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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
Los Angeles may be one of the first global cities to adopt a new electric freight trucking system, unveiled by electrical engineering giant Siemens Corp. last week at the 26th Electric Vehicle Symposium, or EVS26. The new technology, called eHighway, is a highway electrification system that uses overhead electrical wires to transmit energy to freight trucks in select vehicle lanes, similar to modern-day streetcars. “Most people think about cars when they think of vehicle emissions, but the reality is it's freight trucks,” said Daryl Dulaney, chief executive of North American infrastructure and cities sector for Siemens.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 2013 | By Catherine Green
Amid reports of wind turbine blades flying off and a resulting flurry of damage control measures, engineering powerhouse Siemens said Monday the chief of its wind power division would step down, two weeks after announcing costs related to incidents in California and Iowa. In a news release, Siemens said Felix Ferlemann, 53, was leaving “by mutual agreement to pursue new career challenges.” Markus Tacke, who had been serving as chief executive of the industrial power business unit within Siemens' energy division, will replace Ferlemann, who became chief executive in October 2011.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | Associated Press
German electronics maker Siemens plans to restructure its U.S. operations and build sales in the company's biggest overseas market before its slated March listing on the NYSE. The news prompted Siemens shares to jump $12.50 to close at $119 in over-the-counter trading. It plans to consolidate back-office operations such as accounting and personnel management to cut costs and bundle products from its 30 U.S. subsidiaries. Sales in the United States totaled $14.
OPINION
June 2, 2012
Re "A lost opportunity for job creation," Opinion, May 29 The L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's rail car contract award represents a historic first for federally funded rail car projects. It provides an opportunity to leverage capital projects to get Americans back to work, including L.A. residents. However, statements made by Madeline Janis in her Op-Ed article do not reflect the benefits of this contract. The contract award to Kinkisharyo will create 348 jobs in the United States.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2008
What's wrong with Siemens paying $1.4 billion in bribes to government officials? Answer: Uncle Sam didn't get his cut. ("Siemens to pay fines in criminal probe," Dec. 16.) So the Securities and Exchange Commission enforced an $800-million slice of the pie. Not a bribe, please; it's a "settlement." And for that, the U.S. calls everything an "accounting violation," and Siemens gets to stay in the government contracts game. With corruption, it seems that the difference between America and the rest of the world is that we have better paperwork and more ingenious PR spin.
NEWS
June 7, 1989
West Germany scrapped plans for a costly nuclear power plant, and two firms in Munich said they will build a solar-cell factory on the site. The decision not to build the controversial facility at Wackersdorf, in Bavaria, had been expected, since utilities had backed out of it for cost reasons. Siemens, an electronics company, and Bayernwerk, a utility firm, said they will invest $50 million in the solar-cell facility, which will employ about 400 people and produce 20 megawatts of power annually, beginning in the early 1990s.
OPINION
June 2, 2012
Re "A lost opportunity for job creation," Opinion, May 29 The L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's rail car contract award represents a historic first for federally funded rail car projects. It provides an opportunity to leverage capital projects to get Americans back to work, including L.A. residents. However, statements made by Madeline Janis in her Op-Ed article do not reflect the benefits of this contract. The contract award to Kinkisharyo will create 348 jobs in the United States.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
An exhibit booth--just the booth, not the people--was once taken hostage by a New York trucking company in a dispute with an air freight firm over an unpaid bill. The kidnaping stunt worked. The panicked company that owned the booth scurried to scrape together something--anything--else for the trade show that was about to open in Washington. Meanwhile, it pleaded for a settlement and, barely in time, the deal was made and the booth set free.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Siemens, Germany's biggest engineering and electronics company, trimmed its forecast for sales and earnings this fiscal year as demand for mobile phones and semiconductors weakens. Sales will rise more than 10% in the year through September, Siemens said, when its chip-making unit, Infineon Technologies, is excluded. Siemens previously forecast sales would increase by that amount including Infineon. Siemens and rivals Ericsson and Motorola Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
