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June 29, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stock traders dove under tables, aerospace workers fled their offices and hotel maids were sent home in the wake of the largest earthquake to hit Los Angeles in the past 20 years. The quake, which measured a magnitude of 6.0, forced the evacuation of businesses from Pasadena to Huntington Beach and caused banks and shopping malls to close for the day. Merchants who peddle earthquake kits reported increased sales.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2010 | By Robert J. Lopez
A cold storm belted Southern California with rain and snow Tuesday, flooding streets and leaving residents in foothill neighborhoods wondering whether saturated hillsides would withstand the latest onslaught of wet weather. In Sierra Madre, officials ordered mandatory evacuations Tuesday afternoon for about 300 homes in the city's canyon areas, but allowed residents to return in the evening. The alert followed a similar order issued for more than 500 homes Monday night in burn areas in La CaƱada Flintridge, La Crescenta and Acton.
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NEWS
June 29, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The earthquake that jolted Southern California on Friday morning boosted the San Gabriel Mountains up a couple of inches and demonstrated once again just how some areas of the Los Angeles Basin are more vulnerable to quakes than others. In general, people closest to the quake felt it the most. Even at considerable distances, the quake caused extensive shaking because of variations in geology throughout the basin.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | Pete Thomas
Repairs have closed a key road hikers and mountain bikers use to reach trails in the Chantry Flat area above Sierra Madre. Officials say the closure will last until June 18, but the various agencies involved in the work are sending mixed signals. Meanwhile, recreational users are getting anxious as summer season arrives. Kim Clymer-Kelley, owner of the concession at Chantry Flat in the Angeles National Forest, said users are staying away because of the confusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No two houses are the same--decades-old cabins perch next-door to modern three-bedroom homes. No two yards are alike--some fenced, manicured and green, others pockmarked with rocks, littered with fallen leaves and overgrown with dense foliage. This is Sierra Madre Canyon, a place so well known in San Gabriel Valley lore that it's commonly referred to simply as "the canyon." It's a community known for its laid-back and close-knit residents, its '60s hippie roots.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not that you don't get scared. Because you do. There is that initial jolt, the rumble and thump that makes one guy in Altadena think a low-rider with a supercharged stereo has just passed his house. As the bass notes surge, you begin to realize that this is something far bigger, something like a roller coaster reaching its peak and, wheels creaking, starting its downward plunge: Hold your breath and wait it out.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | Pete Thomas
Repairs have closed a key road hikers and mountain bikers use to reach trails in the Chantry Flat area above Sierra Madre. Officials say the closure will last until June 18, but the various agencies involved in the work are sending mixed signals. Meanwhile, recreational users are getting anxious as summer season arrives. Kim Clymer-Kelley, owner of the concession at Chantry Flat in the Angeles National Forest, said users are staying away because of the confusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 12 years, Jeff Mills has worked on the float. "I just really enjoy the people," he said. For 16 years, William "Spence" Spencer has made the trip back, driving down each December from his home in Northern California, just to work on the float. His years, and skill at decorating, have earned him an affectionate nickname: the Flower God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1997
A state political watchdog commission has ruled that there is no evidence to show a former member of the Sierra Madre Tree Preservation Commission had a conflict of interest when he went to work for a developer whose project he once inspected as a commission member. In a letter to former tree Commissioner Lew Watanabe, the Fair Political Practices Commission wrote that it would conduct no further investigation into a complaint filed Oct. 3 by attorney Linda Thornton.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rick Shaker and Jeff Troxell were getting ready to remove debris from the road, repair potholes or lay asphalt when the earthquake hit. They didn't feel the temblor, but it meant a big change in their job duties for the day. As always after a quake, they and other crews from the California Department of Transportation climbed into their bright-orange trucks and set off to assess the damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
He is 74 years old now and he can't march anymore. There are moments these days when John Grijalva can't even remember the time he served his country, his own wedding or the days his three children were born. But nobody was standing taller at last month's unveiling of a design for his brainchild: A proposed wall of "legacy etchings" to honor Sierra Madre veterans from the Civil War to the Gulf War to the present.
