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NEWS
February 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
An avalanche in the Sierra Nevada mountains buried four people for hours, killing one, while three men died in an avalanche in the Colorado Rockies and a man on snowshoes was engulfed in a massive slide in Utah. In California, where 2 feet of snow recently fell in the Lake Tahoe area, three men and a woman were sledding Saturday afternoon when snow gave way. All four were buried in up to 6 feet of snow along the shore of a lake in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Anthony York
FRESNO -- Gov. Jerry Brown said Monday his administration would soon declare that California is officially in the midst of a drought. “It's coming,” Brown said of a formal proclamation when asked during a press conference at Fresno City Hall. “Just be patient.” A recent survey of the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains found the state's water reserves are at just 20% of normal levels. Other measures have declared 2013 to be the driest year in California history. “It's really serious,” Brown said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Anthony York
FRESNO -- Gov. Jerry Brown said Monday his administration would soon declare that California is officially in the midst of a drought. “It's coming,” Brown said of a formal proclamation when asked during a press conference at Fresno City Hall. “Just be patient.” A recent survey of the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains found the state's water reserves are at just 20% of normal levels. Other measures have declared 2013 to be the driest year in California history. “It's really serious,” Brown said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2008 | Bettina Boxall, Boxall is a Times staff writer
Forest fires in the Sierra Nevada have grown larger, more frequent and more damaging in the last two decades, according to a study that suggests much of the blame rests with the government's century-long war on wildfire. The study, published online this month in the journal Ecosystems, found that between 1984 and 2006, the proportion of burned areas where no trees survived increased, on average, to nearly 30%, from 17%. Climate is playing some role, the study said.
SPORTS
November 13, 2002 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
When darkness gave way to sunshine Monday morning, long-barren slopes wore a glistening white blanket up to four feet thick in places, courtesy of a blizzard that worked its magic for four long, cold days through the Sierra Nevada mountains. Since, the mad scramble that follows every first storm has been underway, as ski-area operators began preparing for the onslaught of skiers and snowboarders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"One More Mountain," a TV movie airing at 9 p.m. Sunday on ABC, is about the ill-fated 1846 Donner Party, many of whom resorted to cannibalism to stay alive after they were trapped in the Sierra Nevada mountains during the harsh winter. It is not, however, about cannibalism. "People tuning into our show will be a little disappointed if they come looking for that," said star Meredith Baxter. "We are the people who didn't eat people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
There was no shortage of snow here last winter. But under a withering sun, the snowmelt started in mid-March, in what appears to be one of the earliest onsets in almost 90 years. Some scientists suspect it is another sign that climate change is eroding the Sierra Nevada snowpack, the state's main source of water.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bodies are piling up at the Truckee-Tahoe Mortuary. The snow is so deep that the gravediggers have been idled until spring's thaw. A few peaks away in Markleeville, Charlie Dobson believes he is "the luckiest guy in the world." An avalanche of powder gobbled him up one morning in January, but after 35 terrifying minutes, a Caltrans worker dug him out. Rebecca Hamil of Chester is thankful too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Bush administration official says he needs additional time to decide whether to review a new management plan for national forests in the Sierra Nevada. Opponents of the plan, which would significantly reduce timber cutting in the range's 11 national forests, turned to Agriculture Undersecretary Mark Rey after Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth affirmed the blueprint last month. On Tuesday, Rey asked the Forest Service to provide him with appeal records on the plan. Rey has until Dec.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's top federal forester Friday signed a long-anticipated master plan for the state's Sierra Nevada--a document that will significantly reduce logging and may save some vulnerable species from decline. The management blueprint for 11 national forests in the state's northeast continues the U.S. Forest Service's turn from an emphasis on commercial logging to a more conservation-oriented approach. The guidelines call for the amount of timber cut on 11.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 400,000 acres of wild land in the Eastern Sierra Nevada should be made protected habitat for an endangered mountain sheep, the federal government said. The proposed habitat for the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep runs from Tuolumne County to Tulare County and juts into the Inyo and Humboldt-Toiyabe national forests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2006 | From Times staff and wire reports
Controversial logging legislation by a San Joaquin Valley congressman would hasten several timber projects in the Sequoia and Sierra national forests, environmentalists say. The plan by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare) has been presented as a way to keep forests healthy and sawmill workers employed. But environmentalists say it threatens vulnerable species, as well as Giant Sequoia National Monument. A House hearing was scheduled for Thursday.
SCIENCE
July 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The chemical traces of prehistoric raindrops in crumbling boulders have led Stanford University researchers to conclude that the Sierra Nevada is at least 40 million years old, much older than previously thought. New geological evidence shows that the traditional estimate of 3 million to 5 million years old appears far too low, three Stanford geoscientists said in a paper published in Friday's issue of the journal Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2006 | From Times Staff And Wire Reports
A woman died after she and two companions were caught in an avalanche while skiing in the Twin Lakes area of the Eastern Sierra backcountry, according to Mono County sheriff's deputies. The avalanche occurred just before noon Wednesday near Black Smith Canyon. Joshua Feinburg, 30, of Mammoth Lakes was treated at the scene. The woman, whose name was withheld pending notification of relatives, was airlifted to a hospital where she was pronounced dead. The third skier was able to go for help.
NEWS
August 16, 2005 | Barbara E. Hernandez
Few are altogether deaf to the preaching of pine trees. Their sermons on the mountains go to our hearts; and if people in general could be got into the woods, even for once, to hear the trees speak for themselves, all difficulties in the way of forest preservation would vanish.
NEWS
May 17, 2005 | Martin Griffith, Special to The Times
Mike Dobel is worried. A biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, Dobel charts mule deer populations in California and Nevada, and he doesn't like what he sees. Development running along the backside of the Sierra Nevada, a 300-mile section of U.S. 395 running between Bishop and Susanville, appears to have compromised the deer's habitat and may threaten the future of the herd. The problem is especially acute in and around Reno, where about 13,000 deer live.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Forest Service is expected to announce today a long-awaited decision that would substantially increase protections for the Sierra Nevada's oldest trees and most vulnerable wildlife. The management blueprint for 11.5 million acres of national forest land in the Sierra, which will shape countless specific policies, is the latest in a series of sweeping environmental decisions by the Clinton administration in its final days in office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001
A six-hour swarm of earthquakes, the strongest magnitude 4.1 and 4.0, struck a sparsely populated area of the Eastern Sierra near Walker Pass on California 178 Thursday afternoon, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. The quakes, all about five miles under the Earth's surface, were felt from the San Joaquin Valley cities of Bakersfield and Porterville east to Trona and north along U.S. 395 to Olancha, but there were no reports of damage or injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
A Bush administration official Monday upheld a decision to boost logging in Sierra Nevada national forests. In a five-paragraph decision, Agriculture Undersecretary Mark Rey left unchanged guidelines that will triple current logging levels on the range's 11.5 million acres of national forest. The Sierra forests have been the scene of a long, bitter fight for more than a decade. The Clinton administration slashed timber cutting and increased wildlife protections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2005 | Robert Hollis, Special to The Times
An orphaned three-legged bear cub panhandling for food along a popular snowmobile trail in the High Sierra has triggered a sometimes acrimonious debate between animal lovers who want the young bruin rescued and wildlife officials who say they should let nature take its course.
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