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Sidney Rittenberg

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NEWS
April 26, 1993 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a classic New Yorker cartoon from the 1950s, a hipster bebop musician, complete with goatee and beret, sits by his little boy's bed to tuck him in. But the kid wants a story and cajoles: "Daddy! Tell one more time how jazz came up the river from New Orleans!" The Chinese Revolution is a lot like that.
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WORLD
November 3, 2004 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to China, Sidney Rittenberg simply can't resist a revolution. In the 1940s, it was the Communists who had the best thing going. So he became the first U.S. citizen admitted to the Chinese Communist Party and served in the regime's propaganda machine to promote the cause. Today, it's the capitalists' turn, and the 83-year-old former cadre is a six-figure business consultant, helping the likes of Levi Strauss & Co. and Intel Corp.
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WORLD
November 3, 2004 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to China, Sidney Rittenberg simply can't resist a revolution. In the 1940s, it was the Communists who had the best thing going. So he became the first U.S. citizen admitted to the Chinese Communist Party and served in the regime's propaganda machine to promote the cause. Today, it's the capitalists' turn, and the 83-year-old former cadre is a six-figure business consultant, helping the likes of Levi Strauss & Co. and Intel Corp.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a classic New Yorker cartoon from the 1950s, a hipster bebop musician, complete with goatee and beret, sits by his little boy's bed to tuck him in. But the kid wants a story and cajoles: "Daddy! Tell one more time how jazz came up the river from New Orleans!" The Chinese Revolution is a lot like that.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2004 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
"To get rich is glorious." With that catchy slogan, Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping is credited with unleashing a revolution that transformed a nation of Mao jackets and people's communes into a land of Starbucks-drinking, Gucci-loving techies.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2009 | Don Lee
With the Beijing Olympics over, China is counting down to its next big coming-out party: the Expo 2010 World's Fair in Shanghai. But will the U.S. show up? With construction deadlines approaching, organizers of the American exhibit are scrambling to come up with tens of millions of dollars from corporate sponsors for a national pavilion. The recession has only added to longer-running problems that could end up with the U.S.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | TED ANTHONY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 11-year-old boy with the white face and the unruly hair knocked on the apartment door in Building No. 9 of the Beijing Friendship Hotel. A Chinese woman in black slippers answered, smiled and invited him inside. It was a gray fall day, barely two years after the Cultural Revolution ended. Portraits of the late Chairman Mao were everywhere. After two months here, the boy was still bewildered by all this. It was nothing like Pittsburgh, nothing like home. The boy was skipping school.
NEWS
November 6, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neither the collapse of the technology bubble, the slowing economy nor even a terrorist attack can dull Li Yuanhao's enthusiasm for investing in the United States. Li is one of several investors from China who see an opportunity to buy U.S. technology and management expertise at a discount.
WORLD
February 11, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
In 1969, a pale, gangly 15-year-old walked down a dirt road flanked by desiccated yellow cliffs from which generations of Chinese farmers had eked out a subsistence living. The path led to Liangjiahe, a village in central China where the Communist Party was sending city youths to do hard labor during the Cultural Revolution. For nearly seven years, Xi Jinping lived there, making a cave his home. A thin quilt spread on bricks was his bed, a bucket was his toilet. Dinners were a porridge of millet and raw grain.
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