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Sidney Moncrief

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SPORTS
October 13, 1989
Former Milwaukee Bucks guard Sidney Moncrief scheduled a news conference for today in his hometown of Little Rock, Ark., during which he is expected to announce his retirement from pro basketball.
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SPORTS
February 27, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former NBA star Sidney Moncrief has been acquitted on an aggravated assault charge brought by a business associate Moncrief hit with a golf club during an argument last year in Phoenix.
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SPORTS
February 27, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former NBA star Sidney Moncrief has been acquitted on an aggravated assault charge brought by a business associate Moncrief hit with a golf club during an argument last year in Phoenix.
SPORTS
September 2, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former NBA standout Sidney Moncrief has been arrested after allegedly hitting a man with a golf club at his automobile dealership in Glendale, Ariz., police said. Moncrief, 34, was booked into Glendale City Jail on suspicion of one count of aggravated assault.
SPORTS
September 2, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former NBA standout Sidney Moncrief has been arrested after allegedly hitting a man with a golf club at his automobile dealership in Glendale, Ariz., police said. Moncrief, 34, was booked into Glendale City Jail on suspicion of one count of aggravated assault.
SPORTS
January 11, 1990 | From Times wire services
The Bucks will retire the No. 4 worn for 10 years by Sidney Moncrief during a ceremony Tuesday night before a game with the Golden State Warriors. Moncrief, one of the most popular players in Bucks history, retired last fall after he was not re-signed by Milwaukee. Moncrief, now a Little Rock, Ark., businessman, originally said he just wanted to come back and thank the fans for their support and did not wish to have his number retired.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989
The Milwaukee Bucks will not offer a new contract to 10-year guard Sidney Moncrief, 31, who has been hindered by injuries in recent seasons. Moncrief played in 62 games last season, 56 in 1987-88 and 39 in 1986-87, averaging 12.1 points per game. "The salary cap, coupled with the age factor facing our ballclub, ultimately made the decision for us," Coach Del Harris said. "From a personal level, it is a great loss. From a franchise decision, it was one that was rather clear-cut."
SPORTS
May 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Clemon Johnson, who steals the ball about as often as the Boston Celtics lose, made the theft of his career Saturday. The steal triggered the Philadelphia 76ers to a 107-103 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks and a 2-1 lead in their NBA Eastern Conference semifinal playoff series. The 6-10, 240-pound Johnson, who had only 23 steals during the season, stripped the usually sure-handed Terry Cummings of the ball and flipped it to teammate Julius Erving.
SPORTS
May 15, 1986 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
There probably is no type of pain-killing shot that could have numbed Sidney Moncrief's agony as he witnessed Game 1 of the NBA Eastern Conference final playoff series from the end of the Milwaukee Bucks' bench Tuesday night. The pained expression on Moncrief's face might have been caused by his injured left heel and arch, which have sidelined him for about half of Milwaukee's playoff games.
SPORTS
February 16, 1986 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
It is usually not mandatory, nor even advisable, to break a sweat during game-day practices, and the Milwaukee Bucks had no intention of doing so just because Coach Don Nelson dragged them onto the court. Realizing, perhaps, that his players were working only to stay warm inside the chilly MECCA Arena, Nelson had them walk--not run--through the plays the Chicago Bulls were expected to use in that night's game.
SPORTS
January 11, 1990 | From Times wire services
The Bucks will retire the No. 4 worn for 10 years by Sidney Moncrief during a ceremony Tuesday night before a game with the Golden State Warriors. Moncrief, one of the most popular players in Bucks history, retired last fall after he was not re-signed by Milwaukee. Moncrief, now a Little Rock, Ark., businessman, originally said he just wanted to come back and thank the fans for their support and did not wish to have his number retired.
SPORTS
October 14, 1989
Sidney Moncrief, a five-time NBA All-Star dropped by the Milwaukee Bucks because of knee problems, said he is retiring to become a broadcaster for the Dallas Mavericks. Moncrief, 32, spent his entire 10-year career with the Bucks.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989
The Milwaukee Bucks will not offer a new contract to 10-year guard Sidney Moncrief, 31, who has been hindered by injuries in recent seasons. Moncrief played in 62 games last season, 56 in 1987-88 and 39 in 1986-87, averaging 12.1 points per game. "The salary cap, coupled with the age factor facing our ballclub, ultimately made the decision for us," Coach Del Harris said. "From a personal level, it is a great loss. From a franchise decision, it was one that was rather clear-cut."
SPORTS
May 15, 1986 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
There probably is no type of pain-killing shot that could have numbed Sidney Moncrief's agony as he witnessed Game 1 of the NBA Eastern Conference final playoff series from the end of the Milwaukee Bucks' bench Tuesday night. The pained expression on Moncrief's face might have been caused by his injured left heel and arch, which have sidelined him for about half of Milwaukee's playoff games.
SPORTS
May 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Clemon Johnson, who steals the ball about as often as the Boston Celtics lose, made the theft of his career Saturday. The steal triggered the Philadelphia 76ers to a 107-103 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks and a 2-1 lead in their NBA Eastern Conference semifinal playoff series. The 6-10, 240-pound Johnson, who had only 23 steals during the season, stripped the usually sure-handed Terry Cummings of the ball and flipped it to teammate Julius Erving.
SPORTS
February 16, 1986 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
It is usually not mandatory, nor even advisable, to break a sweat during game-day practices, and the Milwaukee Bucks had no intention of doing so just because Coach Don Nelson dragged them onto the court. Realizing, perhaps, that his players were working only to stay warm inside the chilly MECCA Arena, Nelson had them walk--not run--through the plays the Chicago Bulls were expected to use in that night's game.
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