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Side Man Play

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January 31, 1999 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
On July 26, 1997, writer Warren Leight was waiting to make a left-hand turn on a two-lane road in the Hamptons when he looked into his rearview mirror. What he saw was an 18-wheeler traveling at 50 mph about to plow into the rear end of his car. In the nanosecond before impact, he thought, "I'm either about to die or to be in a major accident. Now maybe they'll produce my play."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1999 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
On July 26, 1997, writer Warren Leight was waiting to make a left-hand turn on a two-lane road in the Hamptons when he looked into his rearview mirror. What he saw was an 18-wheeler traveling at 50 mph about to plow into the rear end of his car. In the nanosecond before impact, he thought, "I'm either about to die or to be in a major accident. Now maybe they'll produce my play."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donald Leight, 80, a trumpet player whose life as one of the relatively anonymous players working in big bands in New York City was the inspiration for "Side Man," a play written by his son Warren, died Jan. 3 at a hospital in New York City, Associated Press reported. The cause of death was pneumonia and complications from Parkinson's disease. Warren Leight's largely autobiographical play told of growing up with his remote musician father, who neglected his family in the pursuit of his music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
In the days just before the Ovation Awards ceremony last Monday, the show's executive producer, Farrell Hirsch, was in a dither about who would be the emcee. The previously announced Jason Alexander had backed out. Hirsch asked Martin Short, but the taping of Short's TV show wouldn't allow him to get to La Mirada Theatre, site of this year's Ovations, in time. Other names came and went. Finally, the event proceeded without an emcee.
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