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Sigmund Freud

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NEWS
November 12, 1987 | MICHAEL SPECTER, The Washington Post
Helen Kraft began tracking her father's story a decade ago. She knew vaguely that he had some association with Sigmund Freud and she knew that he was one of America's first psychoanalysts. But the Alexandria, Va., woman's tireless inquiries into the life of Horace Westlake Frink, who died in 1936, have shed light on far more than her family heritage.
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SPORTS
April 11, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
LAS VEGAS - They are asking all the wrong people here to predict the outcome of Saturday night's fight between Manny Pacquiao and Tim Bradley. Sportswriters? Are you kidding? This analysis demands a bit more depth than arguing the merits of the designated hitter. Too bad Sigmund Freud has departed us. His insights into these two fighters could be both learned and insightful. In the blue corner, from the Philippines, is the congressman from the Sarangani district, Manny Pacquiao, with a record of 55-5-2 and 38 knockouts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Chris Jones
"If the whole universe had no meaning," C.S. Lewis once wrote, "we should never have found out that it had no meaning. " Pithy observations like that - rooted in logical argument - have made the writer one Christian whom many agnostics and atheists accept and enjoy. "Religion is comparable to a childhood neurosis," Sigmund Freud once wrote. "Mankind will surmount this neurotic phase, just as so many children grow out of their similar neurosis. " A pithy observation like that is one reason many people are stimulated by Freud's writing, even if they regard his psychology as dated, oversexualized nonsense.
WORLD
January 15, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Thieves who attempted to steal a priceless Greek urn containing the cremated remains of Sigmund Freud from its resting place in London failed to make off with the ashes but badly damaged the 2,300-year-old receptacle, Scotland Yard said Wednesday. The botched break-in occurred on New Year's Day at a crypt preserving and displaying the remains of artists, intellectuals and political leaders who span the social spectrum, from wartime capitulator Neville Chamberlain to doomed songstress Amy Winehouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | MIKE WYMA
Sigmund Freud, a funny guy? Sigmund Freud, sexually confused? Sigmund Freud, the stuff of theater? Exactly so, says actor Harold Gould, who portrays the founder of psychoanalysis in a one-man show coming to the University of Judaism this weekend. "He was a fascinating person," Gould said. "The play reveals something about his frustrations, his ambitions, the process he discovered and the resistance he encountered, particularly on the sexual theories.
BOOKS
March 24, 2002 | MICHAEL S. ROTH, Michael S. Roth was curator of the exhibition "Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture" at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles and is president of the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland and San Francisco.
There is an old man we go to see when we are feeling bad or just confused. He doesn't say much. He sits behind us when we lie down on the couch. We can hear him breathing, and we smell his cigar. He makes us talk, if only because he refuses to say much. We know what he wants. Not just any old stories will do. He wants to hear about our secrets, our longings. We can start talking about the latest disappointments, the most recent crises. But we know that's not enough.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
"In the past," Abe Kaplan observed, "if someone thought he was Napoleon, the chances were he would be locked up. Today he is apt to occupy a seat of power." Kaplan, professor of philosophy at the University of Haifa and a visiting professor at UCLA, was one of the speakers at a conference on "The Century of Freud" held at the Westwood campus last weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1993 | TOM JACOBS, Tom Jacobs is a regular contributor to The Times
Like many married men, pioneering psychiatrist Carl Jung had a mistress. That would be one of the least interesting aspects of this seminal thinker's life if not for the unexpected reaction of his wife, Emma. She found she could live with it. In fact, she gradually forged a close bond with Jung's lover, Toni Wolff, who, as did Emma herself, became an analyst. The three, who were known to travel to conferences together, formed a relationship that lasted for years.
BOOKS
September 23, 2007 | Michael S. Roth, Michael S. Roth is president of Wesleyan University. He is former president of California College of the Arts and was curator of the 1998 Library of Congress exhibition "Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture."
