We Fight" to rally Americans behind the war effort. Imagine a filmmaker doing that today. Actually, it's impossible to imagine.
NEWS
November 6, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Among the films available for preview in AFI Fest 2003 was a group so diverse and impressive that it augurs well for the 17th edition of the festival, which runs today through Nov. 16 at the ArcLight. Dagur Kari's "Noi Albinoi" is a stunningly simple yet completely original coming-of-age story set in a community of fewer than 1,000 people on an Icelandic fjord.
WORLD
May 24, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdul Hamid Ghaznawee dreamed of becoming Afghanistan's "Arnold"--a new action star like Schwarzenegger. As long as the Taliban was in power, he kept this ambition secret, like the videos he watched at home. But as soon as the radical Islamic regime was toppled and its ban on film and television lifted, the 17-year-old showed up at the studios of Afghan Film, looking for a movie role. His act of naive optimism paid off.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2005 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
At this point in the presidency of George W. Bush, you might think you know just about everything worth knowing about him: his love of liberty, his rejection of the Eastern elitism that is his birthright, his irresponsible youth, his profound religious conviction, his tendency to see the world in black and white. But there are certain colorful aspects of the president's life that have not been much explored, understandably overshadowed by war and a hard-fought election.
WORLD
June 2, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It towered, a fantastical construction of orange-scented cake and butter cream icing created by a team of four men, including an engineer: a 132-pound dessert in the shape of a ship, dedicated to Afghanistan's favorite film, "Titanic." Although the Taliban had banned films and shut down cinemas when the movie was released in 1997, most people here in the capital watched pirated copies at home on their illegal VCRs.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|