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Sierra Vista Scenic Byway

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April 29, 2001
The "Yosemite Sierra Visitors Guide 2001" focuses on California's Yosemite National Park and nearby communities. It's larded with advertisements (sometimes you have to hunt for the text), but it has a lodging guide, a calendar of events, a map of the Sierra Vista National Scenic Byway and other useful information. Tel. (559) 683-4636, http://www.go2yosemite.net.
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TRAVEL
August 24, 2008
Reading your article about Best Friends animal sanctuary made me warm and fuzzy all over ["Where Pets Outnumber People," Secret Spots of the West, Aug. 17]. Could anything make you feel better than caring for one of these innocent creatures? How rewarding to be in the beautiful outdoors of Utah away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Agneta Ekebrand Los Angeles -- Writer Mary Forgione forgot to tell the readers about one of the best things about the drive on the Sierra Vista Scenic Byway ["Forest Loop Is Blissfully Lonely"]
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | Mary Forgione, Times Staff Writer
SECRET SPOTS OF THE WEST We asked you to nominate your favorite vacation places in the West -- your travel touchstones, so to speak -- and you came back with a satchel full of suggestions. We sifted and sorted and chose six to explore for ourselves. Marvelous or mundane? You be the judge. -- "In most tourists' rush to get to Yosemite National Park, they overlook this beautiful drive," writes reader Susanne Waite of Coarsegold, Calif., in nominating Sierra Vista Scenic Byway.
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February 23, 1992 | STEPHEN ALTSCHULER, Altschuler is an Oakland-based free-lance writer and photographer. and
The approach to the world's second-largest tree is a quiet one. There are no crowds pressing to be first in line. There are no cars within a mile of it, and even then just a scant few. There are no rangers herding people along, nor are there restraints around the giant tree preventing a closer approach. No, you can walk right up and hug "Bull Buck"--that's what it's called--like you would your Uncle Bill. There's one other tree taller, but it's not as wide at the base.
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