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TRAVEL
September 28, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
I planned on about 250 miles of driving around the northern towns near Porto, three days and two nights. If I had it to do again, though, I'd give myself another night, and perhaps stray a bit farther inland to the wine-country town of Lamego. But I still managed to see plenty of four northern towns. Not much English is spoken in any of them, but that doesn't mean a traveler will be ignored.
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TRAVEL
October 30, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
JUNE LAKE, Calif. - Love turning conventional wisdom on its ear, don't you? Here's my little ode to the Eastern Sierra's amazing fall palette, an improbable leaf-peeping site devoted to it, and its Web master, who claims that the Golden State has the longest and best autumn in the nation. I now agree. To all you Eastern transplants who pine for the fall colors of your childhood, fly up U.S. 395 with me in my rental Ford, past the cottonwoods and aspen groves that light the hillsides like glowing campfires.
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NEWS
March 1, 1994
Worst Driver It was reported that within a 20-minute span, a 75-year-old male driver in McKinney, Tex., received 10 traffic tickets, drove on the wrong side of the road four times, committed four hit-and-run offenses and caused six accidents on Oct. 15, 1966. Worst Exit to Miss The longest distance between controlled access exits in the United States is 51.1 miles from Florida Turnpike exit 193 (Yeehaw Junction) to exit 244 (Kissimee). The worst exit to miss on an interstate highway is 37.
TRAVEL
March 13, 2011 | By Don Shirley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Travel due east across the Atlantic from New York, and the first country you'll encounter is Portugal. But it's often an afterthought for most Americans — a side trip if there's spare time after visiting Spain, its bigger neighbor. With its stumbling economy, Portugal has garnered more attention than usual, This is bad news for the Portuguese, of course, but savvy travelers know that bad economies often mean great deals. Late last spring, my wife and I spent nine nights — but relatively few euros — in Portugal, staying at a variety of distinctive lodgings for a fraction of what comparable accommodations would cost in the U.S. or in much of Europe.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 2002 | RENEE VOGEL
Part of the price of being a tourist is often hauling around bulky guidebooks and trying to decipher unwieldy street maps. Now the innovative InsideOut City Guides give travelers a sense of direction without the hassle.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 1993 | Kathleen Doheny
Keeping up your regular exercise routine can be difficult while traveling, but it's easier if you know where the natives sweat when you reach your destination. Here are some recommended hot spots for jogging and other exercise in four far-flung capitals, according to resident experts. * Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1994 | DANIELLE FOUQUETTE
Students attending competitions, conventions and other extended field trips might no longer be allowed to take side trips to visit amusement parks. Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District officials began a review of the district's policy on extended field trips at the request of school board President Judy Miner. The issue of side trips to nearby amusement parks on weekend field trips came up at Tuesday's board meeting during discussion of two planned Esperanza High School field trips.
MAGAZINE
April 9, 2000
It was great to see the article in the travel issue on the annual opening of the extraordinary Royal Greenhouses in Brussels, Belgium, and their amazingly beautiful floral displays ("Greenhouse Effect," by Dale M. Brown, Side Trips, March 19). However, the greenhouses were not constructed in the 17th century, as the article says, but in the late 19th century. Richard Harris Pasadena
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | Emmett Berg
Veteran hiker and mountaineer Paul Richins Jr. draws upon his 35 years in California's wild spaces to craft a well-appended guide to 20 multi-day hikes, most 40 to 60 milers. As the "trekking" handle indicates, the book focuses on longer, more adventurous trips. Several routes blaze trail-free or seldom-trodden terrain. Each trek is illustrated with a glossy map and includes elevation relief, total distance and camp logistics. Richins also suggests side trips and jaunts up peaks.
TRAVEL
March 26, 1989 | BILL HUGHES, Hughes is a 30-year veteran travel writer living in Sherman Oaks
Stay-Put Tours, a mature travel vacation concept started by Bob Costa of Corliss Tours two years ago, has grown to 11 destinations and 44 departures this year. Costa has added weeklong stays in Charleston, S.C.; San Antonio, Tex., and Vancouver, Canada, to his already popular trips to Orlando, Fla., Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Montreal, Toronto and Washington, D.C.