REAL ESTATE
December 22, 2002 | Anne Colby, Times Staff Writer
Picturesque Sierra Madre, at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains between Pasadena and Arcadia, was founded as a ranching community in 1881. It soon became a vacation destination as well, with hotels, sanitariums and resorts dotted among the citrus groves and vineyards. Today, historic homes and a village atmosphere give Sierra Madre a flavor of the past. Drawing card Residents prize the strong sense of community nurtured by many civic events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2002 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drone of a circling police helicopter woke many people in Sierra Madre in the black of a recent August night. Problem in nearby Pasadena, one man thought. Traffic accident, thought another. But darned if that noise didn't sound as if it were directly overhead. Must be a fire, thought Sierra Madre Mayor Doug Hayes. He pulled himself out of bed, stepped barefoot into his car and drove downtown toward the chopper's searchlights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No two houses are the same--decades-old cabins perch next-door to modern three-bedroom homes. No two yards are alike--some fenced, manicured and green, others pockmarked with rocks, littered with fallen leaves and overgrown with dense foliage. This is Sierra Madre Canyon, a place so well known in San Gabriel Valley lore that it's commonly referred to simply as "the canyon." It's a community known for its laid-back and close-knit residents, its '60s hippie roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1999 | JESSICA GARRISON and GEORGE RAMOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As fire rampaged Tuesday across the steep southern face of the San Gabriel Mountains, John Mayberry sat in a lounge chair on the back deck of his Arcadia home, sipping orange juice and watching a blaze that, hours before, had been stopped within a block or so of his property. The charred evidence of his remarkable good fortune lay before him as he watched firefighters, aided by calm weather, furiously attack the blaze, which authorities suspect was caused by arson or negligence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 92 years, the weekly Sierra Madre News chronicled the history of its namesake town, story by story, from 911 calls about barking dogs to the thrills and spills of the Great Crate Race. But there is one story this self-proclaimed "Voice of the Foothills" never told: the one about its own demise. The 50-cent newspaper, known to locals affectionately as "The Squeak," ceased publishing a few weeks ago without word or warning. Its green, old-fashioned news racks are empty. Its offices bolted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991 | VICKI TORRES and EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Caltech scientists on Monday downgraded the Sierra Madre earthquake to a magnitude 5.8, and Gov. Pete Wilson announced he would wait for survey team assessments before deciding whether to declare an emergency. After gathering more data from seismometers, Caltech and the Pasadena office of the U.S. Geological Survey reassessed Friday's 7:43 a.m. temblor, which had been estimated at 6.0. The risk of a major aftershock this week--one with a magnitude of 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1991
Gov. Wilson on Wednesday asked the federal government to offer low-interest loans to homeowners, businesses and tenants who suffered damage in the June 28 Sierra Madre earthquake. The loans, which would be made available through the U.S. Small Business Administration, would give each recipient up to $100,000 for house repairs, and up to $20,000 to replace or repair personal property, such as furniture. Interest payments would be either 4% or 8%, depending on what the applicant could afford.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tarnished brass horn resounded through the hills of Sierra Madre almost every day for 59 years, a tradition of the all-volunteer Fire Department that seemed to root this foothill town in its beloved past. When the horn was installed, one local said it sounded like a "600-horsepower bullfrog with a battery in its throat." Still, many residents found it comforting, an old friend shared by the community like the long-gone cannery whistles in Monterey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking over Sierra Madre's Rose Parade float, construction manager Chip Young smoked a cigarette and admired his work. It was Dec. 9, and most of the construction was done. The float, all metal and wood, would soon be covered with flowers and greenery. "I think someday we should have a parade without the flowers," he said. "I think you cover up the float's beauty with the flowers."
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