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Siegfried Roy

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NATIONAL
October 15, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A 600-pound tiger that nearly killed Roy Horn of the Las Vegas act of Siegfried & Roy has been released from quarantine, Clark County officials said. The 7-year-old white tiger named Montecore was isolated for 10 days to ensure it didn't have rabies, county spokeswoman Stacey Welling said. The animal had been held in isolation at the Mirage hotel-casino since the Oct. 3 attack. The 59-year-old illusionist remained in critical condition.
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The white tiger that gravely injured magician Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy in what some called an attack and others said was an effort to save the performer's life has died. Mantecore, one of the big cats that shared the stage with Siegfried & Roy in thousands of shows at the Mirage in Las Vegas , died March 19 after a brief illness. He was 17. The tiger gained worldwide notoriety on Oct. 3, 2003, when he sank his teeth into Horn's neck and dragged him off the stage during a performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1999 | RANDY MATIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Siegfried Fischbacher of "Siegfried & Roy" fame was first approached about doing a 3-D Imax film about the pair's spectacularly successful Las Vegas act, he was less than thrilled. "I need this movie like I need a hole in the head," he told filmmaker Brett Leonard. Leonard understood their reluctance. "I knew they wanted to make a larger film then just one to show off their success. And I realized that theirs is an archetypal story. I saw their story as a spiritual journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | Richard Abowitz
In a city that is usually impossible to shock, the savaging of Roy Horn on Oct. 3, 2003, onstage and in front of a live audience at the Mirage, created one of those rare moments where all locals can say where they were when they heard the news. Steve Wynn, who spent millions to have the theater at the Mirage customized for the "Siegfried & Roy" show, remembered his first reaction in an interview this week: "I could not believe one of Roy's cats attacked him."
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Re "When a Beast Bites Back," by Paul Brownfield (Oct. 9), about the accident involving magician Roy Horn: I do not believe the comparison to Phil Bronstein's Komodo dragon encounter is accurate. Roy was not mistaken for prey. The phrases "evidently mistook Roy for prey" and "experience the unthinkable... : sympathy for the magician who tempts death" imply that Roy had it coming. But this is entirely untrue. Roy loves those cats as his own children, respects them, learns from them.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jay Jones
The white tiger that gravely injured magician Roy Horn of Siegfried & Roy in what some called an attack and others said was an effort to save the performer's life has died. Mantecore, one of the big cats that shared the stage with Siegfried & Roy in thousands of shows at the Mirage in Las Vegas , died March 19 after a brief illness. He was 17. The tiger gained worldwide notoriety on Oct. 3, 2003, when he sank his teeth into Horn's neck and dragged him off the stage during a performance.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A 600-pound tiger that attacked Roy Horn of the Las Vegas act Siegfried & Roy is expected to be released from quarantine today, Clark County officials said. The 7-year-old white tiger was isolated for 10 days to ensure it didn't have rabies, county spokeswoman Stacey Welling said. The animal has been held inside the Mirage hotel-casino since the Oct. 3 attack that almost killed Horn. The 59-year-old illusionist remained in critical condition at a Las Vegas hospital.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
MGM Mirage's annual profit may be cut as much as 10 cents a share because the company closed its Siegfried & Roy show after magician Roy Horn was attacked by a tiger Friday, Deutsche Bank analyst Marc Falcone said. But the company's stock held up relatively well Monday: It eased 35 cents, or 1%, to $36.48 on the New York Stock Exchange. Horn, 59, was bitten in the neck by a 600-pound white tiger during a performance at the Mirage hotel and casino in Las Vegas.
NEWS
September 4, 2004
Siegfried & Roy -- Articles in various sections of The Times have been in conflict about the weight of the tiger that mauled illusionist Roy Horn on Oct. 3. Times reports have given its weight as 300, 550 and 600 pounds. Siegfried & Roy's publicist and Las Vegas animal control officials said the tiger weighed about 380 pounds.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2003 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
At $110.50 per ticket, Siegfried & Roy were neither the hottest act on the Strip nor the most economical. And yet, such was their iconic status that people kept paying to see their shows at the Mirage hotel and casino, even as the explosion of Cirque du Soleil spectaculars cut into business and made their tigers and magic act all the more dated. There was simply no better way to mint one's Las Vegas experience than to say you had seen Siegfried & Roy.