TRAVEL
May 30, 2010 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A frizzy-haired old woman wearing sandals used to sit on a stoop at the Palais-Royal in Paris. If people took her for a tramp, what did she care? Her extraordinary life was almost over. Now she could spend her afternoons eyeing passersby and cooing at stray cats. Her ghost still haunts the quiet northern arcade of the Palais-Royal. Only now there's a plaque to identify her: Colette, the extraordinary French writer who spent her last years at the edge of this garden. It doesn't list dates; vain to the last, she wouldn't have liked that.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Imagine THE smell of barbecue and methamphetamine under the Texas summer sun. This year, the Ozzfest festival -- an all-day celebration of brawny and sinister heavy metal music -- took its amplifiers to the Lone Star State, and tens of thousands of fans came from across the South and beyond to lose themselves in guitar-solo alchemy and skull-and-bone lyrics. Backstage and a million miles away from the mosh, the four members of Metallica, the night's headline act, seemed to be surrounded by a bubble of calm.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
SECRET SPOTS OF THE WEST We asked you to nominate your favorite vacation places in the West -- your travel touchstones, so to speak -- and you came back with a satchel full of suggestions. We sifted and sorted and chose six to explore for ourselves. Marvelous or mundane? You be the judge. -- "It's so peaceful there. It's just such a beautiful place to go," says Michele Johnson of Los Angeles, in nominating the Best Friends Animal Society's sanctuary in Utah. THE SETTING Angel Canyon, a postcard-perfect, rust-colored sandstone canyon outside of Kanab, Utah, is home to the Best Friends animal sanctuary, said to be the country's largest no-kill animal shelter.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | Christopher Reynolds, Times staff writer
SECRET SPOTS OF THE WEST We asked you to nominate your favorite vacation places in the West -- your travel touchstones, so to speak -- and you came back with a satchel full of suggestions. We sifted and sorted and chose six to explore for ourselves. Marvelous or mundane? You be the judge. -- "The most interesting part about [El Morro] is the signatures of all the people going through there," says reader Laura LaCour-Johnson, a native of Albuquerque. "The best time to go is just before winter, when it's chilly but you can still go up. If it has just snowed, it's really, really nice."
NATIONAL
November 1, 2007 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
Presidential candidates have flip-flopped on taxes, abortion, gun control and the war. But rarely has one flip-flopped on flying saucers. Until now. In September, a spokeswoman for Dennis J. Kucinich dismissed a report emanating from a Washington conference about UFOs that the Ohio congressman had a close encounter with one. "If you have a serious question, just ask me," Kucinich staffer Natalie Laber instructed a Washington Post reporter who inquired about Kucinich's knowledge of UFOs.
MAGAZINE
October 16, 2005 | ROBIN RAUZI
As American hoteliers try to imbue their spaces with personality, they aren't stopping at the threshold: The do-not-disturb sign has taken a turn for the kicky. Take New York's Le Parker Meridien, which orders its "FUHGETTABOUDIT" doorknob tags in bulk these days because they keep winding up in suitcases. The first witty door hanger that Armella Stepan remembers was at the 1995 opening of the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas. It read: "I hear you knockin', but you can't come in," a lyric from 1950s R&B singer Smiley Lewis.
TRAVEL
April 30, 1989
Gena Reisner's story, "Scotland By Train" (April 2), was most interesting, especially (in mentioning) the Royal Scotsman. In celebration of our 50th wedding anniversary, my wife and I took the six-day tour. Words cannot describe the luxury of this train. We had a stateroom, including all private facilities. The dining car was used by Earl Haig in World War I. The train includes carriages from the late Victorian and Edwardian periods and is limited to 28 people. And side trips to such things as historic sites and castles not open to the public are arranged.
TRAVEL
April 11, 1993 | BETTY MARTIN
A NEW ENGLAND SAMPLER (Thomas Travelogs, 80 minutes, 1992). This video gives viewers a tour of major attractions in the six New England states. The film quality and narration are superb. Beginning in Massachusetts, viewers follow the course of early American history--from the Pilgrims' landings at Provincetown and Plymouth to the American Revolution. A visit to Rhode Island includes the story of Roger Williams, his quest for religious freedom and the founding of the town of Providence.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2005 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
How many musicians would cite a picnic as one of the most cherished memories of their professional life? That's what you get with the Knitters. Life in the group -- a sporadic ensemble of X members Exene Cervenka, John Doe and D.J. Bonebrake and former Blasters guitarist Dave Alvin and roots-rock bassist Jonny Ray Bartel -- is just a different pace than the norm. "We were playing down toward San Diego and Dave said, 'There's a mission here, have you seen it?'
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | Emmett Berg
Veteran hiker and mountaineer Paul Richins Jr. draws upon his 35 years in California's wild spaces to craft a well-appended guide to 20 multi-day hikes, most 40 to 60 milers. As the "trekking" handle indicates, the book focuses on longer, more adventurous trips. Several routes blaze trail-free or seldom-trodden terrain. Each trek is illustrated with a glossy map and includes elevation relief, total distance and camp logistics. Richins also suggests side trips and jaunts up peaks.
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