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Sidney Poitier

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Lee Margulies
His walk is slow, his speech is measured, but at 86, Sidney Poitier is still a commanding presence. The Academy Award-winning actor and a founding board member of the American Film Institute in 1967 was on hand for AFI Night at the Movies at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood on Wednesday to introduce "In the Heat of the Night," the 1967 best picture winner in which he starred with Rod Steiger. Introducing films in other theaters for the AFI fund-raiser were Harrison Ford ("Blade Runner")
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Lee Margulies
His walk is slow, his speech is measured, but at 86, Sidney Poitier is still a commanding presence. The Academy Award-winning actor and a founding board member of the American Film Institute in 1967 was on hand for AFI Night at the Movies at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood on Wednesday to introduce "In the Heat of the Night," the 1967 best picture winner in which he starred with Rod Steiger. Introducing films in other theaters for the AFI fund-raiser were Harrison Ford ("Blade Runner")
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012
Who presented Sidney Poitier his lead actor Oscar for 1963's "Lilies of the Field"? Anne Bancroft
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Susan King
 "Red Tails," the World War II drama about the Tuskegee airmen, was named best picture at the 44th NAACP Image Awards on Friday evening at the Shrine Auditorium. But the evening's biggest winner was actress Kerry Washington. She won for actress in a TV drama series for ABC's "Scandal," supporting actress in a motion picture for "Django Unchained" and the NAACP President's Award in recognition of special achievement and public service. Denzel Washington won the Image Award for actor in a motion picture for "Flight," while Viola Davis earned the top actress award for "Won't Back Down.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Reviewing one of Sidney Poitier's films in the late '60s, the New York Times critic Vincent Canby noted that the actor "does not make movies, he makes milestones." Canby's point, which was not entirely a compliment, holds even truer today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By David Ng
The California African American Museum will bestow honors on actor Sidney Poitier and artist John Outterbridge at its annual gala this fall, museum officials said. Poitier and Outterbridge are to receive the museum's Lifetime Achievement Awards at a dinner on Oct. 6. Outterbridge is a Los Angeles-based artist who has focused on sculpture, assemblage and installations during his lengthy career. He served as the director of the Watts Towers Arts Center in L.A. from 1975 to 1992. His work was featured prominently in exhibitions during the Pacific Standard Time initiative, the recent survey of Southern California art organized by the Getty.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011
Sidney Poitier and Kevin Costner both starred in movies with the same title. What is it? "No Way Out"
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps the best way to throw a successful black-tie award gala is to have entertainment so dazzling that midway through the evening, it's forgotten that nights like this are by tradition terminally boring. That's what the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund did Wednesday night at the Regent Beverly Wilshire when it presented the first Thurgood Marshall Lifetime Achievement Awards to Sidney Poitier and Harry Belafonte.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
It's early morning at the Polo Lounge in Beverly Hills and all eyes in the crowded restaurant are glancing over at Sidney Poitier. It's hard not to notice him. Dressed in a pink sweater and dark slacks, the tall, lean actor looks two decades younger than his 64 years, just as if he had stepped out of "To Sir, With Love,' "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" or "In the Heat of the Night."
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | CHRIS DAFOE, Chris Dafoe is the West Coast arts correspondent for the Globe and Mail in Canada
His cowboy hat pulled low over his eyes, his long canvas coat buttoned up to ward off the cold, the tall, silent imposing man walks into the big house in the middle of the prairie. As he enters it's apparent that he's viewed with respect, even awe, by virtually everyone on the set. Glancing around, he acknowledges the attention with a nod and a small, tight smile. Then, without a word, he goes to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By David Ng
The California African American Museum will bestow honors on actor Sidney Poitier and artist John Outterbridge at its annual gala this fall, museum officials said. Poitier and Outterbridge are to receive the museum's Lifetime Achievement Awards at a dinner on Oct. 6. Outterbridge is a Los Angeles-based artist who has focused on sculpture, assemblage and installations during his lengthy career. He served as the director of the Watts Towers Arts Center in L.A. from 1975 to 1992. His work was featured prominently in exhibitions during the Pacific Standard Time initiative, the recent survey of Southern California art organized by the Getty.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012
Who presented Sidney Poitier his lead actor Oscar for 1963's "Lilies of the Field"? Anne Bancroft
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011
Sidney Poitier and Kevin Costner both starred in movies with the same title. What is it? "No Way Out"
IMAGE
October 31, 2010 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From onstage at the 32nd Carousel of Hope, emcee Jay Leno surveyed the crowd before him, describing the gala as one where "the audience is more famous than you. " The Oct. 23 affair at the Beverly Hilton had no shortage of star-power onstage or off. Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson and Randy Jackson came to present awards to Maria Shriver and Quincy Jones; Jennifer Lopez, Marc Anthony, Gladys Knight and the rapper Akon performed; and the audience included Raquel...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010 | By Steve Ryfle
For much of the 1950s and '60s, Sidney Poitier was the standard-bearer for all of black Hollywood, his stardom held aloft as a beacon of integration and progress. In reality, the movie industry remained largely segregated and out of step with the developments of the civil rights era; the Poitier mythology not only obscured this truth, but it also dwarfed the contributions of other African American actors, some of whom paved the way for Poitier's ascent. No one deserves more credit for presaging the stereotype-breaking characters that Poitier perfected than James Edwards, who, in 1949, shot from anonymity to stardom in producer Stanley Kramer's controversial, race-infused war melodrama, "Home of the Brave."
NATIONAL
July 31, 2009 | Mark Silva
President Obama, attempting to spotlight those who have acted as "agents of change," announced Thursday that he would bestow the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country's highest civilian honor, on a cast of living and deceased figures widely known in politics, the arts and sciences, sports and social movements. The 16 honorees named by the White House include Harvey Milk, the San Francisco supervisor who led an early movement for gay rights in public life and was assassinated.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This man endured what most men cannot even contemplate," Sidney Poitier says of the indomitable South African leader Nelson Mandela. Poitier stars as the man who became an international symbol of freedom in Showtime's "Mandela and De Klerk," which can be seen Sunday. Shot on location in South Africa last year, the docudrama chronicles Mandela's harrowing years as a political prisoner to his election as leader of the new democratic nation in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Reviewing one of Sidney Poitier's films in the late '60s, the New York Times critic Vincent Canby noted that the actor "does not make movies, he makes milestones." Canby's point, which was not entirely a compliment, holds even truer today.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Steve Ryfle, Special to The Times
In 1967, Sidney Poitier had three box-office smashes: "To Sir, With Love," "In the Heat of the Night," and "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?" It was the career apex of a trailblazing actor who had vaulted over Hollywood's color barrier to become Hollywood's first black leading man, upturning the stereotypical roles inhabited by Butterfly McQueen, Stepin Fetchit and the like.
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