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TRAVEL
August 7, 2005
JANICE TESTA of Newport Coast was on a school alumni trip to Italy in April when she spotted some surprising laundry. "You look up that whole hillside and you see nothing but gorgeous medieval houses all the way up to the Duomo. And there, out the window, were these red stockings, and they all looked like long johns." She took the picture with her HP Photosmart 735. There had been a pageant in Siena a few days before, so Testa speculates that they were part of some costumes.
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TRAVEL
August 7, 2005
JANICE TESTA of Newport Coast was on a school alumni trip to Italy in April when she spotted some surprising laundry. "You look up that whole hillside and you see nothing but gorgeous medieval houses all the way up to the Duomo. And there, out the window, were these red stockings, and they all looked like long johns." She took the picture with her HP Photosmart 735. There had been a pageant in Siena a few days before, so Testa speculates that they were part of some costumes.
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TRAVEL
June 14, 1992 | FREDELL POGODIN, Pogodin is a publicist specializing in foreign and independent films who travels frequently to Italy
In passionate, vociferous Italy, nothing is ever simple--not even a horse race. Those who flock to Siena each summer to witness the magnificent, medieval tradition known as the Palio know all too well the complexities behind the veil of ritual. While naive first-timers might take the race for an innocuous display of pageantry and equestrian competition, it represents, in fact, a behind-the-scenes rivalry between neighborhoods that's even more intense than the Super Bowl in America.
TRAVEL
June 14, 1992 | FREDELL POGODIN, Pogodin is a publicist specializing in foreign and independent films who travels frequently to Italy
In passionate, vociferous Italy, nothing is ever simple--not even a horse race. Those who flock to Siena each summer to witness the magnificent, medieval tradition known as the Palio know all too well the complexities behind the veil of ritual. While naive first-timers might take the race for an innocuous display of pageantry and equestrian competition, it represents, in fact, a behind-the-scenes rivalry between neighborhoods that's even more intense than the Super Bowl in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Wolf Winners: Violinist Yehudi Menuhin and composer-conductor Luciano Berio were named Wednesday as winners of Israel's Wolf Prizes in the arts for 1991. The awards, which carry $100,000 grants, will be presented in May at the Israeli Knesset. Menuhin, 74, who lives in London, has founded his own chamber orchestra, directs the Gstaad Festival in Switzerland and is president of the Trinity College of Music. Berio, 65, of Siena, Italy, is noted for innovations in electronic music.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers have discovered how the bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes ulcers, and it is not what they expected. A team from Stanford University and the IRIS research institute in Siena, Italy, reported in Friday's issue of Science that the bacterium binds to the junctions between cells in the intestinal lining, injecting a protein that loosens the binding between cells. That causes leakiness of the lining, allowing stomach acids to irritate underlying tissue and produce ulcers.
TRAVEL
November 27, 1994 | HANK KOVELL
Combine travel with learning a foreign language. Language Study Abroad arranges study courses in Mexico and Europe. Prices quoted for those over 50 include registration, accommodations, most meals and tuition. Classes are held five days a week for two weeks; air fare not included: * Cuernavaca, Mexico: $708. A 90-minute drive from Mexico City. * Ensenada, Baja California: $600. A discount is available for those who want to live in their RV. * Vichy, France: $831.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | Associated Press
Twelve European universities Friday signed a cooperation agreement with six Palestinian universities in Israeli-occupied territories, calling it a step in line with the Madrid peace conference. Luigi Berlinguer, rector of the University of Siena in Italy, said, "To make Palestinian and European universities closer to each other . . . means to recognize the Palestinian entity."
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | Associated Press
A vaccine can protect against the bacteria thought to cause stomach ulcers and some stomach cancers, Italian researchers have shown in a laboratory experiment with mice. The study, to be published today in the journal Science, showed that more than 70% of immunized mice were protected against a strain of Helicobacter pylori, the ulcer-causing bacteria. "The finding suggests that vaccines against H.
SPORTS
May 17, 1992 | KEVIN BAXTER
Noureddine Morceli is not the only Olympic contender monitoring Algeria's unstable political situation. Hassiba Boulmerka, winner of the women's 1,500 meters in last year's World Championships, might be more affected by the outcome. Despite her surprising victory, Boulmerka's participation at the World Championships in Tokyo drew the ire of Islamic fundamentalists in Algeria.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The documentary "The Human Scale" explores and celebrates the successful pedestrianization of various cities around the globe, particularly those that have been modified under the visionary eye of Danish architect and urban planner Jan Gehl. However, writer-director Andreas M. Dalsgaard takes such a low-key approach to presenting the film's vital, potentially involving topic that viewers may find themselves more inspired to take a snooze than a stroll. Dalsgaard, who also provides the movie's quiet, clipped-voiced narration, travels to such far-flung spots as Chongqing, China; Siena, Italy; Melbourne, Australia; Christchurch, New Zealand; Dhaka, Bangladesh (the world's fastest-growing city)
BUSINESS
July 21, 2005 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The outlook for Chiron Corp.'s flu vaccine business worsened Wednesday when the company said it would ship no vaccine from a troubled German factory. The announcement came five days after Chiron slashed production at the Marburg plant after finding bacteria in some vaccine. On Wall Street, the latest round of bad news fueled uncertainty about Chiron's ability to supply vaccine to the United States.
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