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Sidney Sheldon

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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sidney Sheldon, 75, has had a prolific career. He penned the screenplays for some 30 motion pictures, including "Easter Parade," "Anything Goes" and "The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer," for which he won an Oscar. A top Broadway playwright at 25, he had three musical hits simultaneously: "The Merry Widow," "Jackpot" and "Dream With Music." TV viewers know him as the creator of such series as "The Patty Duke Show," "I Dream of Jeannie" and "Hart to Hart."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Deborah Raffin, a film actress, veteran of television miniseries and entrepreneur whose company, Dove Books-on-Tape, became a major force in the audio book industry, died Wednesday of leukemia at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. She was 59. She was diagnosed with the blood cancer about a year ago, said her brother, William. The blond, California-born actress first came to attention in the mid-1970s playing "pretty girl" roles in movies such as "Forty Carats" with Liv Ullman and "Once Is Not Enough," based on the salacious novel by Jacqueline Susann.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2007 | Bettijane Levine and Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writers
Sidney Sheldon, a writer whose keen grasp of popular tastes fueled a string of feverishly romantic and suspenseful books that made him a perennial bestseller with millions of copies in print around the world, died Tuesday. He was 89. Sheldon died of pneumonia at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, according to his friend and publicist Warren Cowan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Special to The Times
The last time I saw Sidney Sheldon, he was holding court at an "A" table at Mr. Chow in Beverly Hills. As I recall the scene, a writer of a certain age was paying obeisance to Sheldon by presenting the grand master with a copy of his own new book, a biography of a dead Hollywood celebrity. Both men were attired in the crisply pressed shirts and expertly tailored blazers and slacks that Sheldon himself would have described as "dapper," a favorite adjective in the books that he wrote.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The stretch limousines stretched out the driveway and down the block. The Rolls-Royces rolled in one after another. It was a busy night at Jimmy's, where author Sidney Sheldon was inside celebrating his recent marriage with his bride, Alexandra Kostoff Sheldon. The couple were married Oct. 14 in Las Vegas in what Sidney Sheldon described as "a very private ceremony, just family, no friends." After a stay at Caesars Palace, they honeymooned in New England and spent a week reviving at La Costa.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2004 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
To heck with high art. It's time to check in on Sidney Sheldon, the prince of potboilers, a man ignored by the literati for almost 40 years and none the worse for it. Sheldon has sold 300 million books. He is the most translated author in the world, according to Guinness' book of records. And he's a Southern California icon, like the Hollywood sign, and just as taken for granted. And now, at 87, Sheldon's become a kind of geriatric phenomenon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There are serious accusations of ageism leveled against Hollywood's hiring of writers and directors. One of the given reasons is that only young creators know how to address a young audience. The other and more probable reason is that so many of the hiring executives are very young and uncomfortable about hiring those who are older and more experienced than themselves.
BOOKS
November 3, 1991 | Mary Herczog
THE DOOMSDAY CONSPIRACY, by Sidney Sheldon (William Morrow: $22; 400 pp.). A manly yet sensitive hero, governmental cover-ups, wanton violence, UFOs and a tacked-on save-the-planet message--what else could you need? Realism? Pshaw. Even by Sidney Sheldon standards this is weak, with more than the usual number of holes and silliness plus a concluding twist that is easily guessed by the fifth chapter. Navy Intelligence Comdr.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Writer Sidney Sheldon, who won an Academy Award for "The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer," a Tony Award for "Redhead" and then went on to become a bestselling novelist ("The Other Side of Midnight," "Rage of Angels"), announced Tuesday that he is donating his literary archives to the UCLA Library. The material includes notes, correspondence and manuscripts from throughout his career, which includes the creation of the TV series "The Patty Duke Show," "I Dream of Jeannie" and "Hart to Hart."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996
Talk-show host Larry King and author Sidney Sheldon will be honored at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Sept. 11 at the 41st anniversary Golden Bell Dinner, a fund-raiser for the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group Portals, which provides mental health rehabilitation services to the homeless and mentally ill. "Politically Incorrect" host Bill Maher will perform at the event; Ed McMahon will emcee. Tickets are $250. Information: (213) 387-1129.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2007 | Bettijane Levine and Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writers
Sidney Sheldon, a writer whose keen grasp of popular tastes fueled a string of feverishly romantic and suspenseful books that made him a perennial bestseller with millions of copies in print around the world, died Tuesday. He was 89. Sheldon died of pneumonia at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, according to his friend and publicist Warren Cowan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Writer Sidney Sheldon, who won an Academy Award for "The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer," a Tony Award for "Redhead" and then went on to become a bestselling novelist ("The Other Side of Midnight," "Rage of Angels"), announced Tuesday that he is donating his literary archives to the UCLA Library. The material includes notes, correspondence and manuscripts from throughout his career, which includes the creation of the TV series "The Patty Duke Show," "I Dream of Jeannie" and "Hart to Hart."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2004 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
To heck with high art. It's time to check in on Sidney Sheldon, the prince of potboilers, a man ignored by the literati for almost 40 years and none the worse for it. Sheldon has sold 300 million books. He is the most translated author in the world, according to Guinness' book of records. And he's a Southern California icon, like the Hollywood sign, and just as taken for granted. And now, at 87, Sheldon's become a kind of geriatric phenomenon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Sidney, among the last surviving directors of MGM's beloved Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and early '50s, died Sunday of lymphoma at his Las Vegas home. He was 86. At his side were his wife, Corinne Entratter Sidney, and his stepson, Ben.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | MANUEL GAMIZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Author Sidney Sheldon has won an Oscar, a Tony and an Edgar Allan Poe Award, among other honors, during his prolific writing career. He is even listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the most translated author, with books in 180 countries in 51 languages. Born in Chicago, Sheldon, 83, has had a distinguished career in film, television, theater and fiction writing, with 200 TV scripts, 25 motion picture scripts, six Broadway plays and 17 novels.
NEWS
December 28, 1998
In Whatever Works, we feature an interesting person discussing some aspect of his or her career or special project. Today's guest is author Sidney Sheldon, who has also written for the movies and Broadway and created television shows. * Question: What's the worst job you've ever had? Answer: Selling ladies' shoes in a department store. I had no experience and had no idea what I was doing.
MAGAZINE
September 28, 1997 | Ed Leibowitz
From the cheerful chastity of his screenplays for "The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer" (for which he won a screenwriting Oscar in 1947) and "Easter Parade," to the innocent titillation of his TV confections "I Dream of Jeannie" and "Hart to Hart," to stupendously best-selling popular fiction such as "The Other Side of Midnight," Sidney Sheldon has made a career of pulling plums out of whatever pop cultural pies he's plunged his thumb into.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996
Talk-show host Larry King and author Sidney Sheldon will be honored at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Sept. 11 at the 41st anniversary Golden Bell Dinner, a fund-raiser for the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group Portals, which provides mental health rehabilitation services to the homeless and mentally ill. "Politically Incorrect" host Bill Maher will perform at the event; Ed McMahon will emcee. Tickets are $250. Information: (213) 387-1129.
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