Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSierra Nevada Mountains
IN THE NEWS

Sierra Nevada Mountains

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
An avalanche in the Sierra Nevada mountains buried four people for hours, killing one, while three men died in an avalanche in the Colorado Rockies and a man on snowshoes was engulfed in a massive slide in Utah. In California, where 2 feet of snow recently fell in the Lake Tahoe area, three men and a woman were sledding Saturday afternoon when snow gave way. All four were buried in up to 6 feet of snow along the shore of a lake in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Anthony York
FRESNO -- Gov. Jerry Brown said Monday his administration would soon declare that California is officially in the midst of a drought. “It's coming,” Brown said of a formal proclamation when asked during a press conference at Fresno City Hall. “Just be patient.” A recent survey of the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains found the state's water reserves are at just 20% of normal levels. Other measures have declared 2013 to be the driest year in California history. “It's really serious,” Brown said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Anthony York
FRESNO -- Gov. Jerry Brown said Monday his administration would soon declare that California is officially in the midst of a drought. “It's coming,” Brown said of a formal proclamation when asked during a press conference at Fresno City Hall. “Just be patient.” A recent survey of the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains found the state's water reserves are at just 20% of normal levels. Other measures have declared 2013 to be the driest year in California history. “It's really serious,” Brown said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
The Obama administration Thursday declined to list the American pika as endangered, denying environmentalists' contention that the tiny mountain-dwelling creature will be unable to survive climate change. The rabbit-like mammal lives on the high slopes of California's Sierra Nevada and in parts of nine other Western states. It is highly sensitive to small changes in temperature. Larry Crist, a Utah field supervisor for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which reviewed scientific literature on the pika, said the creature can adapt and find suitable habitat despite a predicted summertime rise of 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit in the animal's current range by 2050.
SPORTS
November 13, 2002 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
When darkness gave way to sunshine Monday morning, long-barren slopes wore a glistening white blanket up to four feet thick in places, courtesy of a blizzard that worked its magic for four long, cold days through the Sierra Nevada mountains. Since, the mad scramble that follows every first storm has been underway, as ski-area operators began preparing for the onslaught of skiers and snowboarders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"One More Mountain," a TV movie airing at 9 p.m. Sunday on ABC, is about the ill-fated 1846 Donner Party, many of whom resorted to cannibalism to stay alive after they were trapped in the Sierra Nevada mountains during the harsh winter. It is not, however, about cannibalism. "People tuning into our show will be a little disappointed if they come looking for that," said star Meredith Baxter. "We are the people who didn't eat people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2005 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Irate that potentially disease-carrying domestic sheep are grazing in prime turf for the endangered Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, environmentalists have sued Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, seeking habitat protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2009 | Tony Perry
For thousands of U.S. Marines, the road to Afghanistan goes through an isolated training facility here in the Eastern Sierra where they share the rugged Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest with civilian hunters, backpackers and skiers. On a recent weekend, several hundred Marines were on an overnight march to test their land navigation, communication and outdoor survival skills. As they returned to base camp Sunday morning, hunters dressed in orange vests were driving their four-wheel-drive vehicles up the mountain in hopes of bagging deer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
There was no shortage of snow here last winter. But under a withering sun, the snowmelt started in mid-March, in what appears to be one of the earliest onsets in almost 90 years. Some scientists suspect it is another sign that climate change is eroding the Sierra Nevada snowpack, the state's main source of water.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bodies are piling up at the Truckee-Tahoe Mortuary. The snow is so deep that the gravediggers have been idled until spring's thaw. A few peaks away in Markleeville, Charlie Dobson believes he is "the luckiest guy in the world." An avalanche of powder gobbled him up one morning in January, but after 35 terrifying minutes, a Caltrans worker dug him out. Rebecca Hamil of Chester is thankful too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2009 | Tony Perry
For thousands of U.S. Marines, the road to Afghanistan goes through an isolated training facility here in the Eastern Sierra where they share the rugged Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest with civilian hunters, backpackers and skiers. On a recent weekend, several hundred Marines were on an overnight march to test their land navigation, communication and outdoor survival skills. As they returned to base camp Sunday morning, hunters dressed in orange vests were driving their four-wheel-drive vehicles up the mountain in hopes of bagging deer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2008 | Bettina Boxall, Boxall is a Times staff writer
Forest fires in the Sierra Nevada have grown larger, more frequent and more damaging in the last two decades, according to a study that suggests much of the blame rests with the government's century-long war on wildfire. The study, published online this month in the journal Ecosystems, found that between 1984 and 2006, the proportion of burned areas where no trees survived increased, on average, to nearly 30%, from 17%. Climate is playing some role, the study said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- It stood for most of a century in the High Sierra north of Yosemite National Park as a rare vestige of the Old West -- a rustic lodge where visitors could spend the night, eat a hearty meal and pack into the rugged wilderness on a mule train. Early Monday, a fire reduced Kennedy Meadows Resort and Pack Station to smoldering debris.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 400,000 acres of wild land in the Eastern Sierra Nevada should be made protected habitat for an endangered mountain sheep, the federal government said. The proposed habitat for the Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep runs from Tuolumne County to Tulare County and juts into the Inyo and Humboldt-Toiyabe national forests.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2007 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
THE smell of steaks sizzling on a campfire grill wafted through towering tamarack and Jeffrey pines as the sun set over the saw-toothed crest of Duck Pass in the Eastern Sierra about eight miles south of Mammoth Lakes. We sat on folding chairs around the crackling fire, sipping beer, while our cook prepared a dinner of surprising delicacy.
TRAVEL
April 22, 2007 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
EVERY road sings its own tune. Route 66 is a classic, sometimes raucous ditty from Chicago to L.A.; Highway 1 a twisty ballad to the voluptuous California coast; and U.S. 395 a mandolin-driven ode to the West that evokes images of cowboy boots and roadside diners. Route 395 is our mother road. Its two-lane panoramas of the Eastern Sierra -- especially from Lone Pine to Mono Lake -- are an invitation to shift into a simpler time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Bush administration official says he needs additional time to decide whether to review a new management plan for national forests in the Sierra Nevada. Opponents of the plan, which would significantly reduce timber cutting in the range's 11 national forests, turned to Agriculture Undersecretary Mark Rey after Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth affirmed the blueprint last month. On Tuesday, Rey asked the Forest Service to provide him with appeal records on the plan. Rey has until Dec.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's top federal forester Friday signed a long-anticipated master plan for the state's Sierra Nevada--a document that will significantly reduce logging and may save some vulnerable species from decline. The management blueprint for 11 national forests in the state's northeast continues the U.S. Forest Service's turn from an emphasis on commercial logging to a more conservation-oriented approach. The guidelines call for the amount of timber cut on 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2006 | From Times staff and wire reports
Controversial logging legislation by a San Joaquin Valley congressman would hasten several timber projects in the Sequoia and Sierra national forests, environmentalists say. The plan by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare) has been presented as a way to keep forests healthy and sawmill workers employed. But environmentalists say it threatens vulnerable species, as well as Giant Sequoia National Monument. A House hearing was scheduled for Thursday.
SCIENCE
July 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The chemical traces of prehistoric raindrops in crumbling boulders have led Stanford University researchers to conclude that the Sierra Nevada is at least 40 million years old, much older than previously thought. New geological evidence shows that the traditional estimate of 3 million to 5 million years old appears far too low, three Stanford geoscientists said in a paper published in Friday's issue of the journal Science.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|