SPORTS
October 23, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
The man in the mug shot has long hair, a stubbly beard. On the evening of Sept. 21, police say, he drove past the Las Vegas home of entertainers Siegfried & Roy, yelled, "We need to get these ... out of our country," then fired two shotgun blasts. Minutes later, he allegedly returned and opened fire again, blowing a large hole in the front of the residence. The man police say perpetrated these incidents, Cole Ford, who had dropped out of sight five years earlier, quickly went back into hiding.
NEWS
September 4, 2004
Siegfried & Roy -- Articles in various sections of The Times have been in conflict about the weight of the tiger that mauled illusionist Roy Horn on Oct. 3. Times reports have given its weight as 300, 550 and 600 pounds. Siegfried & Roy's publicist and Las Vegas animal control officials said the tiger weighed about 380 pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
NBC has been promoting the new sitcom "Joey" so heavily I'm beginning to wonder if Joey's got a swift boat in his past. The "Friends" spinoff has long been considered NBC's greatest hope for a new hit sitcom, except then I heard that the network of Donald Trump and "Fear Factor" was doing a cartoon based on the Las Vegas institution Siegfried & Roy. I perked up: Finally, a show about real Americans. And so at 9 tonight NBC trots out "Father of the Pride."
NATIONAL
August 26, 2004 | From Associated Press
The company that produced the Siegfried and Roy magic show said Wednesday that it would not give federal investigators the video of a tiger attack on illusionist Roy Horn to protect the performer's privacy. Feld Entertainment Inc. also said it had offered on several occasions to show video footage of the Oct. 3 attack to the U.S. Department of Agriculture but the agency had not accepted the invitation.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Re "When a Beast Bites Back," by Paul Brownfield (Oct. 9), about the accident involving magician Roy Horn: I do not believe the comparison to Phil Bronstein's Komodo dragon encounter is accurate. Roy was not mistaken for prey. The phrases "evidently mistook Roy for prey" and "experience the unthinkable... : sympathy for the magician who tempts death" imply that Roy had it coming. But this is entirely untrue. Roy loves those cats as his own children, respects them, learns from them.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A 600-pound tiger that nearly killed Roy Horn of the Las Vegas act of Siegfried & Roy has been released from quarantine, Clark County officials said. The 7-year-old white tiger named Montecore was isolated for 10 days to ensure it didn't have rabies, county spokeswoman Stacey Welling said. The animal had been held in isolation at the Mirage hotel-casino since the Oct. 3 attack. The 59-year-old illusionist remained in critical condition.
OPINION
October 13, 2003
"The Tragedy of Wild Animals in Captivity" (letter, Oct. 8) insinuated that Siegfried & Roy's use of big cats in their show "for profit" justified the injury Roy Horn sustained during their performance. Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn, primarily Roy, have single-handedly revived the royal white tiger and white lion. They have spent years working with zoos and organizations worldwide to conserve the species. To classify them in the same category as circus-like acts is doing them a terrible injustice.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
NBC has been promoting the new sitcom "Joey" so heavily I'm beginning to wonder if Joey's got a swift boat in his past. The "Friends" spinoff has long been considered NBC's greatest hope for a new hit sitcom, except then I heard that the network of Donald Trump and "Fear Factor" was doing a cartoon based on the Las Vegas institution Siegfried & Roy. I perked up: Finally, a show about real Americans. And so at 9 tonight NBC trots out "Father of the Pride."
NATIONAL
October 14, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A 600-pound tiger that attacked Roy Horn of the Las Vegas act Siegfried & Roy is expected to be released from quarantine today, Clark County officials said. The 7-year-old white tiger was isolated for 10 days to ensure it didn't have rabies, county spokeswoman Stacey Welling said. The animal has been held inside the Mirage hotel-casino since the Oct. 3 attack that almost killed Horn. The 59-year-old illusionist remained in critical condition at a Las Vegas hospital.
OPINION
October 13, 2003
"The Tragedy of Wild Animals in Captivity" (letter, Oct. 8) insinuated that Siegfried & Roy's use of big cats in their show "for profit" justified the injury Roy Horn sustained during their performance. Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn, primarily Roy, have single-handedly revived the royal white tiger and white lion. They have spent years working with zoos and organizations worldwide to conserve the species. To classify them in the same category as circus-like acts is doing them a terrible injustice.
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