More than 150 years after his birth, Sigmund Freud still haunts us. His ideas creep into our language like a symptom, or like an unconscious desire. Sometimes it's all in fun, as when Brian, the thoughtful canine on Fox's "Family Guy," wondered with the therapist if his wetting the floor was an act of aggression. Sometimes it's to deepen our engagement with a narrative, as happened to Tony Soprano, in HBO's "The Sopranos," when he tried, with the help of his therapist, Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2011 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An Anatomy of Addiction Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine Howard Markel Pantheon: 352 pp., $28.95 Sigmund Freud sniffed it. William Halsted injected it with a hypodermic needle. Both men, as ambitious and driven young doctors in the 1880s, became addicted to cocaine. History suggests that Freud kicked his habit; Halsted never did. Halsted pioneered a host of surgical methods, the use of anesthesia, and antiseptic procedures in surgery rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2014 | By Alice Short
Minna Bernays may not be a household name, but her brother-in-law -- Sigmund Freud -- is. Bernays, who was rumored to have had an affair with the psychoanalyst at the end of the 19th century, is the main character of  Karen Mack and Jennifer Kaufman's 2013 historical novel “Freud's Mistress.” Novelists can't seem to leave Freud and his entourage alone. D.M. Thomas had him on the brain in “The White Hotel” and “Lying Together”; Freud also inspired Thomas' “Eating Pavlova” and Goce Smilevski's “Freud's Sister”; and his wife, Martha, takes center stage in Nicolle Rosen's “Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
"Breakfast with Lucian," Geordie Greig's juicy, eye-popping book about Lucian Freud, the notoriously priapic painter best known for raw portraits that stripped his sitters bare in every sense, doesn't pretend to be objective or comprehensive. Greig offers a fond but by no means whitewashed account of how Freud's spectacularly messy life relates to his extraordinary body of work as "the greatest realist figurative painter of the twentieth century. " A grandson of Sigmund Freud, the budding artist escaped from Nazi Germany to England with his family when he was 10, in 1933.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2013 | Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Hedda Bolgar, a psychologist old enough to have attended Sigmund Freud's lectures in Vienna but youthful enough to have treated patients until just a few weeks ago, has died. She was 103. Her mind was sharp, her zest for work keen, and her social calendar full until shortly before her death on Monday, said Allen Yasser, her longtime friend and colleague. "It took me a month to get a dinner date with her, and we were virtually family," said Yasser, a psychologist and psychoanalyst.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Sigmund Freud considered religion a mass delusion, a sort of group neurosis ideally suited to obsessive types. C.S. Lewis was a literary intellectual who found ways of channeling his devout Christianity into even his nontheological writings, "The Chronicles of Narnia" most famously among them. In "Freud's Last Session," the popular off-Broadway play now at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica starring Judd Hirsch and Tom Cavanagh, playwright Mark St. Germain imagines a meeting between these titans in Freud's London home just as the Second World War is erupting and the father of psychoanalysis is dying a painful death from oral cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Chris Jones
"If the whole universe had no meaning," C.S. Lewis once wrote, "we should never have found out that it had no meaning. " Pithy observations like that - rooted in logical argument - have made the writer one Christian whom many agnostics and atheists accept and enjoy. "Religion is comparable to a childhood neurosis," Sigmund Freud once wrote. "Mankind will surmount this neurotic phase, just as so many children grow out of their similar neurosis. " A pithy observation like that is one reason many people are stimulated by Freud's writing, even if they regard his psychology as dated, oversexualized nonsense.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Even though British painter Lucian Freud died at the age of 88 in 2011 , he just can't stop setting records. In what's said to be the largest amount ever bequeathed by a British artist, Freud left 96 million pounds (approximately $156 million) in his will. Freud last landed in the record books for his lush nude painting "Benefits Supervisor Sleeping" (1995), which fetched $33 million at auction in 2008, the largest sum ever received for a work by a living artist.
BOOKS
May 8, 1988 | Peter J. Swales, Swales is a well-known Freud historian and the author of a forthcoming biography of Wilhelm Fliess (Farrar, Straus & Giroux).
In the interest of promulgating his controversial theories, Sigmund Freud saw fit to report and interpret myriad events from his own life, mind and dreams. But he was exceedingly selective when doing so and, later in life, was sharply averse to submitting to a candid biography.
OPINION
May 6, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
FEELING A strange electrical charge between your id, ego and superego this morning? Interpreting last night's dreams with a little more gusto? Is the toaster looking especially fetching right about now, causing you to wonder if your polymorphous perversity extends to kitchen appliances? Fear not. There's an explanation for all this subliminal activity. Today is the 150th birthday of Sigmund Freud, the sex-obsessed, Oedipal-complexed "father of psychoanalysis."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2011 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An Anatomy of Addiction Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine Howard Markel Pantheon: 352 pp., $28.95 Sigmund Freud sniffed it. William Halsted injected it with a hypodermic needle. Both men, as ambitious and driven young doctors in the 1880s, became addicted to cocaine. History suggests that Freud kicked his habit; Halsted never did. Halsted pioneered a host of surgical methods, the use of anesthesia, and antiseptic procedures in surgery rooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2011 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Lucian Freud, a British artist who gained fame for his intense and deeply textural nude paintings, has died. He was 88. Freud, the grandson of the pioneering psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, died Wednesday at his home in London following an illness, according to a representative for his New York dealer, William Acquavella. The artist's best-known works feature subjects in anguished, anti-erotic poses, their psychology externalized onto their fleshy bodies. He liked to use impasto, a technique involving the thick application of paint, to create his highly textured portraits.
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