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Sidney Taurel

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BUSINESS
December 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
John Lechleiter will become Eli Lilly & Co.'s chief executive, replacing Sidney Taurel, as the company faces the loss of $6.8 billion in sales to generic competition within six years. Lechleiter, 54, chief operating officer since October 2005, will become president and CEO on April 1. Taurel, 58, who has led Indianapolis-based Lilly since July 1998, will remain chairman until the end of 2008.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 1998
Aetna Inc. said first-quarter profit fell about 18% to $146.6 million, or 90 cents a diluted share, from a year ago, beating expectations of 84 cents, as its retirement-services and international operations helped offset higher medical costs in its health business. Revenue rose 3% to $4.63 billion. * Eli Lilly & Co. said Randall Tobias will step down as chief executive in July and as chairman at the end of the year, five years after the 56-year-old executive moved from AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Eli Lilly & Co. said Randall Tobias will step down as chief executive in July and as chairman at the end of the year, five years after the 56-year-old executive moved from AT&T Corp. to take charge of the Indianapolis-based drug maker. Sidney Taurel, 49, president and chief operating officer, will take over as CEO on July 1 and become chairman when Tobias steps down.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday turned away the claims of generic drug manufacturers and ruled valid a patent for Eli Lilly & Co.'s drug Zyprexa. U.S. District Judge Richard Young in Indianapolis ruled in favor of Lilly on all of the matters in dispute in the case, Lilly said. However, appeals are likely. The ruling is a huge relief to Lilly, Chief Executive Sidney Taurel said.
OPINION
August 16, 2006
INDRA NOOYI, THE NEW chief executive of PepsiCo, isn't just the 11th woman to lead a Fortune 500 company. She's also the latest of a growing number of foreign-born executives who do so. Globalization may be a tiresome buzzword in some circles, but in corporate America it's a practical necessity. Nooyi was born and raised in India. Douglas N. Daft, her onetime counterpart at Coca-Cola, is Australian. Her counterpart at Coke now, E. Neville Isdell, is from Ireland.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. said Thursday that it would settle about 18,000 additional lawsuits alleging the drug maker did not adequately warn patients that its antipsychotic medication Zyprexa heightens the risk of diabetes. Lilly did not disclose the amount of the settlement but said in a statement that it would take a fourth-quarter settlement charge that's not expected to exceed $500 million.
OPINION
December 22, 2002 | Frank del Olmo, Frank del Olmo is associate editor of The Times.
There is good news and bad this holiday season regarding my son, Frankie, and other children like him who have autism. Frankie is 10 now, and the good news involves his personal progress against the neurological disorder that impairs a child's ability to speak, learn and respond to people. The bad news involves political shenanigans that could deny many autistic children the costly therapies my wife, Magdalena, and I fought so hard to get for Frankie.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2001 | MARK JEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eli Lilly & Co. is finding there's life after Prozac. Less than four months after Lilly watched income from its blockbuster antidepressant drop to a trickle with the emergence of a generic equivalent, the company is counting on a newly approved blood-infection drug to pick up some of the slack. Xigris and eight other drugs Lilly intends to bring to market over the next three years have the Indianapolis-based drug maker convinced it will prosper without Prozac.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pioneering antidepressant Prozac could be available in generic form within the next six months to a year, saving hundreds of millions of dollars annually in health-care costs as consumers switch to a less costly version of the popular drug. Under a decision issued Wednesday by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, the patent for Prozac, which is made by pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly & Co., should expire in 2001, not in 2003 as the company had argued.
HEALTH
May 21, 2001 | SHANKAR VEDANTAM, WASHINGTON POST
The woman in the television ad tries to pull a grocery shopping cart from a line. It refuses to budge. She yanks with increasing ferocity as her frustration mounts. "It's that week before your period," a voice intones, "the irritability . . . mood swings . .. bloating. . . . Think it's PMS? Think again. It could be PMDD."
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