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Sight Unseen Play

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is good art? What is the role of the artist in society? Can art and the artist remain untainted by commercial success? What's more important: audience reaction or the artist's intent? Such questions run like a river through "Sight Unseen," the Donald Margulies play that Alternative Repertory Theatre has chosen for its second production in its new, bigger home in Santa Ana's much-publicized Artists Village, into which the city has poured about $8 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is good art? What is the role of the artist in society? Can art and the artist remain untainted by commercial success? What's more important: audience reaction or the artist's intent? Such questions run like a river through "Sight Unseen," the Donald Margulies play that Alternative Repertory Theatre has chosen for its second production in its new, bigger home in Santa Ana's much-publicized Artists Village, into which the city has poured about $8 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1996 | Sean Mitchell, Sean Mitchell is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In his acclaimed play of five years ago "Sight Unseen," Donald Margulies drew a provocative profile of a voguish contemporary painter whose superficial success masked a fear that his powers of inspiration had disappeared with his youth and a particular youthful romance. It was a smart play about art and celebrity culture, as well as about missed connections in our time and old wounds in the chest that never heal completely.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
By coincidence, the day I saw "Sight Unseen"--a play by Donald Margulies about a fictional artist superstar of the '80s, currently in its world premiere production on South Coast Repertory's Second Stage in Costa Mesa--I spent the morning visiting a local artist. He wryly recounted how, shortly before a carefully budgeted trip to New York, he sent a few slides of his work to a Manhattan gallery recommended by a top curator in Los Angeles.
MAGAZINE
November 16, 1997 | MARK HEISLER
From the beginning, this town was big enough for both of them. Actually, it was big enough for 10 more like them. When Elgin Baylor, already an NBA superstar at 25, and Jerry West, an up-holler rookie from West Virginia, met on a hazy August morning in 1960 for the Lakers' first Southern California training camp, Los Angeles barely knew they were there. The town that had gone gaga for the Dodgers hardly cared that it had a professional basketball team.
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