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October 14, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most folks who know Richard Martin know him as an insurance salesman. That's what he's been since the '50s, and that's what it says on his business card: Richard Martin Associates, estate planning and business insurance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most folks who know Richard Martin know him as an insurance salesman. That's what he's been since the '50s, and that's what it says on his business card: Richard Martin Associates, estate planning and business insurance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The car Grace Boyd was riding in headed up a narrow canyon that cuts through brown hills just west of this tiny town on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada. "Now this looks familiar," said Boyd, the widow of William (Hopalong Cassidy) Boyd, as the huge boulders and spectacular rock outcroppings of the Alabama Hills came into view. Familiar indeed. Since 1920, when Fatty Arbuckle filmed a comedy Western here called "The Round-Up," the rocky hills below Mt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The car Grace Boyd was riding in headed up a narrow canyon that cuts through brown hills just west of this tiny town on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada. "Now this looks familiar," said Boyd, the widow of William (Hopalong Cassidy) Boyd, as the huge boulders and spectacular rock outcroppings of the Alabama Hills came into view. Familiar indeed. Since 1920, when Fatty Arbuckle filmed a comedy Western here called "The Round-Up," the rocky hills below Mt.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1991
The second annual Lone Pine Sierra Film Festival, probably the most tightly focused in the world, is scheduled this year from Oct. 11-13 in the Sierra foothill city. It will show only films shot amid the scenic Alabama Rocks just outside town and will honor only movie folk who made them there.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony celebrating 70 years of filmmaking in the rugged Alabama Hills completed, the white-haired gentleman in the black cowboy hat and fancy Western duds tramped over the sagebrush-dotted landscape to have his picture taken. "That was quite a thing," said former B-Western movie badman Pierce Lyden of Orange, a featured guest at the first Sierra Film Festival, held last weekend in this tiny town in the shadow of Mt. Whitney on the eastern side of the Sierra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Richard Martin, an insurance broker who as a young man played the comic cowboy Chito Rafferty in more than 30 Western serial films for RKO, died Sunday of complications from leukemia at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian. He was 75. Martin, of Balboa Island, started his show business career as a receptionist for MGM making $17.76 a week. His goal was to be a makeup man, but his acting career began after one of his friends, on a lark, bet an agent that he couldn't get Martin an acting contract.
TRAVEL
July 22, 1990 | Compiled from staff and news service reports .
The California town of Lone Pine, 200 miles northeast of Los Angeles, will celebrate its legendary movie past with a two-day Movie Festival and Arts Celebration, Oct. 6-7. Film crews have come to Lone Pine over the years to make everything from Tom Mix and Hoot Gibson silents and Gene Autry and Hopalong Cassidy Westerns to major features such as "Gunga Din," "How the West Was Won" and "Star Trek V."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1991
The second annual Lone Pine Sierra Film Festival, probably the most tightly focused in the world, is scheduled this year from Oct. 11-13 in the Sierra foothill city. It will show only films shot amid the scenic Alabama Rocks just outside town and will honor only movie folk who made them there.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony celebrating 70 years of filmmaking in the rugged Alabama Hills completed, the white-haired gentleman in the black cowboy hat and fancy Western duds tramped over the sagebrush-dotted landscape to have his picture taken. "That was quite a thing," said former B-Western movie badman Pierce Lyden of Orange, a featured guest at the first Sierra Film Festival, held last weekend in this tiny town in the shadow of Mt. Whitney on the eastern side of the Sierra.
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