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Sidney Lumet

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NEWS
December 16, 2004 | Lee Margulies
Director Sidney Lumet will be given an honorary Oscar at the Academy Awards next year in recognition of his "brilliant services to screenwriters, performers and the art of the motion picture," the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said Wednesday. Lumet, 80, has been nominated for a directing Oscar four times -- for "12 Angry Men," "Dog Day Afternoon," "Network" and "The Verdict" -- but has never won. Other film credits include "The Pawnbroker," "Serpico" and "Equus."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Somehow it has always felt right to me that Sidney Lumet's first film was 1957's "12 Angry Men," with all the elements that Lumet loved best. It was a dialogue-driven set piece by writer Reginald Rose that was perfect for a director who loved words. There was its powerful ensemble of actors, with Henry Fonda's lone dissenting juror facing off against Lee J. Cobb's rage. An unseen defendant's life hinged on a moral dilemma, with the jurors' debate an examination of social class and cultural perceptions as much as one man's guilt or innocence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2001 | MICHELE WILLENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sidney Lumet sits inside a cramped mini truck on Manhattan's Lower East Side. Wearing Levi's, a bulky sweater and headset, he is surrounded by two assistants who click buttons every time he snaps his fingers as a means of direction. They all keep a close eye on the "new new" tech monitors before them for a crucial scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2011 | Dennis McLellan
Sidney Lumet, the prolific four-time Oscar-nominated director known for guiding strong performances in classic films such as "12 Angry Men," "Dog Day Afternoon and "Network," died Saturday. He was 86. Lumet, whose film career spanned more than 50 years, died of lymphoma at his home in New York, his family said. Once described in Variety as "the quintessential New York filmmaker," Lumet shot a large number of his films in his hometown, including "The Pawnbroker," "Serpico" and many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
For half a century, hot or cool, the trial dramas of director Sidney Lumet have established a clean, gliding visual order even when there's disorder in the court. Before "Twelve Angry Men" (1957), Lumet worked in live television, a medium not conducive to a lot of fancy cutting. Now, a half-century later and a generation after "The Verdict," Lumet is back in court with the minor but well-crafted "Find Me Guilty."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
THE name Sidney Lumet conjures a certain manner of movie -- a tough, tight film filled with strong performances and an exacting sense of process, an interest in procedure and how things work. In a run of films that included "Serpico," "Dog Day Afternoon," "Network" and "Prince of the City," Lumet laid down a template that is still closely followed today.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Hollywood memoir is too often the debased offspring of ego and commerce, not so much a book as a product, the literary equivalent of, say, "The Specialist," or any other contemporary drama whose most memorable feature is the nudity of one (or both) of its stars. But filmmaker Sidney Lumet has done something remarkable: written a memoir of his life in film that is exactly that, the story of his experiences as a filmmaker. It is as dignified as the movies he's made; it fairly leaks integrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Somehow it has always felt right to me that Sidney Lumet's first film was 1957's "12 Angry Men," with all the elements that Lumet loved best. It was a dialogue-driven set piece by writer Reginald Rose that was perfect for a director who loved words. There was its powerful ensemble of actors, with Henry Fonda's lone dissenting juror facing off against Lee J. Cobb's rage. An unseen defendant's life hinged on a moral dilemma, with the jurors' debate an examination of social class and cultural perceptions as much as one man's guilt or innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2005 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
As an action star, Vin Diesel has raced cars, jumped motorcycles, and outrun space aliens. But even with such testosterone-fueled credentials, Diesel on a recent morning can barely keep up with 80-year-old director Sidney Lumet. Technically, Diesel isn't due on the set of Lumet's courtroom story "Find Me Guilty" until 9:30 a.m. But by 9 a.m., Lumet already has filmed multiple takes of the day's first scene, and is looking for his leading man, eager to move on.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1993 | STEVEN LINAN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
DGA Honor: Sidney Lumet will receive the D.W. Griffith Award, the Directors Guild of America's top honor for lifetime contribution to film, at the group's 45th annual awards dinner in New York tonight. Lumet will become the 23rd recipient of the honor, which will be presented by his peers Martin Scorsese and Milos Forman. Previous recipients include John Ford, David Lean, Billy Wilder and Robert Wise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
If you consider the Russian literary tradition, with its penchant for turning existentialism into a five-course meal, it's hard to think of many American films that would be a more appetizing choice for adaptation by Russian director Nikita Mikhalkov than "12 Angry Men," the 1957 drama that locked a jury in a room for a day to debate the fate of an alleged killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It TOOK Jenny Lumet almost three decades to find her true calling. Initially, she wanted to be an actress. And her father, director Sidney Lumet, gave her juicy role in his 1990 cop thriller "Q&A" as a drug kingpin's lover whose life becomes more complicated when her old boyfriend, now an assistant district attorney, reenters her orbit. Her reviews were pretty good, she recalls. "It wasn't a flat-out disaster by any means, but I just couldn't get another job."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Few contemporary American directors have plumbed the problem of morality quite like Sidney Lumet. Then again, few American directors have been contemporary for as long as he has. Lumet is 83, and his career has spanned half a century and more than 40 movies -- not all of them good, obviously. But the good ones are great.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
THE name Sidney Lumet conjures a certain manner of movie -- a tough, tight film filled with strong performances and an exacting sense of process, an interest in procedure and how things work. In a run of films that included "Serpico," "Dog Day Afternoon," "Network" and "Prince of the City," Lumet laid down a template that is still closely followed today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
For half a century, hot or cool, the trial dramas of director Sidney Lumet have established a clean, gliding visual order even when there's disorder in the court. Before "Twelve Angry Men" (1957), Lumet worked in live television, a medium not conducive to a lot of fancy cutting. Now, a half-century later and a generation after "The Verdict," Lumet is back in court with the minor but well-crafted "Find Me Guilty."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1991 | Ray Loynd \f7
Scot director Michael Caton-Jones ("Memphis Belle," "Scandal") has replaced Sidney Lumet on "What Makes Sammy Run?" Budd Schulberg's novel of Hollywood ambition, published 50 years ago and hibernating as a movie project since, has been in development at Warner Bros. for over a year under producer Gene Kirkwood. Kirkwood does not ascribe Lumet's departure from "Sammy" to the poor box-office performance of his last two Warners pictures, "Q&A" and "Family Business." "Things change," Kirkwood said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2006 | Susan King
With his latest film, "Find Me Guilty," 81-year-old director Sidney Lumet returns to a genre that has served him well over the past 50 years: the courtroom drama. "Guilty," which opens Friday, revolves around what is billed as the longest criminal trial in U.S. history, when 20 members of the Lucchese crime family were brought to court in 1987 on 76 charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | From Associated Press
Sidney Lumet said he overcame snobbery about action heroes to cast Vin Diesel in "Find Me Guilty," which premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival this week. Diesel, who starred in "XXX" and "The Pacifier," plays Giacomo "Fat Jack" DiNorscio, who defended himself in a 21-month trial in Newark, N.J. The trial ended in August 1988 with the acquittal on racketeering charges of DiNorscio and 19 other alleged mobsters.
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