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Siegfried Othmer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990 | GABE FUENTES
Siegfried Othmer, 50, is a physicist who has lived in Sherman Oaks since 1970. As a member of groups such as Save Open Space, the Save the Mountain Park Coalition, the Sierra Club and the Topanga Canyon Docents, he has been active in efforts to preserve and expand the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. Othmer lives with his wife, Susan, and his son, Kurt, 14. Another son, Brian, 21, is a college student. Q. What do you think the land exchange means for the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and for National Park Service efforts to preserve and expand the park?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 13, 2006
Regarding "Mexican Vote Rift Bad for Business," Aug. 2: If the continuing demonstrations in Mexico are hurting business, very quickly it becomes more economical simply to recount the ballots. In fact, if the Mexican government does not avail itself of that obvious remedy, one does smell a rat. One could even do the recount piecewise, starting with the most questionable regions. As new vote counts come in to be compared with previous ones, one can begin to project the effects, and thus the case will build to either count even more votes over again or abandon the quest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991
We seem to be ever so much more creative when it comes to waging war than when it comes to designing peace. The best way to take the wind out of Hussein's sails is to have an international peace conference about the Middle East without him. He can come after he leaves Kuwait and puts up his sword. SIEGFRIED OTHMER Sherman Oaks
OPINION
April 24, 2006
Re "Bratton's 'broken windows,' " Opinion, April 20 Professor Bernard E. Harcourt's criticism of Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton's adherence to the "broken windows" theory of dealing with crime misses the mark. Law enforcement should be mostly concerned with working closely with the individual, widely varying communities that make up the city. Law enforcement generally has done a much better job the last decade in partnering with neighborhoods and finding out what the people think are the problems that should have priority attention.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2006
Regarding "Mexican Vote Rift Bad for Business," Aug. 2: If the continuing demonstrations in Mexico are hurting business, very quickly it becomes more economical simply to recount the ballots. In fact, if the Mexican government does not avail itself of that obvious remedy, one does smell a rat. One could even do the recount piecewise, starting with the most questionable regions. As new vote counts come in to be compared with previous ones, one can begin to project the effects, and thus the case will build to either count even more votes over again or abandon the quest.
OPINION
March 29, 2005
Re "A Ray of Hope for Solar," editorial, March 24: The best way to introduce solar energy is to combine economic considerations with other worthy objectives, such as our security. We should prepare for emergency situations in which the grid goes down and distribution of fossil fuels is temporarily disrupted. Emergency services should be gradually equipped with a solar energy resource to complement backup generators. As a next step, we could equip other facilities, such as schools, with such backup, as these might serve as shelters during emergencies.
OPINION
April 24, 2006
Re "Bratton's 'broken windows,' " Opinion, April 20 Professor Bernard E. Harcourt's criticism of Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton's adherence to the "broken windows" theory of dealing with crime misses the mark. Law enforcement should be mostly concerned with working closely with the individual, widely varying communities that make up the city. Law enforcement generally has done a much better job the last decade in partnering with neighborhoods and finding out what the people think are the problems that should have priority attention.
OPINION
May 19, 1985
One of the curious non-issues of our time is the sale of Hughes Aircraft Co. to another of our large corporate entities. Such a sale is assumed to yield the largest return to the current owner, the Hughes Medical Institute, and the fiduciary responsibilities of the institute's trustees apparently are solely to obtain the highest immediate return, thus limiting the options to be considered. There have been times in the past when the U.S. government, properly regarding Hughes as a critical national asset, limited the options of company ownership in pursuing its own corporate goals.
