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Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project

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NEWS
June 8, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The most comprehensive study ever made of the Sierra Nevada region on Friday recommended creating a system of forest reserves, restricting population growth and imposing stricter air quality controls to combat environmental threats degrading the range's natural splendor.
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NEWS
June 8, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The most comprehensive study ever made of the Sierra Nevada region on Friday recommended creating a system of forest reserves, restricting population growth and imposing stricter air quality controls to combat environmental threats degrading the range's natural splendor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1996
The Aug. 14 commentary by Bill Coates ("Nature Needs a Hand to Prevent Fires") was very misleading and painted far too rosy a picture of man's ability to prevent wildfire. Coates argues that extensive logging is necessary to reduce fire risk in California forests. Science disagrees. The recent Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project report, a comprehensive study of Sierra forest conditions, concluded that "timber harvest .J.J. has increased fire severity more than any other human activity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999
From Mt. Lassen in the north to Walker Pass in the south, the Sierra Nevada is arguably the nation's most spectacular and diverse mountain range. For 350 miles, the Sierra forms a great mountain wall that culminates in a granite-spired crest reaching to the 14,495-foot summit of Mt. Whitney. The range is spectacular and historic. The western foothills yielded gold.
OPINION
July 22, 2002
In a clumsy stroke of doublespeak, the Bush administration has at once embraced a landmark plan to protect the Sierra Nevada and launched a study that could undermine that very plan. It is easy to suspect that the results of the new study are ordained already. Nearly 10 years of work preceded the Clinton administration's adoption of the Sierra Nevada Framework, a management plan for 11.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Each year, scientists from across the United States and as far as Russia come to a small compound at the base of the Sierra's east slope. They come to study the psychology of ground squirrels, the population dynamics of brine shrimp, the characteristics of melting snow and other natural phenomena.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Clinton administration on Thursday formally rejected as environmentally unsound the U.S. Forest Service's long-term strategy for managing the 10 national forests in the Sierra Nevada. In a strongly worded report prepared by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost all of the thousands of lakes and ponds lying above 7,500 feet in the Sierra Nevada were fishless before settlers began stocking them with trout in the 1800s. After World War II, the California Department of Fish and Game began an intensive program of regularly stocking hatchery-raised trout in the waters, most of which today lie within the boundaries of U.S. Forest Service and National Park wilderness areas.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In this old railroad town high in the Sierra Nevada, the waitress at the Cafe Meridian asks if you want your sandwich on focaccia bread or a baguette. In the historic river valley where gold was discovered in 1848, a local rancher wants to build a 10,000-seat rock 'n' roll pavilion.
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