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Sidney B Felsen

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1999
Bruce and Norman Yonemoto Video artists, 49 and 52 What they've done: Since the early 1980s, the well-known L.A.-based brothers have produced single-channel videotapes and monumental video installations that are poetic ruminations on the myriad ways in which the electronic revolution is creating the strange worlds in which we live today. Their post-Pop narratives chart new and unexpected identities, in which borders dissolve and the past is rarely what it seems.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1999 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than 30 years, Sidney B. Felsen has photographed the world-renowned artists who have worked with Gemini G.E.L., the innovative Melrose Avenue print workshop and limited-edition publishing enterprise he founded in 1966 with partners Stanley Grinstein and master printer Kenneth Tyler. Culled from several decades' worth of Felsen's work, "Artist's Proof: Photographs by Sidney B.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1997 | SIDNEY B. FELSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During their 30-year working friendship, Sidney B. Felsen, a co-founder of Gemini G.E.L. printmaking studio, helped Roy Lichtenstein produce some of his most famous and influential graphic work. The artist, who died Monday of pneumonia at 73, is remembered here. My friendship with Roy Lichtenstein began in 1968, when he came to Gemini to create his historic series of "Haystacks" and "Cathedrals" based on Monet's Impressionist paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the Norton Simon Museum, an exhibition examining the L.A. area's postwar printmaking boom begins with a different sort of graphic. It's not a Richard Diebenkorn lithograph, an Ed Ruscha screenprint or any of the 150 or so other works in "Proof: The Rise of Printmaking in Southern California. " Gracing the title wall is a six-foot-wide bubble diagram - what "Proof" curator Leah Lehmbeck calls "a map of all the complexities, crossovers, key institutions and people covered in the show," which runs at the Pasadena museum through April 2. PHOTOS: Richard Diebenkorn The exhibition delves into an important chapter in American art history: the L.A.-based renaissance in the '60s and '70s, during which printmaking was embraced as a contemporary art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2006 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
To the world at large, Los Angeles jewelers are a few famous men who deluge the city's red carpets with big, important bling. Beyond the spotlights, however, a more quietly influential group is taking hold. They are L.A.'s indie jewelers, mostly young women who tend to describe themselves with a long strand of hyphenates: production assistant-stylist-jewelry designer, or photographer-artists' rep-jewelry designer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2006 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
DAVID HOCKNEY still recalls vividly the day, in his teens, when he first painted a portrait of his father. The older Hockney bought him the canvas, then set up a mirror to watch his son work. Although his father complained that "the colors were a bit dark," Hockney says, "that was the first painting I ever sold." Hockney, now 68, captured his father many times over the years in sketchbooks, oil and in a monumental double portrait with the artist's mother. On Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The Los Angeles area art gallery scene declared itself with unprecedented vigor when the fall season opened with a record number of new exhibitions--52 in one week. It's too soon to tell if the plunge in the stock market will knock the steam out of the local gallery boom, but Los Angeles dealers are sharply attuned to the market vibrations. "I don't foresee (a crash)," said Peter Goulds, who has weathered previous recessions during 12 years as owner of L.A. Louver Gallery in Venice.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000
Here's an update on last year's Faces to Watch. Movies Jason Schwartzman: He garnered numerous critical nods for his "Rushmore" performance as a theatrical prep school misfit who vied with Bill Murray for the affections of a teacher. He signed with United Talent Agency, which also represents the film's director, Wes Anderson, and co-star Owen Wilson. Anderson and Wilson are writing an untitled comedy for Disney with the "Rushmore" stars in mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2006 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
ELIZABETH MURRAY, subject of a Museum of Modern Art retrospective that closed in early January, was in her Tribeca studio making more paintings. But she had too many ideas. She didn't have the time to translate them all into paintings. Better to translate those ideas into prints, she decided. So she made dozens of drawings, chose a handful of favorites and stuffed them into her suitcase.
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