Los Angeles may be one of the first global cities to adopt a new electric freight trucking system, unveiled by electrical engineering giant Siemens Corp. last week at the 26th Electric Vehicle Symposium, or EVS26. The new technology, called eHighway, is a highway electrification system that uses overhead electrical wires to transmit energy to freight trucks in select vehicle lanes, similar to modern-day streetcars. “Most people think about cars when they think of vehicle emissions, but the reality is it's freight trucks,” said Daryl Dulaney, chief executive of North American infrastructure and cities sector for Siemens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2011 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
They researched how protons transfer within DNA. They argued for alternative energy sources. They studied breast cancer and considered how to make its treatment more effective. And they haven't even graduated from high school yet. Saturday in Pasadena, a sharp group of local students competed in the Super Bowl of science, vying for thousands of dollars in prize money and recognition for their research. David Cheng of Calabasas, Manoj Kanagaraj of Chino Hills, Daniel Chiou of Hacienda Heights and Barry Chen of Walnut were four of the 15 teenagers who spent the day at CalTech, getting peppered by professors about their work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Over here, it was a battle of brains. Over there, it looked like a contest of dexterity. Both qualities were in play Saturday in Pasadena as a group of young people competed at Caltech for science scholarships totaling $9,000 ? and others competed for certificates and plastic Rubik's Cubes worth $10 each. In the hushed silence of Ramo Auditorium, high school science students in suits and ties explained their research on such matters as nanoparticles and cell fusion to a panel of 10 Caltech professors serving as judges in the annual Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2010 | Wailin Wong
Motorola Inc. is selling its wireless networks unit to Nokia Siemens Networks for $1.2 billion in cash, a move that will accelerate the Schaumburg, Ill., company's planned breakup into separate businesses. The deal, announced Monday and expected to close at the end of 2010, will boost Nokia Siemens' standing in key markets such as the U.S. and Japan, while enabling Motorola to devote more attention to its enterprise mobility unit, which makes communications equipment for public safety agencies and industrial companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2009 | Dan Weikel
Officials for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority said Friday that they were concerned about the Iranian business connections of Siemens Corp., a potential contender for lucrative contracts to build light rail and subway cars for the agency. Siemens, which owns Siemens Transportation Systems Inc., partnered with Nokia last year to provide TCI, Iran's telecommunications company, the technology to monitor voice calls on the country's fixed and mobile telephone networks.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2008
What's wrong with Siemens paying $1.4 billion in bribes to government officials? Answer: Uncle Sam didn't get his cut. ("Siemens to pay fines in criminal probe," Dec. 16.) So the Securities and Exchange Commission enforced an $800-million slice of the pie. Not a bribe, please; it's a "settlement." And for that, the U.S. calls everything an "accounting violation," and Siemens gets to stay in the government contracts game. With corruption, it seems that the difference between America and the rest of the world is that we have better paperwork and more ingenious PR spin.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1992 | JACK SEARLES
Officials of Siemens Solar Industries in Camarillo are attending this month's Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro with a goal of expanding the company's market for solar energy-related business in developing countries. "The potential is huge," said William Howley, Siemens Solar's chief of staff. "There are 2 billion people in the world who have no access to electricity. In many cases, solar energy is the answer to the problem." Howley is in Rio along with Siemens Solar's president, Charles F. Gay.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Siemens, Europe's No. 3 phone equipment maker, agreed to buy two Internet equipment companies and took a stake in a third as part of a $1-billion investment to strengthen its data-networking business. The company bought Argon Networks Inc. and Castle Networks Inc., both closely held, for an undisclosed amount and will take a stake in Moorpark-based Accelerated Networks Inc. The purchases will be folded into Unisphere Solutions Inc., an independent U.S.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Meyer is a Times staff writer.
German industrial giant Siemens agreed Monday to pay a record $800 million to settle U.S. criminal charges stemming from what federal authorities say was a systemic campaign of bribing foreign officials for lucrative contracts. The Munich company also agreed to pay about $540 million to settle similar charges in Germany, which started the investigation in 2006. Both U.S.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2008 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Gores Group, a private equity firm headed by Los Angeles billionaire Alec Gores, will acquire a 51% stake in Siemens Enterprise Communications, a division of Germany's electronics giant Siemens with annual revenue of $5.5 billion, the companies said Tuesday. Terms were undisclosed. Siemens would keep 49% of the networking and communications company, which would be a joint venture operated by Gores Group.
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