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Sidney J Sheinberg

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BUSINESS
December 11, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The son of MCA President Sidney J. Sheinberg and three others agreed Thursday to pay $1.3 million to settle government insider-trading charges related to the 1990 acquisition of MCA by Japan's Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Jonathan J. Sheinberg, 34, an agent with the William Morris Agency, and three associates were charged in a civil complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday. They immediately settled without admitting guilt.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 1998
Anticipating a potential purchase of PolyGram Filmed Entertainment, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer owner Kirk Kerkorian recently approached former MCA Inc. President Sid Sheinberg about the possibility of coming aboard to help run the combined assets of MGM/PolyGram, according to sources familiar with the exploratory talks.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A key MCA board member and former Democratic National Committee chairman played an unusual dual role in talks that led to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.'s $6.59-billion acquisition of MCA Inc. Robert S. Strauss, a prominent Washington lawyer with Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, represented both sides on certain matters under a special agreement between the companies.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Marking the end of an era and the demise of Hollywood's longest reigning partnership, MCA Inc.'s two top executives officially vacated their posts Tuesday, with Sidney Jay Sheinberg disclosing plans for a production firm with his two sons and Lew Wasserman moving into an honorary chairman emeritus role. Both moves had been expected for several months. Wasserman, MCA's 82-year-old chairman and chief executive, will also join the board of directors of new MCA majority owner Seagram Co.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1986 | Wm. K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
MCA announced Tuesday that it intends to acquire all of the stock in three entertainment-related firms partly owned by MCA Records President Irving Azoff and to sign a new, long-term contract with the record executive. In acquiring the firms, MCA gets a talent management firm that handles such popular recording artists as Don Henley, Jimmy Buffett, Stevie Nicks and Heart; a small record label whose most successful artists are Dan Fogelberg and Chicago, and a merchandising firm.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER
What a way to take the onus off "Waterworld." Until a week ago, the executives at MCA Inc./Universal Pictures were preoccupied with the upcoming summer release of the mega-budgeted Kevin Costner futuristic movie. Now the collective mood has shifted to grave uncertainty about the future of the company and of the executives' own jobs. The impending sale of the venerable Hollywood entertainment giant to Seagram Co.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | ALAN CITRON and NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the Hollywood hierarchy, MCA Inc. Chairman Lew R. Wasserman has long exercised a rare kind of authority. He was the first "super-agent," a confidant of presidents, a political power broker and the man labor unions often sought out to resolve their most intractable disputes. On Monday, as the $6.59-billion sale of MCA to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. was marked with a champagne toast and a round of applause, the torch may have been passed.
NEWS
April 10, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Hollywood, deals are often made and broken based solely on trust. Sunday's sale of MCA Inc. by Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. stemmed from an intense distrust that had brewed for more than two years between the Japanese owners and American managers. Seagram Co.'s ability to move fast, tie up Matsushita in exclusive negotiations and gain control of MCA reflects the extraordinary trust that developed in just a few weeks between Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At MCA Inc.--the entertainment giant whose movies, records and theme parks help shape American popular culture--about 60 employees recently filed into a screening room for a talk on "group think," the history of sushi and the role of consensus-building in Japanese management. The wide-ranging discussion of Japanese business and culture ended with the MCA employees rising from their padded chairs and awkwardly bowing to one another.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
MCA Inc.'s board of directors Sunday night approved the key terms of a buyout offer from Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. An agreement to purchase the Hollywood studio for up to $6.85 billion is expected to be announced as early as today. Negotiations in the deal, which would be the largest purchase of an American company by a Japanese firm, remained cloaked in secrecy. But sources familiar with the talks said MCA's board approved a price acceptable to Matsushita's bargaining team.
NEWS
April 10, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Hollywood, deals are often made and broken based solely on trust. Sunday's sale of MCA Inc. by Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. stemmed from an intense distrust that had brewed for more than two years between the Japanese owners and American managers. Seagram Co.'s ability to move fast, tie up Matsushita in exclusive negotiations and gain control of MCA reflects the extraordinary trust that developed in just a few weeks between Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER
What a way to take the onus off "Waterworld." Until a week ago, the executives at MCA Inc./Universal Pictures were preoccupied with the upcoming summer release of the mega-budgeted Kevin Costner futuristic movie. Now the collective mood has shifted to grave uncertainty about the future of the company and of the executives' own jobs. The impending sale of the venerable Hollywood entertainment giant to Seagram Co.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The son of MCA President Sidney J. Sheinberg and three others agreed Thursday to pay $1.3 million to settle government insider-trading charges related to the 1990 acquisition of MCA by Japan's Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Jonathan J. Sheinberg, 34, an agent with the William Morris Agency, and three associates were charged in a civil complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday. They immediately settled without admitting guilt.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood Supports, the anti-homophobia and anti-AIDS discrimination organization created by prominent members of the entertainment industry, will be headed by an individual who has, at times, been among the industry's most outspoken critics. Richard Jennings was named the group's first executive director Thursday by organization founders Barry Diller, chairman and chief operating officer of Fox Inc.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At MCA Inc.--the entertainment giant whose movies, records and theme parks help shape American popular culture--about 60 employees recently filed into a screening room for a talk on "group think," the history of sushi and the role of consensus-building in Japanese management. The wide-ranging discussion of Japanese business and culture ended with the MCA employees rising from their padded chairs and awkwardly bowing to one another.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission is looking into possible insider trading in MCA stock before merger talks with Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. were revealed last year, but MCA President Sidney Sheinberg has denied any wrongdoing. The SEC is investigating stock trades by individuals who knew about the merger negotiations between MCA and Matsushita, which were revealed in September, 1990, the Washington Post reported.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly four months of secret negotiations, Hollywood's MCA Inc. on Monday signed an agreement to be bought by Japan's Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. for about $6.59 billion in cash and securities. MCA President Sidney J. Sheinberg said his company's need for a "strategic alliance," combined with pessimism about the economic future, led it to accept Matsushita's lower-than-expected offer of $66 per share in cash.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Lew R. Wasserman, the selling of MCA Inc. began with a phone call at home on the Labor Day weekend. The caller was Michael S. Ovitz, a 43-year-old talent agent with whom Wasserman had sometimes fought--but whom many in Hollywood found to be from Wasserman's own mold, aggressive, hard and wildly ambitious. Ovitz suggested that he might have a buyer for MCA, the $4-billion-a-year entertainment conglomerate at which Wasserman, 77, had spent 54 years. Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A key MCA board member and former Democratic National Committee chairman played an unusual dual role in talks that led to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.'s $6.59-billion acquisition of MCA Inc. Robert S. Strauss, a prominent Washington lawyer with Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, represented both sides on certain matters under a special agreement between the companies.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Lew R. Wasserman, the selling of MCA Inc. began with a phone call at home on the Labor Day weekend. The caller was Michael S. Ovitz, a 43-year-old talent agent with whom Wasserman had sometimes fought--but whom many in Hollywood found to be from Wasserman's own mold, aggressive, hard and wildly ambitious. Ovitz suggested that he might have a buyer for MCA, the $4-billion-a-year entertainment conglomerate at which Wasserman, 77, had spent 54 years. Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
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