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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012 | By David Savage, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court has let stand a ruling that overturned murder convictions in two slayings tied to the so-called "Skid Row Stabber," who was thought to be responsible for the killing of as many as 10 homeless men in downtown Los Angeles in the late 1970s. After a lengthy trial in 1984, Bobby Joe Maxwell was convicted of two murders and sentenced to life in prison. Last year, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals set aside his convictions because a key witness for the prosecution, a jailhouse informant named Sidney Storch, had been exposed as a "habitual liar.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
A man accused of being the notorious "Skid Row Stabber," linked to a series of killings in Los Angeles during the 1970s, has been indicted on murder charges involving the slayings of three men, according to court records unsealed Tuesday. Bobby Joe Maxwell, who has spent more than 30 years behind bars, was convicted of two murders in a 1984 trial involving 10 slayings. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the two convictions in 2010, finding that a jailhouse informant who was a key prosecution witness was a habitual liar with "a long and public history of dishonesty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
A man accused of being the notorious "Skid Row Stabber," linked to a series of killings in Los Angeles during the 1970s, has been indicted on murder charges involving the slayings of three men, according to court records unsealed Tuesday. Bobby Joe Maxwell, who has spent more than 30 years behind bars, was convicted of two murders in a 1984 trial involving 10 slayings. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the two convictions in 2010, finding that a jailhouse informant who was a key prosecution witness was a habitual liar with "a long and public history of dishonesty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012 | By David Savage, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court has let stand a ruling that overturned murder convictions in two slayings tied to the so-called "Skid Row Stabber," who was thought to be responsible for the killing of as many as 10 homeless men in downtown Los Angeles in the late 1970s. After a lengthy trial in 1984, Bobby Joe Maxwell was convicted of two murders and sentenced to life in prison. Last year, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals set aside his convictions because a key witness for the prosecution, a jailhouse informant named Sidney Storch, had been exposed as a "habitual liar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first Los Angeles County jailhouse informant to be charged with perjury has died while awaiting extradition from New York. Sidney Storch died of complications from AIDS Sunday night, New York City jail authorities said. Storch, a 46-year-old heroin addict and check forger, was arrested in Queens last month on a Los Angeles indictment that charged him with lying about past favors he had received from prosecutors while testifying in 1988 as a key prosecution witness against Sheldon Sanders.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A career criminal who repeatedly won leniency for himself by testifying that people confessed murders to him has been indicted for perjury in the latest chapter in Los Angeles County's jailhouse informant scandal. Sidney Storch, a 46-year-old check forger who has been in and out of jail most of his adult life, was arrested Monday night at the Salvation Army veterans' home in New York City, where he moved after a scandal about informants faking confessions broke in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leslie White, the Los Angeles County jailhouse informant who blew the whistle on perjurers-for-hire in scores of murder cases, pleaded guilty to two counts of perjury himself Tuesday and thus became the only person to go to prison in the scandal he sparked. White was sentenced to a prison term of three years by Superior Court Judge J. Stephen Czuleger. In a telephone interview from jail, White said he regrets that no law enforcement officials were prosecuted in the scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1992 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County jailhouse informant who sparked a scandal by proving that he could concoct a believable murder confession from someone he had never met has been indicted for perjury. Leslie Vernon White, who says he has made up many confessions over the years and traded them to authorities in return for leniency, was arrested Tuesday on a grand jury indictment obtained by the state attorney general's office. He is the second informant to be charged with perjury recently. Deputy Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART and TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writers
Jailhouse informants are often rewarded for their testimony in criminal cases, even if they are not explicitly promised special treatment, documents released Tuesday indicate. Memoranda written by Los Angeles County prosecutors on their use of jailhouse informants appear to support the argument advanced by some defense attorneys that informants testify with the implicit understanding that they will receive lenient treatment from authorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court Tuesday overturned the 1984 murder convictions of an alleged serial killer dubbed the "Skid Row Stabber," calling the government's chief witness an "infamous" jailhouse informant and a habitual liar. Bobby Joe Maxwell, who has spent more than 30 years behind bars, should be given a new trial or set free, the court ruled. Maxwell was convicted of two of 10 murders attributed to the Skid Row Stabber in 1978 and 1979. The prosecution relied heavily on the testimony of Sidney Storch, one of a notorious cadre of snitches used by Los Angeles authorities in dozens of murder cases in the 1970s and '80s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first Los Angeles County jailhouse informant to be charged with perjury has died while awaiting extradition from New York. Sidney Storch died of complications from AIDS Sunday night, New York City jail authorities said. Storch, a 46-year-old heroin addict and check forger, was arrested in Queens last month on a Los Angeles indictment that charged him with lying about past favors he had received from prosecutors while testifying in 1988 as a key prosecution witness against Sheldon Sanders.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A career criminal who repeatedly won leniency for himself by testifying that people confessed murders to him has been indicted for perjury in the latest chapter in Los Angeles County's jailhouse informant scandal. Sidney Storch, a 46-year-old check forger who has been in and out of jail most of his adult life, was arrested Monday night at the Salvation Army veterans' home in New York City, where he moved after a scandal about informants faking confessions broke in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1988 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
The lawyer for accused murderer Harvey Rader said Thursday that he plans to assert in court that a Los Angeles police detective tried to arrange a fabricated confession by having Rader placed with informants in jail. The detective denied the charge, saying all he had done was tell jail officials accurately that Rader had once been an informant. Jail officials said they then decided on their own to house Rader with informants for his safety.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH and ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writers
When veteran jailhouse informant Leslie Vernon White picked up a telephone last fall and showed authorities how easily he could fake the confession of another inmate, he cracked open a window on a secret world. At any given time, Los Angeles County jails hold between 50 and 100 informants--many of them career criminals like White--who have engaged in relentless campaigns to implicate their fellow prisoners in crimes and thus earn the ultimate favor from authorities: early release from custody.
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