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Sidney Blumenthal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1999
Does journalist Christopher Hitchens realize why Linda Tripp has been so vilified in the news media and so despised by the public ("Prosecutors Push to Prolong Trial," Feb. 9)? How does his betrayal of former friend and White House aide Sidney Blumenthal differ from Tripp's betrayal of former friend and White House intern Monica Lewinsky? More importantly, it is hard to believe that journalistic principles seem to be less important to Hitchens than expressing his hatred of President Clinton.
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BOOKS
May 18, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times political writer in Washington, D.C.
When Al Gore ran for president in 2000, Bill Clinton was the invisible man. Gore seemed so spooked by Clinton's scandals that he ran away from his successes. But Clinton's name is springing more easily from the lips of the Democrats seeking his old job in 2004. Most of the leading Democratic presidential candidates are portraying their plans for the economy as a return to Clinton's agenda; even Rep. Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.
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NEWS
June 23, 1990
Dr. Sidney Blumenthal, 80, a former director of the National Institutes of Health. An educator and specialist in pediatric cardiology, Blumenthal was a professor and dean of continuing education at the University of Miami School of Medicine before he took the federal post as director of the heart and vascular disease division of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes. He had also taught at Columbia University and the University of Taiwan.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five independent counsels are probing various alleged misdeeds in the nation's capital at the moment, but most Americans would be hard pressed to name any except one: Kenneth W. Starr. Vilified by his critics as the embodiment of prosecutorial zealotry, Starr is blamed for almost single-handedly fueling the current movement to overhaul--or kill--the independent counsel statute that gave him his power.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over whether White House aide Sidney Blumenthal spread adverse comments about former intern Monica S. Lewinsky escalated Monday after House managers asked the Senate to prolong its impeachment trial so they could call new witnesses in the case. Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 23 grand jurors who heard independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's case against President Clinton had a lot to say about the key witnesses. They were skeptical but respectful of the president, threw their arms around Monica S. Lewinsky, empathized with Betty Currie, were cool toward Linda Tripp. And they found Sidney Blumenthal irritating.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he penned a lampoon of the Washington press corps several years ago, thoughts of scandal loomed large in the mind of author Sidney Blumenthal. To be precise, the thoughts were about how a corrupt and lazy news media conjure up a towering to-do that centers on a presidential pet. "In my play, the scandal's about the White House dog," Blumenthal told The Times in a 1995 interview. "I believe this scandal is more real than Whitewater."
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five independent counsels are probing various alleged misdeeds in the nation's capital at the moment, but most Americans would be hard pressed to name any except one: Kenneth W. Starr. Vilified by his critics as the embodiment of prosecutorial zealotry, Starr is blamed for almost single-handedly fueling the current movement to overhaul--or kill--the independent counsel statute that gave him his power.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
The ballroom at the Double Tree Guest Suites hotel in Santa Monica is abuzz with pre-play anticipation. This is the final night of a four-day run of Sidney Blumenthal's Washington press corps comedy "This Town," the opening entry in L.A. Theatre Works' Fall radio theater series. Onstage, a row of microphones stands, stage right, in front of a row of unremarkable orange hotel chairs.
NEWS
February 13, 1999
White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, say those who have talked with him recently, will not be surprised if the Justice Department now investigates him. At issue is whether he lied when he told House prosecutors and a federal grand jury that he was not the source for stories that Monica S. Lewinsky was "a stalker" whose advances President Clinton had rebuffed. Journalist Christopher Hitchens has filed an affidavit alleging that Blumenthal told him the story.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over whether White House aide Sidney Blumenthal spread adverse comments about former intern Monica S. Lewinsky escalated Monday after House managers asked the Senate to prolong its impeachment trial so they could call new witnesses in the case. Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her deposition for President Clinton's impeachment trial this week, Monica S. Lewinsky fenced deftly with prosecutors over key aspects of the case, referred them again and again to her earlier grand jury testimony and said that she thinks Clinton is "intelligent" and a good president. "I have mixed feelings" about Clinton now, Lewinsky said, according to a transcript of her four-hour deposition obtained by The Times.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 23 grand jurors who heard independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's case against President Clinton had a lot to say about the key witnesses. They were skeptical but respectful of the president, threw their arms around Monica S. Lewinsky, empathized with Betty Currie, were cool toward Linda Tripp. And they found Sidney Blumenthal irritating.
NEWS
May 28, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling made public on Wednesday, a federal judge said two senior White House officials must testify about conversations they had with President or First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton regarding the Monica S. Lewinsky controversy because the aides could possess "some of the most relevant and important evidence" showing whether the president committed a crime. Chief U.S.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1998 | Reuters
A federal judge this week dismissed a defamation suit brought against America Online Inc. for a story the Internet service carried. The suit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia by White House aide Sidney Blumenthal in late August, sought to hold Vienna, Va.-based AOL responsible for libel as the publisher of the story written by Internet columnist Matt Drudge that included allegations--later retracted--of spousal abuse.
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