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Sierra Madre Ca Zoning

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1991
Unable to resolve differences between two competing boundary lines for a new hillside management zone, the Sierra Madre City Council declined to vote and returned the matter to a task force for further adjustments this week. The Hillside Management Task Force has scheduled a public workshop to resolve the boundary problems this Saturday in City Hall. The disagreement arose when the Planning Commission voted 4 to 3 to establish the management zone boundary along property lines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas and Donna Sutcliffe wanted to re-shingle their roof. But because their 1906 California bungalow is on a list of historic homes in image-conscious Sierra Madre, that meant seeking approval from a review board. And that also meant, the Sutcliffes say, red tape and delay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1997 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was meant to be a routine update of the city of Sierra Madre's zoning code, a few plainly stated sentences defining the term "family" through such criteria as a shared kitchen, mailing address and front door. It was supposed to be the kind of talk aimed at preventing problems like illegal rental units being added to houses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a split vote, the Sierra Madre City Council approved changing the wording of a city zoning code to define a family as those related by "blood, marriage or adoption." About 100 people crowded into the tiny council chamber to hear more than a dozen speakers attack the proposal by Councilwoman MaryAnn MacGillivray, which terms those living together in all other relationships "housekeeping units." The vote was 3 to 2, with Councilman Doug Hayes and Mayor James Hester dissenting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas and Donna Sutcliffe wanted to re-shingle their roof. But because their 1906 California bungalow is on a list of historic homes in image-conscious Sierra Madre, that meant seeking approval from a review board. And that also meant, the Sutcliffes say, red tape and delay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a split vote, the Sierra Madre City Council approved changing the wording of a city zoning code to define a family as those related by "blood, marriage or adoption." About 100 people crowded into the tiny council chamber to hear more than a dozen speakers attack the proposal by Councilwoman MaryAnn MacGillivray, which terms those living together in all other relationships "housekeeping units." The vote was 3 to 2, with Councilman Doug Hayes and Mayor James Hester dissenting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1997 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was meant to be a routine update of the city of Sierra Madre's zoning code, a few plainly stated sentences defining the term "family" through such criteria as a shared kitchen, mailing address and front door. It was supposed to be the kind of talk aimed at preventing problems like illegal rental units being added to houses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1991
Unable to resolve differences between two competing boundary lines for a new hillside management zone, the Sierra Madre City Council declined to vote and returned the matter to a task force for further adjustments this week. The Hillside Management Task Force has scheduled a public workshop to resolve the boundary problems this Saturday in City Hall. The disagreement arose when the Planning Commission voted 4 to 3 to establish the management zone boundary along property lines.
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