Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSierra Club
IN THE NEWS

Sierra Club

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1989
Sierra Club mountaineers should direct their frustration not at the club leadership, but at lawyers who, whenever there is insurance or an organization with "deep pockets," generate multimillion-dollar lawsuits, and against juries which award "free money" in ever-increasing amounts ("Ban on Mountaineering Causes Rift in Sierra Club," Part I, Feb. 17). The mountaineers should work for a waiver law that would protect nonprofit organizations from liability, and if this fails, which is likely given the lawyers' stranglehold on Sacramento, for a separate club with fees high enough to pay for lawyers' Rolls Royces and $500 lunch bills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 17, 2014
Re “Solar power's outlook not as sunny,” Jan. 12 The article shows that the desert may not be the best place after all to generate solar power. As The Times points out, the move is away from large, industrial-scale desert plants and toward urban-based, mid-sized ones and rooftop solar: so-called distributed generation. Urban solar built over parking lots and on rooftops eliminates the environmental damage of desert solar - along with the need for environment impact statements, new transmission lines to bring the power to the cities and the costly lawsuits brought against desert plants.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
The Sierra Club's Angeles Chapter is leading an active adventure -- expect to walk or hike three to five miles a day -- in Israel that includes snorkeling among the coral reefs of the Red Sea, floating in the Dead Sea, bird watching in the Hula Nature Reserve and hiking up Masada, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Also included are walking tours of the Old City of Jerusalem, Caesarea and Jaffa, the oldest port town in the world. In Jerusalem, the group will walk and learn about the places that are sacred to all three major religions as well as learn about other unique people in Israel, such as the Bedouin, the Druze and the Bahais.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- A majority of electricity consumers in Orange and San Diego counties would prefer that energy needed to replace the output of the shuttered San Onofre nuclear power plant come from renewable, non-polluting sources, according to a new poll. The survey, conducted by Public Policy Polling of Raleigh, N.C., for the Sierra Club, concludes that 56% of ratepayers in the two counties want new power to come from wind, solar and other sources that do not rely on fossil fuel. Photos: Top 10 Southern California companies About 4 in 5 customers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. said it was very important that San Onofre's 2,200 megawatts of output not be replaced by new power plants that contribute to air pollution.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Environmental and liberal activist groups are split over a pending pioneering bill that would regulate the controversial oil-extraction technique known as fracking. Legislation by Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills) would, for the first time in the nation, require oil companies to disclose details of the chemicals, locations and procedures involved with hydraulic fracturing and related "well-stimulation" activities. The bill also would require that well sites be permitted and that the state conduct a scientific study of hydraulic fracturing, among other things.
AUTOS
June 19, 2013 | By Catherine Green
Chevrolet's Volt topped the Sierra Club's list of plug-in hybrids in the environmental organization's annual Electric Vehicle Guide . At a price falling mid-range in the list of six EVs reviewed, the Volt takes drivers 38 electric-only miles before its gasoline engine kicks in. That results in a miles per gallon equivalent (mpge) of 98 on the Environmental Protection Agency's scale. In total, Volt owners get a range of 380 miles at an annual fuel cost of $950. (The estimate uses average $0.12 per kilowatt-hour and $3.61 for regular gas - quite a bit lower than the typical cost of gasoline in California.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The chairman of the Sierra Club, one of the nation's most influential environmental groups, has stepped down amid discontent that the group founded by 19th century wilderness evangelist John Muir has strayed from its core principles. The departure of Carl Pope, 66, a member of the club for more than 40 years, comes as the nonprofit group faces declining membership, internal dissent, well-organized opponents, a weak economy and forces in Congress trying to take the teeth out of environmental regulations.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
As an environmentalist, Michael Brune made a name for himself by spearheading an unrelenting and ultimately successful campaign to pressure Home Depot into phasing out sales of lumber from endangered rain forests. Now, Brune is taking the reins of the Sierra Club at a time when much of the movement has turned away from confrontational tactics in favor of compromise, especially on the push for sweeping new federal legislation on climate change. Brune, who took on Home Depot while heading the Rainforest Action Network, recently discussed his approach to the climate change issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
The Sierra Club, the nation's largest and oldest environmental advocacy group, has named Michael Brune its next executive director. A longtime environmental organizer who has headed the Rainforest Action Network for the last seven years, Brune will succeed Carl Pope in March. Pope, the organization's executive director since 1992, will stay on as executive chairman and devote himself to climate change issues. Brune is moving from a small, feisty group known for its attention-getting stunts to a pillar of the mainstream environmental movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1997
