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Sideout Sport Company

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BUSINESS
November 28, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a trademark infringement dispute, Pasadena sportswear maker Sideout Sport won a federal court order Wednesday temporarily barring apparel giant Nike Inc. from selling or advertising its Side 1 line of women's footwear and accessories. The ruling will apparently sideline Side 1 for the Christmas retailing season, a heavy blow to the line, which Nike said has annual sales of about $6 million.
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BUSINESS
February 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Nike Inc.'s Side 1 women's sports apparel division announced Friday that it had settled a $10-million trademark infringement lawsuit brought by sportswear maker Sideout Sport. The settlement with the smaller, Pasadena-based Sideout Sport ended a two-month court-imposed ban on the sale of Side 1 products. Under terms of the agreement, Side 1 will use a redesigned logo that looks less like the Sideout Sport trademark, the two companies said in a joint news statement.
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BUSINESS
February 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Nike Inc.'s Side 1 women's sports apparel division announced Friday that it had settled a $10-million trademark infringement lawsuit brought by sportswear maker Sideout Sport. The settlement with the smaller, Pasadena-based Sideout Sport ended a two-month court-imposed ban on the sale of Side 1 products. Under terms of the agreement, Side 1 will use a redesigned logo that looks less like the Sideout Sport trademark, the two companies said in a joint news statement.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1992
Nike Wins Round in Court: A federal judge has ruled that Nike Inc. did not violate a preliminary injunction when its Side 1 fitness shoes appeared in the movie "Father of the Bride." The judge ruled last week that the company's Side 1 logo, the object of a $10-million trademark infringement lawsuit, did not appear in the movie starring Steve Martin and thus did not violate the preliminary injunction won last year by a Pasadena sportswear company. Nike, based in Beaverton, Ore.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1992
Nike Wins Round in Court: A federal judge has ruled that Nike Inc. did not violate a preliminary injunction when its Side 1 fitness shoes appeared in the movie "Father of the Bride." The judge ruled last week that the company's Side 1 logo, the object of a $10-million trademark infringement lawsuit, did not appear in the movie starring Steve Martin and thus did not violate the preliminary injunction won last year by a Pasadena sportswear company. Nike, based in Beaverton, Ore.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sideout Sport Sues Nike: The small Pasadena-based sportswear firm said it filed a trademark infringement suit against the nation's No. 1 sneaker marketer. The suit, filed in federal court in Los Angeles, seeks $10 million in damages and accuses Nike of infringing on Sideout's name and logo with its Side 1 sneakers and footwear. A Nike spokeswoman declined to comment directly on the suit, saying that her company has not seen it.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nike Inc. is withdrawing up to $5 million in shoes and clothing from the marketplace after a federal judge found that the Oregon apparel giant deliberately infringed on a small Pasadena firm's name and trademark. Last month, Judge David V. Kenyon of U.S.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Father of the Bride," Steve Martin plays an entrepreneur who owns an athletic shoe company called "Side Kick." Maybe he should have been a grocer. The new comedy has become grist for an ongoing trademark infringement dispute between beach volleyball outfitter Sideout Sport and footwear giant Nike Inc. Pasadena-based Sideout won a court order Dec.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Father of the Bride," Steve Martin plays an entrepreneur who owns an athletic shoe company called "Side Kick." Maybe he should have been a grocer. The new comedy has become grist for an ongoing trademark infringement dispute between beach volleyball outfitter Sideout Sport and footwear giant Nike Inc. Pasadena-based Sideout won a court order Dec.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nike Inc. is withdrawing up to $5 million in shoes and clothing from the marketplace after a federal judge found that the Oregon apparel giant deliberately infringed on a small Pasadena firm's name and trademark. Last month, Judge David V. Kenyon of U.S.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a trademark infringement dispute, Pasadena sportswear maker Sideout Sport won a federal court order Wednesday temporarily barring apparel giant Nike Inc. from selling or advertising its Side 1 line of women's footwear and accessories. The ruling will apparently sideline Side 1 for the Christmas retailing season, a heavy blow to the line, which Nike said has annual sales of about $6 million.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sideout Sport Sues Nike: The small Pasadena-based sportswear firm said it filed a trademark infringement suit against the nation's No. 1 sneaker marketer. The suit, filed in federal court in Los Angeles, seeks $10 million in damages and accuses Nike of infringing on Sideout's name and logo with its Side 1 sneakers and footwear. A Nike spokeswoman declined to comment directly on the suit, saying that her company has not seen it.
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