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Sidney Yates

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mr. Yates came to Washington when Harry S. Truman was president, and left when William Jefferson Clinton was in the White House. Sidney R. Yates, the oldest and longest-serving member of the House until his retirement last year, died at a Washington hospital Thursday at 91. The congressman from Chicago will best be remembered as a fervent defender of arts funding in America who fought efforts by conservatives to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mr. Yates came to Washington when Harry S. Truman was president, and left when William Jefferson Clinton was in the White House. Sidney R. Yates, the oldest and longest-serving member of the House until his retirement last year, died at a Washington hospital Thursday at 91. The congressman from Chicago will best be remembered as a fervent defender of arts funding in America who fought efforts by conservatives to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts.
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OPINION
September 14, 1997 | Faye Fiore, Faye Fiore covers the National Endowment for the Arts and California affairs in Washington for The Times
When young Sidney R. Yates first campaigned for Congress in 1948, it was probably not apparent to the good people of Chicago that they were about to elect a man who would become one of the greatest champions of the arts America had ever seen. Indeed, as Yates crooned for votes at a bingo game, accompanying himself with three chords on his oompah guitar, voters might have decided the most merciful thing they could do for the arts was elect him just so he'd stop singing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1997
Re the Sept. 14 Opinion interview with Sidney Yates, "Fighting for Arts Funding in America": Rep. Yates just doesn't get it after 50 years. It is not the art or the controversy of the art--it's my (the taxpayer's) money. Anyone who tries to make a comparison of the Department of Defense to the National Endowment for the Arts is clearly out of touch with the big picture. If NEA money goes to a string quartet so they can have fun and play music in Jepson, Iowa, that's nice. But I work hard all day. I have so much money taxed out of my paycheck for these pet programs I am beginning to think I should go out and take some violin lessons and get a grant from the NEA. That would sure beat slugging it out in the traffic every day. JOHN N. ENGELS Northridge
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1997
Re the Sept. 14 Opinion interview with Sidney Yates, "Fighting for Arts Funding in America": Rep. Yates just doesn't get it after 50 years. It is not the art or the controversy of the art--it's my (the taxpayer's) money. Anyone who tries to make a comparison of the Department of Defense to the National Endowment for the Arts is clearly out of touch with the big picture. If NEA money goes to a string quartet so they can have fun and play music in Jepson, Iowa, that's nice. But I work hard all day. I have so much money taxed out of my paycheck for these pet programs I am beginning to think I should go out and take some violin lessons and get a grant from the NEA. That would sure beat slugging it out in the traffic every day. JOHN N. ENGELS Northridge
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK and ALLAN PARACHINI
The Arts' Three Most Influential Advocates in Congress REP. SIDNEY YATES, 80, Illinois Democrat. First elected 1948. District includes parts of the north side of Chicago and North Shore suburbs, including Evanston. Yates' personal arts preferences include modern sculpture and painting (of which he has an extensive collection), music and dance. Not a member of the Congressional Arts Caucus. Member of the House Appropriations Committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
Rep. Fred Grandy (R-Iowa) peers across the huge, wood desk in his private digs in the Cannon House Office Building, drawing a careful parallel between Hollywood and Washington--both of which, he says, are "one-industry towns fueled by gossip." "When I was first a staffer here on the Hill," Grandy says, gesturing in the direction of a block of restaurants and shops not far from the Capitol, "there was a little joint up there that was a watering hole for members of Congress and their staffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The settling of dust after the fractious censorship crisis that gripped the National Endowment for the Arts from early April until a Senate vote Saturday makes clear that politicians and the arts lost on almost every front. It will be a while before results are known of the prolonged focus of media and political attention on artistic freedom of expression--and on the limits to which public funding of the arts may be taken in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
NEA Budget Action: A House subcommittee in Washington voted Thursday to increase the 1992 budget of the National Endowment for the Arts by $3 million--to a total of $178 million for the fiscal year. The Bush Administration, in an apparent rebuke to the controversy-torn federal arts agency, had recommended no change in the NEA's appropriation from this year's $175 million. The action in the subcommittee chaired by Rep. Sidney Yates (D-Ill.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | From the Washington Post
President Clinton has selected actress Jane Alexander as chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, according to Capitol Hill sources. The appointment could be announced as early as next week. Alexander's appointment has been sought by many members of the New York and Washington political and cultural communities, including artist Frank Stella, actor Michael Douglas, writer E.L. Doctorow, Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.) and Rep. Sidney R. Yates (D-Ill.), who helped create the NEA in 1965.
OPINION
September 14, 1997 | Faye Fiore, Faye Fiore covers the National Endowment for the Arts and California affairs in Washington for The Times
When young Sidney R. Yates first campaigned for Congress in 1948, it was probably not apparent to the good people of Chicago that they were about to elect a man who would become one of the greatest champions of the arts America had ever seen. Indeed, as Yates crooned for votes at a bingo game, accompanying himself with three chords on his oompah guitar, voters might have decided the most merciful thing they could do for the arts was elect him just so he'd stop singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
Rep. Fred Grandy (R-Iowa) peers across the huge, wood desk in his private digs in the Cannon House Office Building, drawing a careful parallel between Hollywood and Washington--both of which, he says, are "one-industry towns fueled by gossip." "When I was first a staffer here on the Hill," Grandy says, gesturing in the direction of a block of restaurants and shops not far from the Capitol, "there was a little joint up there that was a watering hole for members of Congress and their staffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK and ALLAN PARACHINI
The Arts' Three Most Influential Advocates in Congress REP. SIDNEY YATES, 80, Illinois Democrat. First elected 1948. District includes parts of the north side of Chicago and North Shore suburbs, including Evanston. Yates' personal arts preferences include modern sculpture and painting (of which he has an extensive collection), music and dance. Not a member of the Congressional Arts Caucus. Member of the House Appropriations Committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The settling of dust after the fractious censorship crisis that gripped the National Endowment for the Arts from early April until a Senate vote Saturday makes clear that politicians and the arts lost on almost every front. It will be a while before results are known of the prolonged focus of media and political attention on artistic freedom of expression--and on the limits to which public funding of the arts may be taken in the United States.
NEWS
November 21, 1985 | United Press International
The House Appropriations Committee, unswayed by Californians' pleas to give them a bargaining tool, refused today by one vote to extend an offshore leasing ban for another year. The panel voted 26 to 27 against prolonging a moratorium on leasing along much of the California coast. The amendment seeking to extend the moratorium was offered by Rep. Sidney R. Yates (D-Ill.), chairman of the subcommittee dealing with the Interior Department.
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