OPINION
January 12, 2003
Re "Bush Offers Tax Cuts to Spur Growth," Jan. 8: There is a better alternative to the president's proposed economic stimulus plan. It is to have the federal government increase its revenue-sharing with states. State budgets are falling into severe deficit around the country. California is only the worst example. Does it make sense to massively cut back on services such as health care, education and highway construction at the state level while at another level we cut taxes to boost the economy?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990
Siegfried Othmer, 50, is a physicist who has lived in Sherman Oaks since 1970. As a member of groups such as Save Open Space, the Save the Mountain Park Coalition, the Sierra Club and the Topanga Canyon Docents, he has been active in efforts to preserve and expand the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. Othmer lives with his wife, Susan, and his son, Kurt, 14. Another son, Brian, 21, is a college student. Q.
OPINION
March 29, 2005
Re "A Ray of Hope for Solar," editorial, March 24: The best way to introduce solar energy is to combine economic considerations with other worthy objectives, such as our security. We should prepare for emergency situations in which the grid goes down and distribution of fossil fuels is temporarily disrupted. Emergency services should be gradually equipped with a solar energy resource to complement backup generators. As a next step, we could equip other facilities, such as schools, with such backup, as these might serve as shelters during emergencies.
OPINION
January 12, 2003
Re "Bush Offers Tax Cuts to Spur Growth," Jan. 8: There is a better alternative to the president's proposed economic stimulus plan. It is to have the federal government increase its revenue-sharing with states. State budgets are falling into severe deficit around the country. California is only the worst example. Does it make sense to massively cut back on services such as health care, education and highway construction at the state level while at another level we cut taxes to boost the economy?
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | GORDON MONSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Gordon Monson is a regular contributor to The Times
To the uninitiated, it sounds weird, strange, even screwy, but to Siegfried Othmer--and numerous others who swear that it really works--the notion is lyrical: You can train your brain. Adults can train their brains. Children can train their brains. More precisely, they can alter their brain waves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991
We seem to be ever so much more creative when it comes to waging war than when it comes to designing peace. The best way to take the wind out of Hussein's sails is to have an international peace conference about the Middle East without him. He can come after he leaves Kuwait and puts up his sword. SIEGFRIED OTHMER Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990
Siegfried Othmer, 50, is a physicist who has lived in Sherman Oaks since 1970. As a member of groups such as Save Open Space, the Save the Mountain Park Coalition, the Sierra Club and the Topanga Canyon Docents, he has been active in efforts to preserve and expand the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. Othmer lives with his wife, Susan, and his son, Kurt, 14. Another son, Brian, 21, is a college student. Q.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990 | GABE FUENTES
Siegfried Othmer, 50, is a physicist who has lived in Sherman Oaks since 1970. As a member of groups such as Save Open Space, the Save the Mountain Park Coalition, the Sierra Club and the Topanga Canyon Docents, he has been active in efforts to preserve and expand the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. Othmer lives with his wife, Susan, and his son, Kurt, 14. Another son, Brian, 21, is a college student. Q. What do you think the land exchange means for the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and for National Park Service efforts to preserve and expand the park?
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | GORDON MONSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Gordon Monson is a regular contributor to The Times
To the uninitiated, it sounds weird, strange, even screwy, but to Siegfried Othmer--and numerous others who swear that it really works--the notion is lyrical: You can train your brain. Adults can train their brains. Children can train their brains. More precisely, they can alter their brain waves.
OPINION
December 15, 2007
Re "The wrong way to reform term limits," Opinion, Dec. 12 The best reason to sink Proposition 93 wasn't even mentioned in this article. We were given to believe that the legislative leadership had committed itself to reforming the redistricting process. In the bargain, there would be a relaxation of term limits. Now we are presented with an opportunity to relax term limits without anything having changed on the redistricting front. Siegfried Othmer Woodland Hills
OPINION
May 19, 1985
One of the curious non-issues of our time is the sale of Hughes Aircraft Co. to another of our large corporate entities. Such a sale is assumed to yield the largest return to the current owner, the Hughes Medical Institute, and the fiduciary responsibilities of the institute's trustees apparently are solely to obtain the highest immediate return, thus limiting the options to be considered. There have been times in the past when the U.S. government, properly regarding Hughes as a critical national asset, limited the options of company ownership in pursuing its own corporate goals.
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