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BUSINESS
February 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hewlett-Packard Co. agreed to buy the automotive design-tool business of Siemens Automotive, a unit of Germany's Siemens, for an undisclosed amount. The tools are used to design, calibrate and test the electronic controls used in automobile engines and transmissions. The companies said Palo Alto-based Hewlett-Packard will take over the business in phases over the next 18 months.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 2004
* Eastman Kodak Co. is selling its remote-sensing-systems unit to ITT Industries Inc. for $725 million. The deal is aimed at strengthening ITT's presence in the $6-billion remote-sensing market, which includes devices used in space exploration and spy equipment. * The German corporation Siemens VDO Automotive said it had agreed to buy two electronics plants in Alabama from DaimlerChrysler. Terms were not disclosed. * General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Group's new chairman and chief executive, Bob Nardelli, plans to keep the automaker's three brands but might cut some products as he leads the company through a restructuring. "Clearly Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep are all very, very valuable brands," Nardelli said after a speech to the Automotive Press Assn. "I think we have to look very hard at some of the products within those brands."
BUSINESS
February 22, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They will make it possible to analyze a blood sample in an instant, or warn a driver if he is on a collision course with another car, or adjust the tempo of a heart pacemaker. They might help coffee connoisseurs steam a better froth of milk for their lattes or tell skiers how many vertical feet they covered in a run. They are micromachines, devices so tiny they fit on a fingertip but pack the power of much larger machines.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driving with his three children just a few blocks from his Baltimore home last October, Robert Sanders leaned forward to change the radio station. Briefly distracted, he didn't see the red light until it was too late. He slammed on the brakes and skidded into another vehicle. The crash wasn't severe--Sanders said he was only moving about 10 mph at impact--but it was enough to set off the air bags in the 1995 Dodge Caravan. Sanders and his two sons, who were seated in the rear, were unhurt.
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