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Sigmar Polke

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December 3, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
To interview German artist Sigmar Polke is to know how Margaret Dumont must've felt trying to get a straight answer out of the Marx Brothers. Granted, it's kind of fun having Polke run circles around you as he deftly deflects every question you lob his way, but it's hard to respect yourself later when you realize that he got through the interview without revealing much about himself. He's an elusive character, but he's so bloody charming it's easy to overlook that fact.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
To interview German artist Sigmar Polke is to know how Margaret Dumont must've felt trying to get a straight answer out of the Marx Brothers. Granted, it's kind of fun having Polke run circles around you as he deftly deflects every question you lob his way, but it's hard to respect yourself later when you realize that he got through the interview without revealing much about himself. He's an elusive character, but he's so bloody charming it's easy to overlook that fact.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sigmar Polke is a terrifically important artist, and "Sigmar Polke" is a terrifically important exhibition. Just about the only disappointment attached to the sprawling retrospective, which opened Thursday at the Museum of Modern Art here, is that it won't be traveling to Los Angeles. (After San Francisco, it moves to Washington, D.C., Chicago and New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sigmar Polke is a terrifically important artist, and "Sigmar Polke" is a terrifically important exhibition. Just about the only disappointment attached to the sprawling retrospective, which opened Thursday at the Museum of Modern Art here, is that it won't be traveling to Los Angeles. (After San Francisco, it moves to Washington, D.C., Chicago and New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | Louise Roug
With the help of a donation from a fund established by Charles Simonyi, the Louisiana Museum in Denmark is scheduled to undergo a $22-million renovation. The Hungarian-born Simonyi developed the Microsoft programs Word and Excell. The museum is showing the exhibition "I Hate You," which includes work by Sigmar Polke, Raymond Pettibon, Paul McCarthy and Mike Kelley. Louise Roug
NEWS
November 28, 1996
Konrad Fischer, 57, a gallery owner and important dealer in contemporary art. Fischer used his mother's maiden name, Lueg, in his early days as an artist, and attracted notice when he staged a "Demonstration for the Capitalist Realism" and other conceptual projects, with Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and Manfred Kuttner. In 1967, he opened a gallery with his wife, Dorothee, and his first exhibition introduced to Europe the American artist Carl Andres.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998
Outside the Lines: Michael Balog's small lithographs at Cirrus Gallery are roughly the size of the vintage Barbie coloring books whose pages they mimic. And as if to spite their saccharine source material, they wreak havoc upon the ordered world of Saturday night dates ("dinner and a show"), weddings and other forms of insistently heterosexual bliss.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1993 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES *Christopher Grimes Gallery, 916 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, (310) 587-3383, Closes Saturday
In Linda Burnham's snazzy paintings, a self-conscious melange of disparate styles and diverse techniques overlap and intersect, but never really settle into resolution or unity. This sense of incompletion doesn't signal a weakness in her art, but articulates its sneaky strength. Burnham's paintings take over the logic of collage, piecing together found objects and elements to form fresh, unanticipated orders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People love to hate Julian Schnabel's paintings and sculptures (along with his record album and movie), but doing so usually gets in the way of seeing this ambitious artist's works for what they are. At PaceWildenstein Gallery, 13 paintings from the past 10 years and two sculptures from the 1980s reveal that Schnabel's art strives to combine the pompous grandiosity of Anselm Kiefer's paintings with the self-deprecatory sarcasm of Mike Kelley's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
In a pledge that reinforces a philanthropic tradition, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has received the promise of a gift of 33 pieces from Clifford Einstein, chair of MOCA's board of trustees, and his wife, Madeline. The donation comprises works made over the last three decades by an international slate of prominent artists, including Kiki Smith, Nam June Paik, Mark Grotjahn, Sigmar Polke, Mike Kelley and Lari Pittman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Burnett Miller, an adventurous Los Angeles art dealer known for presenting critically acclaimed exhibitions of an international array of contemporary art, died Monday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 45. His family declined to release the cause of his death. An energetic and insightful entrepreneur who had an eye for quality and a finger on the pulse of contemporary art, Miller is credited with introducing the work of young artists who later achieved international renown.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A Vital Matrix" is a 45-artist exhibition loosely based on the obvious idea that human beings are a part of nature, not passive spectators to its sublime spectacles but sentient organisms embedded in its mundane processes.
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