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Sidney Altman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1998
Re "Girlfriend Sues as Samantha the Dog Inherits Man's Millions," Sept. 23: After reading about Samantha, the cocker spaniel, and Marie Dana, it's obvious to me that Sidney Altman was well aware of who his true friends were. Tell Dana to take the $60,000 and get an education in order to find a good-paying job and become a contributing member of society. CARROLL BROWN Sierra Madre
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1998
Re "Girlfriend Sues as Samantha the Dog Inherits Man's Millions," Sept. 23: After reading about Samantha, the cocker spaniel, and Marie Dana, it's obvious to me that Sidney Altman was well aware of who his true friends were. Tell Dana to take the $60,000 and get an education in order to find a good-paying job and become a contributing member of society. CARROLL BROWN Sierra Madre
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NEWS
October 13, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two American molecular biologists who revolutionized scientists' view of the nature of the first life on Earth won the Nobel Prize for chemistry on Thursday, while two Americans and a German physicist who developed new techniques for highly accurate timekeeping shared the physics Nobel.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two American molecular biologists who revolutionized scientists' view of the nature of the first life on Earth won the Nobel Prize for chemistry on Thursday, while two Americans and a German physicist who developed new techniques for highly accurate timekeeping shared the physics Nobel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998
A woman whose late companion left most of his $5-million estate to his beloved cocker spaniel will get to tell a mediator why she is entitled to a larger share of the money. Marie Dana, 32, is suing for half of the estate--an amount still being determined, said her attorney, Cary Goldstein. He has previously said she was asking for $2.7 million.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Dalai Lama accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on Sunday and said that despite Chinese rebuffs, he remains committed to nonviolence in seeking an end to China's 40-year occupation of his Himalayan homeland, Tibet. "I accept the prize with profound gratitude on behalf of the oppressed everywhere and for all those who struggle for freedom and work for world peace," he said at a ceremony attended by King Olav V and government officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998 | AL MARTINEZ
If there were three things Sidney Altman loved more than anything, it was his bathroom, his dog and his woman. Apparently in that order. This has caused something of a problem. Altman made millions selling bathroom fixtures in West Hollywood until his death two years ago, which explains his first love. His second love was Samantha, a cocker spaniel, and his third love was his blond girlfriend, Marie Dana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sidney Altman's best friend wasn't his blond girlfriend, Marie Dana. According to his will, it was his blond cocker spaniel, Samantha, and he left the dog the bulk of his $6-million estate. Dana is contesting the will in Los Angeles Superior Court. She is seeking a $2.7-million bite of the estate in an unusual lawsuit that combines the elements of a palimony case with those of a probate dispute.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
Researchers have found a way to turn off the genes that make bacteria resistant to antibiotic drugs, a discovery that could help head off a major medical crisis in the treatment of infections. Bacteria have been growing increasingly resistant to antibiotics. Many infections no longer respond well to drugs that once worked against them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1990 | PAUL RAEBURN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Researchers have made the startling discovery that some chemical messages sent by genes are changed before they arrive at their destinations, a finding that challenges a central tenet of genetics. "It's an absolutely astounding concept," said Olke Uhlenbeck of the University of Colorado in Boulder, a biochemist familiar with the research. "Nobody has the foggiest idea how it works." The phenomenon is called RNA editing.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
An innovative "molecular scissors" that interferes with the infection of cells by the AIDS virus has been developed by researchers at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte. Molecular geneticist John J. Rossi and his colleagues report today in the journal Science that they have used a specially prepared form of RNA (ribonucleic acid) to create the scissors, which snips apart the virus' own RNA before it can be used as a blueprint for replication of the virus.
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