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May 4, 1986
Abba Eban in the opening paragraph of his otherwise unexceptionable review of my book "The Siege" provides a definition of siege which he ascribes to "the dictionary." I wonder whether he would tell your readers which dictionary? It is not the definition provided either by Webster or by the Oxford English Dictionary, and it doesn't represent standard English usage. What it describes--absolutely accurately--is the condition which all besiegers aim to bring about. In my title I use siege in its generally accepted meaning: an effort to cut off the besieged party and bring about its surrender.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | Sandy Banks
At this point, it may not matter much to the public what actually went on in that Santa Monica High classroom where a teacher was recorded wrestling a student to the floor. The 58-second cellphone clip recorded by a student went viral this week, turning the teacher and the student into symbols of what's wrong with public schools: Defiant students. Overwhelmed teachers. Feckless administrators. Knee-jerk policies with no room for common sense. "We're in the middle of a cultural change, and this case reflects that shift," said Shawn McMullen Chen, a high school teacher for 25 years.
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WORLD
September 22, 2013 | By Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Israeli advisors were reported to be helping Kenya's government try to free hostages held by terrorist gunmen in an upscale shopping mall, after an attack that killed at least 59 people and wounded 175, but President Uhuru Kenyatta said the rescue attempt remained a domestic operation. "For the time being, this remains an operation of the Kenyan security agencies. I thank all our international friends who have reached out to us and stood with us," Kenyatta said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Robert Abele
After a strong Olympic showing, Russia isn't securing Oscar gold with "Stalingrad," which was submitted for the foreign-language film Academy Award but didn't make the final list of nominees. But there's plenty of competitively epic epicness on display nonetheless. If you're making the first Russian film to be released in 3-D and Imax, after all, why not scorch the screen with the blood, fire, ash and emotion swirling around the decisive Eastern Front battle of World War II? Director Fedor Bondarchuk's fervidly realized, effects-laden set pieces include a torturous Volga river crossing, a blazing fuel depot, a plane crash and grueling firefights between German and Russian forces camped out in decimated buildings.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2011 | Times staff and wire reports
VICKSBURG, MISS. — This historic Civil War city, which withstood a 47-day Union Army siege before its surrender in 1863, faced a different kind of invasion Monday as flooding threatened to top an earthen levee. The city is perched atop a bluff overlooking the river, and the Vicksburg National Military Park marking the Civil War battle is not threatened, the National Park Service said. But areas nearby are in peril. The water level at Vicksburg had reached nearly 56.7 feet, several inches above the record of 56.2 feet set in 1927, the National Weather Service said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2011 | Steve Lopez
Today, a blended cocktail to celebrate the start of summer. L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Frank and Jamie McCourt. More fireworks in Costa Mesa. And mounting evidence that Southern California is under attack. As for the latter, I'm still sorting through a bulging sack of mail. It's from readers under siege from the spread of eastern fox squirrels , who arrived decades ago in California and are now gluttonously wiping out backyard crops. That's what happened to the exasperated subject of my Sunday column — a battle-weary Beverlee Nelson ofNorth Hollywood.
WORLD
August 25, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
CAIRO - In one of the many videos from Wednesday's alleged chemical attack in Syria, a father holds the lifeless body of his daughter. On the ground at his feet lay the body of another daughter. "Before, I put out food for her and she said, 'Dad, today is not my turn for food, it's my siblings' turn,'" the man said, referring to bread and food shortages in their town caused by the government's siege. "And the hunger, what are we supposed to do?" The grief-stricken father was talking about the rebel-controlled Ghouta Sharqia area, suburbs east of Damascus, where a months-long siege has prevented food, medicine and other aid from reaching the towns outside the capital.
WORLD
September 22, 2013 | By Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya - Security forces launched what they called a final assault late Sunday against Somali militants holed up in a high-end shopping mall, claiming they had freed most of the hostages being held by the gunmen and seized control of much of the building. Military and police helicopters circled low over the multi-story Westgate mall and gunfire rang out throughout the day. As darkness fell, beginning the second night of the siege, a large explosion shook the area. The Kenya National Disaster Operation Center said a major operation was unfolding to end the terrorist attack that killed at least 68 people and injured 175. PHOTOS: Kenya mall attack "This will end tonight," it declared.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994
Writer-director Phil Alden Robinson ("Field of Dreams") will present footage taken during the siege of Sarajevo at the Los Angeles Public Library's Central Library on Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Mark Taper Auditorium. Hosted by the Central Library, PEN Center USA West and the Hollywood Policy Center, "Reflections on Bosnia" will also feature Maher Mathout, senior adviser to the Muslim Public Affairs Council; Matthew Naythons, author of "Sarajevo: A Portrait of the Siege"; and Michael J.
