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Sidewalks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
East Newhall will receive a $650,000 make-over later this year in the form of new sidewalks and repaved alleyways. The work is expected to improve drainage conditions and pedestrian safety. Residents have long asked for sidewalks in the area. A candidate for City Council in April made the sidewalks an issue. Larry Bird said that funds have been long been available to the city for infrastructure improvements. "They have been getting grant funds for years," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | Steve Lopez
I learned two things when Deborah Murphy of Silver Lake sent me an email in mid-December. First, there's a pedestrian-advocacy organization in our car-crazed metropolis, and it goes by the name of Los Angeles Walks. Second, there's a city of L.A. Pedestrian Advocacy Committee. Murphy is executive director of the former, chair of the latter, and she wanted to know if I could meet with her to discuss a development she's not happy about. Namely, there's the possibility of a $3-billion street repair bond measure on the November ballot this year, but as currently conceived, it would fix only the worst of L.A.'s streets and do nothing for the city's abominable sidewalks.
OPINION
September 11, 2012
Broken sidewalks may not be quite as dangerous as rutted streets, but they too can be treacherous. An estimated 42% of the 10,750 miles of sidewalks in the city of Los Angeles are crumbling or buckling, lifted by tree roots in some places to scarily high inclines. The city gets about 2,500 "trip and fall" claims each year, and wheelchair users have sued the city, contending that the sidewalks are an obstacle course that violates the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. That they need to be fixed is a no-brainer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014
Join Times columnist Steve Lopez for an L.A. Now Live chat Monday at 12:30 p.m. about the state of sidewalks and streets in Los Angeles. He will also be taking reader questions on a variety of issues. Lopez has written recently about the sorry state of many of the sidewalks in the city and the several millions of dollars paid out annually to those who have filed claims against L.A. after tripping and injuring themselves. It's what Lopez calls a pedestrian vs. pavement problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | By William Nottingham
During separate video interviews with the Los Angeles Times last month, candidates for L.A. mayor Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel responded to questions from individual voters. Among them is Alissa Walker of Silver Lake, who asked: What do the candidates plan to do about L.A.'s crumbling sidewalks? Walker, a pedestrian advocate, adds that L.A.'s streets are too wide, and "there are far too many" pedestrian collisions on city streets. Here's the video of what Garcetti had to say to Walker.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
The blizzard that has shut down the East Coast calls for some warnings about playing in or even walking on  snow and ice. The American Assn. of Orthopedic Surgeons (and really, those docs should know) has some advice to share with the hundreds of thousands of Americans who will get injured this year. An association report on winter sports found snowboarding the No. 1 injury sport (164,002) and sledding, snow tubing and tobogganing a close second (160,020) in 2007. Here are some safety tips from the Health Notes blog of the Newport News Daily Press and practical advice on avoiding snow sport injuries from the AAOS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Three Los Angeles City Council members voiced alarm Wednesday that a proposed study of broken sidewalks could take three years, saying they want a faster and cheaper plan for getting their arms around the problem. Councilmen Eric Garcetti, Bill Rosendahl and Joe Buscaino called for the Bureau of Street Services to "go back to the drawing board" on a proposed field survey of an estimated $1.5 billion in damaged sidewalks. They said they want a less costly approach than the proposed survey, which officials have predicted would cost "well over $10 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2012 | Steve Lopez
The people of Los Angeles, home to hundreds of thousands of unmaintained city-owned trees and roughly 5,000 miles of bad sidewalk, have spoken. And they're not happy. The most frustrating tale I heard was from a Woodland Hills couple who took matters into their own hands, only to find no end to the punishment for their good deed. But first, a review of the flood of response to my Sunday column, which featured city residents who'd rather volunteer to do their own survey of crumbling sidewalks than have the city go with a proposal to spend $10 million in taxpayer money on a three-year study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles may be the land of the freeway, but it is notorious for its bad sidewalks — buckled, cracked and sometimes impassable. By the city's own estimate, 42% of its 10,750 miles of pedestrian paths are in disrepair. Now a series of civil-rights lawsuits against Los Angeles and other California cities is for the first time focusing attention — and money — on a problem that decades of complaining, heated public hearings and letter-writing campaigns could not. The lawsuits were filed by disabled people who say broken sidewalks make it impossible for them to get around and seek repairs or improvements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
Because the city cannot afford to do all of the sidewalk work that is needed at one time, the City Council this week prioritized 717 blocks that need it most. Building the sidewalks in all the areas that need the work would cost $17.2 million, the city says. And that figure doesn't include relocating utilities and acquiring right-of-ways from property owners. The action on Monday followed a review of a study on missing sidewalks the council commissioned in February.
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