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Sierra Leone Health

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1999 | ROB O'NEIL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy for Margaret Mortimore to find herself flashing back a decade to her days in the West African republic of Sierra Leone. First there are the pictures in her Montrose apartment and her office at Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, where she works as a clinical instructor and physical therapist. And then there is the dubious news coming from a country that, even before its civil war, was at the bottom of U.N. rankings in literacy, infant mortality and life expectancy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1999 | ROB O'NEIL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy for Margaret Mortimore to find herself flashing back a decade to her days in the West African republic of Sierra Leone. First there are the pictures in her Montrose apartment and her office at Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, where she works as a clinical instructor and physical therapist. And then there is the dubious news coming from a country that, even before its civil war, was at the bottom of U.N. rankings in literacy, infant mortality and life expectancy.
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WORLD
November 15, 2009
For centuries, colonial powers exploited the west coast of Africa. Today, the region's governments are feeble and living conditions are among the world's worst, despite billions of dollars in foreign aid. The situation poses both a local and a global threat. Today: Sierra Leone's public health system is barely alive. Next: Guinea-Bissau, a hub for cocaine trafficking. Full coverage: latimes.com /africa
WORLD
November 16, 2009 | Scott Kraft
As a senior police official, Edmundo Mendes' job is to arrest the South American cocaine traffickers who use his troubled West African country, with its starry array of remote islands, as a transit point for drug shipments bound for Europe. It hasn't been easy. To demonstrate, Mendes walked a few steps from his office into the gritty mix of smoke and car exhaust in downtown Bissau. He fished a ring of keys from his pocket and made quick work of a rusty padlock. The metal door groaned open to a small courtyard.
WORLD
November 15, 2009 | Scott Kraft
When the power went out that night, Dr. Ibrahim Thorlie was operating on his fifth patient of the day in a maternity hospital with a shortage of antibiotics and running water. His colleague was doing an emergency caesarean in the next room. In the corridor, a bucket on the floor held a stillborn baby. Thorlie turned wordlessly in the darkened room and lifted his gloved hands. Sweat beaded up on his forehead like dewdrops. A nurse reached into the surgeon's pocket and pulled out his penlight, a pas de deux they had clearly performed many times before.
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