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Sierra Madre Ca Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Douglas and Donna Sutcliffe tried to put new shingles on their Craftsman home in Sierra Madre two years ago, history shackled their progress. The repair was delayed several weeks because their bungalow is listed on the city's register of historic landmarks--a designation made under an old city law that did not require the Sutcliffes' consent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a victory for preservationists, the California Supreme Court on Thursday barred cities from stripping buildings of historic-landmark status without environmental reviews. The court decided unanimously that Sierra Madre improperly removed 29 buildings from a list of historic properties through a 1998 city-sponsored ballot measure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996 | PETER NOAH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William White has been practicing medicine and listening to his patients' stories for 33 years in Sierra Madre. And he's worried that those stories, which tie yesterday's characters to today's tiny foothill town, are "disappearing as the people disappear." "There's such a wonderful history that we will lose unless we record it," he says. The best way to do it, White figures, is to save a place that seems to be home to so many tales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1918, springtime in Sierra Madre is time to celebrate an annual love affair with the lavender blossoms of a wisteria. So many flock to see the twining, woody vine that it has spawned a one-day festival, and tickets are required for a peek at what the Guinness Book of World Records in 1990 listed as the world's largest blossoming plant. This year's festival Sunday lured more than 10,000 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1992 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sierra Madre, epicenter of a magnitude 5.8 temblor that rocked Southern California last year, there is now quaking of a different kind. The tiny town faces a divisive debate over the fate of a picturesque monastery nestled in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, where the whitewashed bell tower has for decades stood like a beacon.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
BACKGROUND: Some laughed, others winced, when the glass pyramid house started going up in the Sierra Madre foothills in the 1970s. Since it was written about in View(April, 1991), the pyramid has been sold and survived the Sierra Madre quake (uncracked). UPDATE: Now, there's talk of making it a city landmark. Those favoring the idea include Roy Buchan, lifelong Sierra Madre resident and, until recently, its mayor. At first, he says, "I was afraid it was going to be kind of a screwball thing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a victory for preservationists, the California Supreme Court on Thursday barred cities from stripping buildings of historic-landmark status without environmental reviews. The court decided unanimously that Sierra Madre improperly removed 29 buildings from a list of historic properties through a 1998 city-sponsored ballot measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1918, springtime in Sierra Madre is time to celebrate an annual love affair with the lavender blossoms of a wisteria. So many flock to see the twining, woody vine that it has spawned a one-day festival, and tickets are required for a peek at what the Guinness Book of World Records in 1990 listed as the world's largest blossoming plant. This year's festival Sunday lured more than 10,000 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998
Activists alleged Thursday that a city mailing about a measure on the April ballot that proposes to drop historic designation for 29 properties was sent in violation of state election laws. Linda Thornton, a local attorney, said the mailing was hurriedly sent out Tuesday to the city's 7,500 registered voters after she informed the city in a letter that she would seek a restraining order to prevent its distribution. "No mass mailing can be sent at public expense," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998
Activists alleged Thursday that a city mailing about a measure on the April ballot that proposes to drop historic designation for 29 properties was sent in violation of state election laws. Linda Thornton, a local attorney, said the mailing was hurriedly sent out Tuesday to the city's 7,500 registered voters after she informed the city in a letter that she would seek a restraining order to prevent its distribution. "No mass mailing can be sent at public expense," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Douglas and Donna Sutcliffe tried to put new shingles on their Craftsman home in Sierra Madre two years ago, history shackled their progress. The repair was delayed several weeks because their bungalow is listed on the city's register of historic landmarks--a designation made under an old city law that did not require the Sutcliffes' consent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996 | PETER NOAH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William White has been practicing medicine and listening to his patients' stories for 33 years in Sierra Madre. And he's worried that those stories, which tie yesterday's characters to today's tiny foothill town, are "disappearing as the people disappear." "There's such a wonderful history that we will lose unless we record it," he says. The best way to do it, White figures, is to save a place that seems to be home to so many tales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1992 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sierra Madre, epicenter of a magnitude 5.8 temblor that rocked Southern California last year, there is now quaking of a different kind. The tiny town faces a divisive debate over the fate of a picturesque monastery nestled in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, where the whitewashed bell tower has for decades stood like a beacon.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
BACKGROUND: Some laughed, others winced, when the glass pyramid house started going up in the Sierra Madre foothills in the 1970s. Since it was written about in View(April, 1991), the pyramid has been sold and survived the Sierra Madre quake (uncracked). UPDATE: Now, there's talk of making it a city landmark. Those favoring the idea include Roy Buchan, lifelong Sierra Madre resident and, until recently, its mayor. At first, he says, "I was afraid it was going to be kind of a screwball thing.
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