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Sierra Nevada

NEWS
March 3, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest storm front to thunder through Southern California dumped more than an inch of rain on parts of Orange County on Monday, but failed to end the drought locally, officials said. However, rainfall totals led one official Monday to declare an end to the drought in Ventura and southern Santa Barbara counties, spreading hopes along the drenched California coast that restrictions on water use may soon ease elsewhere.
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NEWS
July 3, 1992 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob and Sharon Miller watched their only son, Kenny, nearly die of meningitis a decade ago. The high fever and brain swelling left him mentally disabled, forever 4 years old. It wasn't easy raising him. He had a hard time sitting still. He would see a butterfly and off he'd go. The choice was either to manacle his life or open up the world to him. The Millers, both popular high school teachers here, chose the latter course for their 12-year-old son, friends say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | DEBORATH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California's top federal forester is being transferred to a new job, dismaying conservation groups who fear the move portends the dismantling of a plan to protect old-growth forests and fragile wildlife in the Sierra Nevada.
TRAVEL
December 6, 2009 | By Jordan Rane
It's not K2 or Kanchenjunga. It's not McKinley or even Kilimanjaro. It's mighty Mt. Whitney, the tallest mountain in America's Lower 48 states and reputedly the highest walk-up summit on the planet open to just about any local bucket-lister with a healthy pulse, reliable footwear, the right attitude and enough foresight to apply in February for a summer climbing permit. Perched atop its boulder-strewn crest on a cloudless Saturday afternoon in July or August, gaping over a glorious granite sea of southern Sierra Nevada peaks, is a crowd of high-fivers about as select-looking as a line at the DMV. Who's standing on top of Whitney this aft?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The genetic signature of canine slobber on a bait bag of chicken scraps and a fuzzy photograph from a motion-sensitive camera north of Yosemite National Park have confirmed the existence of a red fox, thought to have been all but wiped out, the U.S. Forest Service announced last week. "The last known sighting of a Sierra Nevada red fox in the Sonora Pass area was some time in the 1920s," said Mike Crawley, Bridgeport District ranger. "Needless to say, we are quite surprised and excited by this find.
NEWS
February 17, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman, who until recently represented one of the most vehement opponents of a blueprint for conserving 11.5 million acres of national forest land in the Sierra Nevada, has recused herself from all decisions on the issue, her spokesman said. As a private attorney, Veneman represented the Sierra Nevada Access, Multiple Use and Stewardship Coalition, an umbrella of 80 groups that use the forests for snowmobiling, hunting, logging and other purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
The illegal marijuana-growing operations that have proliferated in remote areas of the Sierra Nevada appear to be taking a toll on the fisher, a forest animal whose numbers are dangerously low. Researchers studying fishers in the Sierra National Forest in the southern Sierra found that mortality rates were significantly higher for females living in areas with a number of marijuana-growing sites. Liberal amounts of pesticides and anticoagulant rodent poison are commonly used at the operations, tainting small prey the fisher eats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2002 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- A trio of nonprofit groups announced a $2.5-million deal Thursday to put a 13,000-acre ranch off-limits to development in the Sierra Valley, a sweeping and scenic alpine bowl north of Lake Tahoe that is under increasing growth pressure. The agreement prohibits development on the Bar One cattle ranch, which sprawls across 10% of the 130,000-acre valley, the biggest in the Sierra Nevada. Funding came from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2008 | William Booth, Washington Post
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK -- He took his first hike into the Sierra Nevada, the landscape of his obsession, while still in the womb. His parents named him John Muir Laws. He once spent a week searching for a single perfect orchid to paint. He says, "I am constantly amazed by things." Such as? "The diversity of chipmunks." He is not joking. He cares about newts. If asked, he does an excellent imitation of a startled vole. He has opinions about beetles.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
With a dry spring heralding the onset of another drought in the Sierra Nevada, forestry officials fear that a policy intended to protect the old-growth habitat of the California spotted owl may have the opposite effect, heightening the risk of catastrophic fire. As the biggest, most marketable trees in the national forests are put off limits to logging, sawmills are disappearing and with them the financial incentive to clear out the deadwood and dense stands of small trees that are turning the Sierra into a giant tinderbox.
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