BOOKS
July 19, 1992
In his review of "Way Past Cool" (April 19), Robert Ward refers to "Warren Miller's great novel 'Harlem'--a book that should be in print permanently." I was gratified to read this appreciation of my late brother's work, but would like to note that the correct title of the novel Mr. Ward mentions is "The Siege of Harlem." Warren Miller, who died in 1966 at the age of 44, was also the author of another novel about Harlem, the much- acclaimed "The Cool World." GITA FLAUM BEVERLY HILLS
SPORTS
January 13, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Baseball was drained of its charm and innocence long ago, when it went from being a kids' game to the multibillion-dollar enterprise we know as Baseball Inc. Now the sad spectacle involving Alex Rodriguez and his former drug dealer, Tony Bosch, is robbing the sport of what remains of its heart and soul. Actually "sport" may no longer be the right word, since it implies there is a winner and a loser. Clearly there are no winners in a process that involves liars, drug cheats, death threats, clandestine payments, blood drawn in the bathroom stall of a South Florida nightclub and more shady characters than an episode of "The Sopranos.
WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim
TEHRAN -- The Iranian capital has long been known for its smog, but pollution in recent days has taken an eye-watering turn for the worse, hampering visibility and causing authorities to shutter schools and curtail the number of cars allowed in the city center. Children and the elderly have been told to stay indoors if possible, and the smog has forced even healthy residents to cut back on strolls and jogs. On Wednesday, only cars with license plates ending in even numbers were permitted on downtown streets.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Michael McGough
On April 15, 1974, William Shockley, the Nobel laureate who believed that blacks were less intelligent than whites, was supposed to debate William Rusher, the publisher of the National Review, at Yale University on the topic: “Resolved: That society has a moral obligation to diagnose and treat tragic racial IQ inferiority.” The debate never occurred. As a faculty commission impaneled to study free expression at Yale later reported: “For the first time in memory a speaker tried to speak at a scheduled appearance at Yale and was prevented from doing so by organized disruption....
WORLD
October 29, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
For many months, people in the Damascus suburb of Muadhamiya have arisen with uncertainty: the unknown of whether, or how much, they would eat. "You wake up in the morning and your only concern is to find something to eat," Qusai Zakarya, 27, a member of the town's opposition council, said by Skype. "Perhaps today we won't find food, or perhaps we will find a handful of vegetables and can make some salad. " Weighing hunger against the risk of shelling or sniper fire by Syrian government forces, some venture to the town's outer fields and orchards to forage for vegetables and herbs.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Leon Logothetis
"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear" -- Nelson Mandela As I continue to travel across the world relying on the kindness of strangers -- launched from L.A. on Aug. 10 -- I have had the good fortune of spending time in some truly inspiring cities. My latest stop saw me arrive in the capital of Bosnia Herzegovina from Zagreb, Croatia. A local described Sarajevo as the 'Jerusalem of the Balkans', and I soon felt why. There was an energy permeating through this city that cannot be explained adequately in words.
WORLD
September 27, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- When four large explosions reverberated through Nairobi's Westgate shopping mall during a terrorist siege Monday, sending a pall of black smoke into the air, the official Kenyan response -- that the militants had set fire to mattresses -- strained credulity. Later, the same official, Interior Minister Joseph Ole Lenku, blamed the gunmen for the collapse of a section of the mall, which is believed to have buried some hostages and possibly some militants as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Robert Abele
After a strong Olympic showing, Russia isn't securing Oscar gold with "Stalingrad," which was submitted for the foreign-language film Academy Award but didn't make the final list of nominees. But there's plenty of competitively epic epicness on display nonetheless. If you're making the first Russian film to be released in 3-D and Imax, after all, why not scorch the screen with the blood, fire, ash and emotion swirling around the decisive Eastern Front battle of World War II? Director Fedor Bondarchuk's fervidly realized, effects-laden set pieces include a torturous Volga river crossing, a blazing fuel depot, a plane crash and grueling firefights between German and Russian forces camped out in decimated buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - When the battle was over, Marines who fought in Vietnam labeled Hill 881 South “a deadly killing zone” in the long siege of Khe Sanh . Twenty-seven Marines were killed and 50 wounded - in all, 75% of the force that had been sent that day in April 1967 to wrest the hill from the dug-in enemy. (Khe Sanh was the scene of protracted sieges in 1967 and 1968.) Marine losses would have been even greater except for the courage of two Marine privates who were scared of dying but more scared of letting down their buddies.
WORLD
September 27, 2013 | By Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya - Amid reports that there were unheeded warnings of a terrorist attack on Nairobi's Westgate shopping mall, turf wars between police and army units and friendly fire fatalities, a Kenyan parliamentary committee has summoned security chiefs to explain what went wrong. The security officials are expected to appear at a committee hearing next week, according to news reports Friday. "The time for responsibility and accountability has come," the committee chairman, Ndung'u Gethenji, told reporters.
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