Attacks from the far left or right are not new experiences for me, although seldom have I been treated to one as venomous, inaccurate or distorted as that of Alexander Cockburn (Column Left, Oct. 2). Virtually the only correct statement in the column was that I wrote "The Population Bomb" in 1968. Bald associations of pre-World War II eugenicists and Nazis with the Sierra Club's current discussion will unquestionably fan the flames of hysteria already surrounding the issue of immigration and force rational discussion further off the agenda.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
The Sierra Club's Angeles Chapter is leading an active adventure -- expect to walk or hike three to five miles a day -- in Israel that includes snorkeling among the coral reefs of the Red Sea, floating in the Dead Sea, bird watching in the Hula Nature Reserve and hiking up Masada, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Also included are walking tours of the Old City of Jerusalem, Caesarea and Jaffa, the oldest port town in the world. In Jerusalem, the group will walk and learn about the places that are sacred to all three major religions as well as learn about other unique people in Israel, such as the Bedouin, the Druze and the Bahais.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
About 3 million barrels of crude are being loaded into the southern section of the Keystone XL pipeline as operators prepare to start operations next month, even as environmental critics continue to assail the safety of the project and lament legal setbacks that allowed the project to move forward. TransCanada, the Alberta-based pipeline company, announced Tuesday that it would begin shipping oil on Jan. 22 on its Gulf Coast project, a 485-mile pipeline that forms the southern section of the XL from Cushing, Okla., to Texas.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The quadrennial AFL-CIO convention kicks off in Los Angeles on Sunday with the aim to coalesce unions and progressive groups who are here to strategize ways to reinvigorate the flailing labor movement. With about 5,000 attendees expected to attend the gathering, labor leaders and others have prepared an agenda covering a variety of issues and resolutions that include immigration reform, voting rights, racial justice and the Affordable Care Act. The convention has brought together new allies to the labor movement who are hammering out a workable plan to combine the memberships of unions and groups that include the Sierra Club, the NAACP and the National Council of La Raza.  Quiz: How well do you know California's economy?
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Ricardo Lopez
Conservatives have coalesced behind tea party themes of reducing spending and cutting the federal deficit, creating a political powerhouse that has championed those causes on Capitol Hill. Now, the nation's largest affiliation of unions is trying to create a political alliance to more effectively counter the right's successes. As it kicks off its convention in Los Angeles this weekend, the 12-million-member AFL-CIO says it is aligning itself with progressive groups such as the NAACP, the Sierra Club and the National Council of La Raza to strengthen the left's political power.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A coalition of over 100 environmental and populist groups is denouncing fracking legislation as too weak and calling on Gov. Jerry Brown to order an immediate halt to the controversial drilling practice. "The truth is that there is no proven way to protect California from fracking besides prohibiting this inherently dangerous practice," said the letter to be delivered to the governor's office Wednesday. Pending legislation - SB 4 by Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills)
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Environmental and liberal activist groups are split over a pending pioneering bill that would regulate the controversial oil-extraction technique known as fracking. Legislation by Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills) would, for the first time in the nation, require oil companies to disclose details of the chemicals, locations and procedures involved with hydraulic fracturing and related "well-stimulation" activities. The bill also would require that well sites be permitted and that the state conduct a scientific study of hydraulic fracturing, among other things.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Anthony York
INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. - As political leaders from California and Nevada gathered on the eastern shore of Lake Tahoe to discuss ways to protect it, environmentalists protested that a bill in California could reverse nearly two decades of environmental improvements. The measure before the Legislature would codify an agreement reached last year between the two states' leaders to limit the powers of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, which sets environmental rules for development on both the California and Nevada sides of the lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
MARTINEZ, Calif. - It would be hard to equal John Muir's love for the giant sequoia, a majestic California native that can live 3,000 years and soar 250 feet high. "The King tree & me have sworn eternal love," he wrote to a friend in the fall of 1870, "sworn it without swearing and Ive taken the sacrament with Douglass Squirrels drank Sequoia wine, Sequoia blood, & with its rosy purple drips I am writing this woody gospel letter. " A decade or so later, the besotted conservationist returned from a Sierra Nevada jaunt with a seedling wrapped in a damp handkerchief.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|